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DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 



■I 



CLOSED 
STACKS 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



GOVERNMENT INFORMATION CENTER 
SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 



C\ 



B 7 372 



'^1223 90120 8562 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant 



http://archive.org/details/annualreport19651970sanf 



DOCUMENTS 

NOV 7- 1966 

SAN FRANCISCO 
fSSfiuC LIBRA** 



1965—66 

Annual Report 
DIRECTOR OF 



FINANCE AND RECORDS 







INCLUDING 

County Clerk Recorder Records Center 

Registrar of Voters Tax Collector 

Records Preservation Officer 



Public Guardian 



Public Administrator 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Agricultural Commissioner Farmers' Market 



CITY kND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Director of Finance and Records 

September 1, 1966 



Subject: 1965-66 Annual Report 

Honorable Thomas J. Mellon 
Chief Administrative Officer 
City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Mr. Mellon: 

As required by Charter Section 20, herewith is respectfully submitted 
the annual report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1966, covering 
the City and County departments and offices under the jurisdiction 
of the Director of Finance and Records. 

Subject to your approval, we administer the services and activities 
of the Departments of Finance and Records, Weights and Measures, and 
Agriculture, which include the offices of County Clerk, Recorder, 
Registrar of Voters, Fublic Administrator, Public Guardian, Tax 
Collector, Records Center, Records Preservation Officer, Sealer of 
Weights and Measures, Farmers' Market and Agricultural Commissioner. 

Separate reports for each of these offices are included herein, together 
with the statistical data requested by the Mayor. Each separate report 
was prepared by the office head concerned. The Records Preservation 
Officer report was prepared by the Director of Finance and Records. 

Offices which more than pay their own way through fees collected for 
services provided, are the County Clerk, Recorder, Public Administrator, 
and Farmers' Market. The Public Guardian likewise more than pays its 
own way, but the benefits come largely through hospital benefits paid 
in behalf of the wards. 



Very truly yours, 



U 



VIRGIL L. ELLIOTT 
Director 



^ 3T3.01 

^.5"^^- 



I K D : X 

Letter of Transmittal 1 

Index 2 

Organization Chart 3 

Records Preservation Officer . . . k 

Records Center 11 

County Clerk l*f 

Recorder 21 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 2k 

Agricultural Commissioner 28 

Farmers' Market 33 

Registrar of Voters 36 

Public Administrator-Public Guardian .... 39 
Tax Collector kk 



-2- 



0R3ANIZATI0N CHART — DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND RECORDS 
City and County of San Francisco, California 



MAYOR AND BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 



LEGAL 



City & Dist Attys 



FISCAL 



Controller, Tree, 



PROPERTY 



Real Estate Dept. 



PERSONNEL 



Civil Service 



CHIEF 
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



Thomas J. Mellon 



EMPLOYEE WELFARE 



Ret. Sys., H.S.S. 



SUPPLY 



Purchasing Dept. 



DIRECTOR'S OFFICE 



2 employees 



DIRECTOR 

of 

FINANCE AND RECORDS 



Virgil L. Elliott 



REGISTRAR 
OF VOTERS 



Chas. A. Rogers 



Register San Francisco 
voters; conduct elec- 
tions, I NCLUD ING EM- 
PLOYEE ELECT1 ONS J 
MA I NTA IN VOT ING MA- 
CHINES. 



2k employees 



COUNTY CLERK, 
RECORDER 



Martin Mongan 



KEEP RECORDS OF ' 
SUPERIOR COUR T ; 
ISSUE MARR I AGE LI 
CENSES ; PROV I DE 
COURTROOM CLERKS; 
RECORD AND INDEX 
D OCUME N TS . 



85 employees 



7-1-66 



AGRICULTURAL 
COMMISSIONER 



R. L. Bozzini 



I NSPECTS FRUITS, VEG 
ETABLES, NUTS, POUL - 
TRY , EGGS , HONE Y , 
NURSERY, PEST CONTROL 

a seed; inspect for 

PLANT OUARANTINE AND 
EXPORT CERT I F I CATES . 



9 employees 



MAIN., REPAIR 



Pub. Works Dept, 



TAX 

COLLECTOR 



Basil Healey 



COLLE CT AD VALOREM 
AND UNSECURED TAXES 
PARK I NG METER RE- 
CE I PTS j I SSUE BUS I - 
NESS LI CENSES ; RE- 
CEIVE PURCHASE AND 
USE TAX RECE I PTS . 
COLLECT HOTEL TAX 



66 employees 



PTjfiLIC ADMTN., 
PUBLIC GUARDIAN 



Con S. Shea 



ADM INISTER ESTATES; 
SERVES AS PUBLIC 
GUARD IAN. 



27 employees 



RECORDS 
CENTER 



Pierce Murphy 



3 employees 



FARMERS' 
MARKET 



P. J.O'Connell 
3 employees 



SEALER OF 
WTS. & MEASURES 



O.C. Skinner. Jr 



Test weighing and 
measuring oevicesj 
inspect packaged 
commoo i t i es . 



9 employees 



RECORDS PRESERVATION OFFICER 



1965-66 



Ordinance No. 126-62 declares that the "public interest demands that 
various City and County records which would be essential to the continuity 
of government and the protection of rights and interest of individuals in 
event of a major disaster be preserved against possible destruction by fire, 
earthquake, flood, enemy attack or other cause". 

Incorporated into the Administrative Code as Sections 8.9 through 8.11, 
this ordinance names the Chief administrative Officer, or the head of any 
department under his jurisdiction as designated by him, to serve as Records 
Preservation Officer. The Chief Administrative Officer delegated this duty 
to the Director of Finance and Records. 

Under provisions of the ordinance, the Records Preservation Officer 
"shall recommend to the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors a program for the 
selection and preservation of essential City and County records, shall advise 
and assist in its establishment and maintenance, and shall recommend the 
place and manner of safekeeping of essential records and preservation of 
duplicates". 

Annual Survey is Submitted 

The Records Preservation Officer is required to submit annually to the 
Mayor and the Board of Supervisors a report containing recommendations as to 
which City and County records should be designated as essential and preserved 
against a major disaster. In addition, he is required to report "on the 
status and progress of the records preservation program, together with recom- 
mendations for making such revisions as deemed necessary to keep the inventory 
of essential records current, accurate and complete". 

The latest such report submitted i/ecember 6, 1965» classified 31 » 373 
cubic feet of City and County records as essential within the meaning of 
Ordinance 126-62. However, only % 9 had been safeguarded by a preservation 
copy, either on microfilm or on paper. In other words, 91 per cent of the 
City's and County's essential records would be lost if the original copy 
were destroyed. 

Official Microfilming Policy 

The Board of Supervisors, on June 20, 1966, approved a resolution sub- 
mitted by the Records Preservation Officer declaring it to be official City 
and County policy that agencies having large quantities of old records which 
must be kept indefinitely, should have them microfilmed, with one film copy 
to remain in the agency for daily reference and a second film copy to be 
placed in a separate place for safekeeping. 

The cost to produce a 16 mm. microfilm image ranges from 1.10 to 1.50 

for letter size paper records and from 1.61? to 20 for legal size documents. 

The cost varies somewhat depending on whether the work is done by city 

personnel or by an outside contractor. 



-k- 



Official iMicrofilming Policy (Cont'd.) 

Records that must be kept indefinitely should be microfilmed. The 
breakeven point is approximately kO years. Any paper record that must be 
kept for ^0 years or more can be kept more economically (not to mention 
more conveniently) in microfilm form. And duplicate preservation copies 
should be made of all essential records. Duplicate 16 mij. microfilm copies 
can be made for about 1/2$ per image. 

Recommended Methods 

The Records Preservation Officer recommends that all departments 
request the funds necessary, or otherwise provide for protection of 
essential records in their custody through one of the following 
methods: 

A — A duplicate copy should be made of the original 
document; with either the duplicate or the original re- 
maining in use at its customary location, and the other 
being stored in a disaster-proof under-ground vault, or 
at a "dispersal" location. 

B — Upon determining that it is important to provide 
for a preservation duplicate, and further that the original 
record is not frequently used, the original should be 
stored in the disaster-proof under-ground vault or at a 
"dispersal" location as the "preservation" copy. 

The Records Preservation Officer will assist in whatever way possible 
in the developing of records preservation programs. Funds required for such 
activities may be requested by the various departments, offices, boards and 
commissions through the usual budgetary channels. 

A sound records preservation program is not only a protection of 
public records, but it may also prove • to be the more economical method, 
especially with regard to records that must be kept indefinitely, such 
as court records. Substantial space saving is another favorable by-product 
of this program. 

The 1965-66 "Inventor of Essential Records" begins on the next 
page. 



-5- 



INVENTORY OF RECORDS DESIGNATED AS ESSENTIAL, 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

as of December 6, 1965 
(Volume Indicated in Cubic Feet) 



Dept., Office, 
Board , or 
Commission 

ADULT PROBA- 
TION 



AIRPORT 



Type 

of 

Record 

Probationers Index 

Trust funds-open cases 
Board minutes 

Plant ledgers 
Notice to airmen 





NOT Safe- 


Safe- 




guarded 


guarded 




by Pre- 


by Pre- 




servation 


servation 


Total 


Copies 


Copies 


9 


9 





1 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 





1 


1 






ART COMM. 
ASSESSOR 



BOARD OF 

EDUCATION 



BOARD OF 
SUPERVISORS 



CHIEF ADMIN. 
OFFICER 



Commission minutes 



Real property 


110 


Personal property 


198 


Boats 


20 


Veterans 


12 


Legal-claims to state, 




contracts, etc. 


111 


Eoard minutes 


3 


Students 


3 


Teachers 


2 


Ordinances 


n 


Resolutions 


ii 


Indexes 


2 


Board minutes and 




Municipal reports 


23 


Pub. and Adv. 




contracts 


2 



108 

198 

19 

12 



108 

2 

1 
1 



1 

-1 

2 

23 



22 

10 




CITY ATTORNEY Recent litigated cases 590 

Active office files 2? 

Registers of actions 8 

CITY PLANNING Commission minutes k 

Land use maps 1 

Sanborn Maps 1 

Zoning 200 

Planning S>ll 

Administrative 21 

Historical 17 



590 
27 



or- 
o 

200 

ft 

21 
17 



-6- 



Dept., Office, 
Board, or 

Commission 

CIVIL SERVICE 



CONTROLLER 



deYOUNG MEMORIAL 
MUSEUM 



DISASTER CORPS 



DISTRICT 
ATTORNEY 



ELECTRICITY 



FINANCE AND 
RECORDS 







NOT Safe- 


Safe- 






guarded 


guarded 


Type 




by Pre- 


by Pre- 


of 




servation 


servation 


Record 


Total 


Copies 


Copies 


Examinations 


830 


30 





Certification 


102 


12 





In-service Training 


2 


2 





Payroll 


81 


80 


1 


Minutes, legal 


102 


102 





Standardization 


92 


92 





Fiscal - budget 








payroll, etc. 


7050 


7049 


1 



Legal records, 

minutes 16 

Matching funds 

documents 6 



Active aid to needy 
children cases 16 

Family relations index 20 
Active prosecution 
cases 3 

Maps of underground 

police and fire cables 2 



Director's records 

Recorder's documents 

Recorder's documents 

indexes 

Recorder's Li 3 Pendens 

Marriage certificates 

and indexes 

Secured tax rolls 

Business licenses 

Public Administrator 

active estates 175 

Superior Court 

registers of actions 

and indexes 620 

Superior Court cases, 

last 10 years 1900 

Statements of votes, 
municipal elections I36 



15 
6 



10 
20 



1 


1 


3580 


2 668 


65 


6k 


38 


38 


500 


100 


6U0" 


61itf 


10 


9 



175 

620 

1900 

136 





lilOO 

1 
c 

koo 



1 



-7- 



Dept., Office, 
Board , or 
Commission 

FIRE DEPT. 

HEALTH SERVICE 
SYSTEM • 



HETCH HETCHY 



HOUSING APPEALS 
HOUSING AUTH. 



JUVENILE 
PROBATION 



LEGION OF HONOR 
MUNICIPAL COURT 



MUNICIPAL 
RAILWAY 



Type 

of 

Record 

Commission minutes 



Membership records 

Medical claims cover 

pages 

IBM membership cards 

Water resources 



Trust funds, accounts 

receivable 

Board minutes 

Trustee minutes 

Court cases, last 
10 years 

Registers of actions, 
indexes and minute 
books 

Active traffic fines 
Record of Exhibits 



Plant ledgers 
Contracts, leases 
Farebox change records 
Computer programs 
Claimant's index cards 
Master cross 
index cards 



Total 



36 



21 



26 
21 

11 



Financial 

Contracts 

Deeds, etc. 

Raker Act 

Lands and 

Rights-of-way 

Engineering drawings 


4 
1 

19 
3 

8 

1 


Engineering, 
project records 


40 


Minutes 


1 


Board minutes 
Lease documents 


17 

4o 



L070 



762 



NOT Safe- 
guarded 
by Pre- 
servation 
Copies 

36 



21 

26 
21 

11 

4 
1 

19 
3 





1 

17 
4o 



1070 



762 



390 


390 


1 


1 


4 


4 


2 


2 


4 


4 


18 


18 


4 


4 



Safe- 
guarded 
by Pre- 
servation 
Copies 





40 














NOT Safe- 


Safe- 








guarded 


guarded 


Dept., Office, 


Type 




by Pre- 


by Pre- 


Board , or 


of 




servation 


servation 


Commission 


Record 


Total 


Copies 


Copies 


PARKING 




AUTHORITY 


Authority minutes 


2 


2 





PERMIT APPEALS 


Board minutes 


2 


2 





POLICE DEPT. 


Commission minutes 


36 


36 





PUBLIC HEALTH 


Birth certificates 


615 


110 


515 




Death certificates 


535 


100 


^35 




Mental health 


1 


1 







Active hospital 










medical cases 


1500 


1500 





PUBLIC LIBRARY 


Commission minutes 


6 


6 





PUBLIC WORKS 


DPV7 minutes 


97 


97 







Orders 


75 


75 







Contracts 


350 


350 







Non-duplicated 










accounting records 


&*0 


640 







Architecture 


1425 


1425 







Engineering 


605 


600 


5 




Industrial waste 










disposal 


2 


2 







Building inspection 


1*3 


143 







Building permits 


3150 


3150 







House numbers 


37 


37 





PUC GENERAL 










OFFICE 


Commission minutes 


13 


13 







Index to minutes 


3 


3 





PURCHASER 


Purchase order 










register 


2 


2 







Contracts 


1 


1 







Equipment inventory 


6 


6 







Auto control 


2 


2 







Service agreements 


1 


1 





REAL ESTATE 


Property 


19 


19 







Leases, agreements 


2 


2 





RECREATION- 










PARK 


Commission minutes 


11 


11 







Legal documents 


k 


4 


Q 


REDEVELOPMENT 


Minutes 


1 


1 







Legal documents 


2 


2 






-9- 



Dept., Office, 
Board , or 
Commission 

RETIREMENT 
SYSTEM 



SHERIFF 
TREASURER 



WAR MEMORIAL 
WATER DEPT. 



WELFARE 



Typo 

of 

Record 



Membership 
Active tab cards 
Compensation 
Miscellaneous 

Jail inmates 

Bonds pledged as 
collateral 
5213,000,000, 
Retirement System 
bonds 5289,000,000, 
Treasurer's 
correspondence 
Teller's reports 
Inheritance tax 
records 

Accounting records, 
reports, etc. 

Trustee minutes 

Service records - map 

books, connections 

Service - tap books 

by streets, also 

numerical 

Engineering records 

Contracts 

Project specifications 

Property valuation 

books 

Deed records 

Water rights, etc. 

Plant ledgers 

Commission minutes 
Current recipient 
card records 
Active case records 





NOT Safe- 


Safe- 




guarded 


guarded 




by Pre- 


by Pre- 




servation 


servation 


Total 


Copies 


Copies 


82 


82 





61 


61 





117 


117 





21 


21 






16 
8 


16 
8 







8 


8 





8 


8 





7 


7 






ko 



ko 



8 


8 





10 


10 





10 


10 





20 


20 





1 


1 





.00 


100 





15 


15 





10 


10 






48 
1525 



48 
1525 



TOTALS 



31373 



:S8iii 



'MS 



-10- 



RECORDS CENTER 
1965-66 

The R->cords Center was established 15 years ago by ordinance of the 
Board of Supervisors. This ordinance, now comprising Chapter 8 of the San 
Francisco Administrative Code, authorizes the Chief Administrative Officer 
to establish, maintain and operate within a department under his jurisdic- 
tion a Records Center for the "orderly storage, care, management and safe- 
guarding of storage records of the departments and offices of the City and 
County and of the San Francisco Unified School District." The Chief Admin- 
istrative Officer has delegated to the Director of Finance and Records the 
authority to administer the operations and personnel of the Records Center. 
Two Clerks and a Principal Clerk comprise the Center's staff. 

Under provisions of the Administrative Code, services of the Records 
Center are provided without charge, including storage boxes, transportation 
of boxes and reference services. Paper records are stored at Ikk Townsend 
and 930 Bryant Streets, where the combined capacity is 33,600 cubic feet 
(storage boxes), and at the old Municipal Railway streetcar barn, Geary 
Boulevard and Masonic Avenue, where not more than 3i000 cubic feet can be 
stored. 

Microfilm records are stored in the underground vault beneath the 
Municipal Railway's Forest Hill station. Most microfilm images are on 
100-foot, l6-mm. reels and placed in cartons 2" x k" x 1" in size. These 
cartons are stored in fireproof metal safes which have combination locks. 
Double fireproof doors protect against unauthorized entry to the vault room, 
wherein temperature and humidity controls have been provided. 

NEEDS OF THE RECORDS CENTER 

It would be highly desirable to consolidate the paper records at one 
storage location, rather than the present three, which complicates our 
reference service — especially without a vehicle. 

The Records Center very sorely needs a vehicle for thrice-daily use 
in delivery and pickup of requested files to and from City Hall. In addition, 
the vehicle is needed for necessary trips to the three warehouses, the Hall 
of Justice, the Forest Hill station vault, and to pick up the occasional 
small loads of "new" records that various departments accumulate and usually 
wish to move quickly to the Records Center. 

The present practice is to engage movers, at expensive hourly rates, 
to move the "new" records. As for the thrice-daily delivery and pickup at 
City Hall, public transportation is used. This sometimes requires a Records 
Center employee to carry, on a public bus, a heavily-laden briefcase, plus 
a 20-pound bound volume such as a Minute Book of the Superior Court — a 
heavy load to balance in a moving bus, and something of a menace to other 
passengers. (Employees* autos are not always available or suitable for such 
heavy use.) Thus, it is earnestly hoped that approval may be obtained as 
soon as possible to acquire a vehicle for the Records Center. 



-11- 



MICROFILMING POLICY ON "PERMANENT" RECORDS 

Also of immediate concern is an effort to obtain consent from depart- 
ments concerned in disposal of old records that have no further use, or which 
are not required by law to be kept any longer. Of equal concern is an effort 
to urge departments to microfilm records which must be kept indefinitely. It 
is less costly to microfilm records that must be kept *f0 or more years. 

The Board of Supervisors has adopted as policy the recommendations 
that any sizable quantities of records that must be kept indefinitely, should 
be microfilmed. This plan provides for one microfilm copy to be retained in 
the department for daily reference and a duplicate copy to be stored in the 
Record Center's underground vault as a preservation copy in event the original 
film copy is lost or destroyed. 

This program, if supported with the necessary appropriation of funds 
to do the microfilming work, will relieve the overcrowding at the Records 
Center, where, for example, ko per cent of the storage volume consists of 
Superior Court records in paper form that must be kept indefinitely. If 
microfilmed, a film copy would be available at all times in the County Clerk's 
office. Records on microfilm require only one-sixtieth of the storage space 
required by those same records in paper form. A security copy also would 
be provided. And the twice-daily trips between the Records Center and the 
County Clerk's office would be eliminated. In fiscal 1965-66, there were 
18,059 references to paper records of the Superior Court stored at the 
Records Center. 

Records in storage totaled 35 1 317 cubic feet as of June 30, 1966 
(see next page). Capacity is 36,600 cubic feet. A breakdown of records 
in storage follows: 



-12- 



RECORDS IN STORAGE AS OF JUNE 30, I966 

KICPOFILM 
DEPARTMENT (100' Reels) 

Adult Probation 

Art 

Assessor 38.5 

Board of Permit Appeals 

Board of Supervisors 70.0 

Calif. Palace of Legion of Honor . .3 
Chief Administrative Officer . . . 

City Attorney 

City Planning 23.5 

Civil Service 7.8 

Controller 17.6 

DeYoung Museum .8 

District Attorney ... 

Electricity 3.3 

Fair Employment 

Finance & Records: 

County Clerk (Superior Court) . . 55 « 5 

Recorder 2,754.0 

Registrar of Voters . 

Public Administrator 

Tax Collector ..... 7.8 

Weights and Measures ...... 

Law Library 6.0 

Mayor ... 

Municipal Court 55.0 

Public Defender ..... 

Public Health 

Child Psychiatric Clinic .... 

Crippled Children's Services . . 

City Clinic ... 

Laguna Honda 

Other health services 15.0 

S.F. General Hospital 

Public Utilities 

Airport 1.5 

Bur. of Light, Heat and Power. . . 2.5 

General Office P.U.C 

Hetch Hetchy 15.0 

Municipal Railway 3»5 

Utilities Engineering Bureau. . . 525.0 

Water 74.0 

Public Welfare 

Public Works: 

Army Street Office . 

Engineering Office . 

Main Office 55.8 

Sewer Repair Dlrision ...... 

Purchasing 

Real Estate 

Recreation and Park 6.5 

Retirement System 8.5 83 2 

Schools 'Hfcs* 

Sheriff ;>/& l,46l 37 

Superior Court (Sec 'y. Records). . 2.3 RR 1t - 

Youth Guidance Center loo -i? 

TOTALS . . . 4,170.0 35,317 27722Z 
-13- 



P..\PER RECORDS 


1965-66 


(Cubic Feet) 


References 


268 


9<* 


16 




7^ 


28 


11 




535 


41 


6 




776 


227 


100 


37 


901 


298 


6,009 


9<+ 


26 




4 




13,651 


18,059 


49 


1 


381 


116 


1,5^9 


684 


4 




12 




3,91^ 


2,837 


33 


1 


168 


62 


125 


1,571 


3lA 


2,584 


270 


64 


lflt 




1,918 


157 


97 




<+7 


3 


352 


67 


196 




29 




4l6 


12 


151 




41 




3 




1,070 


128 


105 


3 



COUNTY CLERK 

The County Clerk's Office serves as the ministerial arm and office of 
record of the Superior Court of the City and County of San Francisco. In 
addition, certain statutory indices are maintained, the principal ones being 
the Corporation index, the Partnerships and Fictitious Names index, and the 
index of Notaries Public. Marriage licenses are issued by this department. 
Branch offices are maintained at the Hall of Justice, the Youth Guidance Center 
and at San Francisco General Hospital. 

After several years careful study, the Legislature passed a revised fee 
bill at the last session. The new schedule became effective October 6, 1966. 
This will increase the revenue of the office approximately 35 per cent. 

The last Legislature also added two new Superior judges to the San 
Francisco bench, increasing the complement to 2it» One new judge will be assigned 
to handle the ever increasing work load at the Hall of Justice, the other will 
hear civil cases in the City Hall. These new jud?es will require additional 
clerical help and the County Clerk's office is initiating a supplementary budget 
request to cover the increased costs. 

The County Clerks in the State of California were successful in their 
campaign to preserve their constitutional status as Clerks of the Superior 
Court in the proposed revision of the Constitution, which will be submitted to 
the electorate in November 1966 as ballot proposition 1A. 

3 Year Summary Comparison 1963 -6U 196it-6j> 1965-66 

Superior Court Proceedings: 
Civil actions and petitions 
Probate petitions 
Criminal actions 
Juv. petns. no. of children 
Psychiatric petitions 
Appeals to Superior Court 
Marriage licenses issued 

Detailed operations of the various divisions of the County Clerk's 
Office are shown below: 

CASHIER'S DIVISION 

The revenue from fees collected in 1965-66 increased from 3271,673 
to $277,077. A comparative statement of fee revenue follows: 



11,289 


11,768 


11,719 


3,836 


3,996 


U,30U 


2,05U 


2,23U 


2,u5l 


2,659 


2,503 


2,833 


3,853 


2,868 


1,800 


nil 


152 


271 


7,201 


7,618 


7,629 



-14- 



CASEIN'S DIVISION (Cont'd.) 1963-61* 1961*-65 1965-66 



Probate Department 


P 8U,1*51* 


; 90,U*6 


b 91,1*26 


General Department 


122,298 


128,31*5 


127,01*6 


Civil Department 


UU,097 


hi*, 997 


50,51*0 


karriage License Dept. * 


7,203 


7,618 


7,629 


Professional Registrations 


1*29 


267 


U36 



Total Office Fees -,258,1*81 $271,673 .277,077 

* karriage License Fees are now collected by the 
Recorder's Office. 

Fines, Law Library Fees and 1963 -61* 196U-65 19 65-6 6 

Collections for Other Departments : 

Carriage License Fees 
Juvenile Court Fines 
Juvenile Court Traffic Fines 
Crim. Dept. Fines and Forfeitures 
Peace Officers Training Fund 
Payments to State Dept .of Pub. Health 

(Sec. 26859 Govt. Code) 
Law Library Fees 
Sup. Ct. Reporters Salary Fund 

Total Fees and Fines Collected 

Trust Fund Deposits: 
Civil Court Deposits & Jury Fees 
Criminal 3ail Deposits, Cash & Bonds 

Total koney Collected jl, 822,726 ,?2, 1*95, 763 £-2,238,1*90 

Exempt Services. No Fees Collected $ 26,91*1 \? 31,973 % 33,760 



GENERAL DIVISION 

New Civil actions filed during the past fiscal year totaled 11,719 
compared with 11,768 in 1961*-65. A breakdown of other filings follows: 

1963-6U 196U-65 1965-66 

Civil Actions 11,289 

Adoptions 369 

Certificates of Incorporation 1,038 
Cts.of Copartnership & Fie. Names 1,186 
Official and Notarial Bonds 1,070 

Oaths of Office 1,1*11 



? 7,203 

12,335 

85,hl*9 

1*,555 

i 1,273 


■■■ 7,618 

530 

13,320 

50,560 

3,639 

1,21*5 


- 7,629 

100 

12,853 

57,360 

5,31*1* 

3,688 


65,007 
211*, 653 


67,721* 
222,139 


68,21*1 
223,61*1* 


761*9,700 


638,1*1*8 


655,936 


1,168,626 
U,l*oo 


1,81*9,065 
8,250 


1,525,351* 
57,200 



11,768 


11,719 


31*0 


3U2 


91*9 


850 


1,11*1 


1,110 


1,1*81* 


1,168 


1,863 


1,616 



-15- 



Following is a breakdown by character of civil actions filed: 

1963 -6u 196U-65 1965-66 

Over 53,000 to ,?5,000 
tore than :5,000 
Divorce 

Annulment 

Separate Maintenance 

All Other Actions 

Totals 11,289 11,768 11,719 



28 


60 


77 


5,278 


5,851 


5,81*9 


3,160 


2,975 


3,006 


518 


U35 


W*0 


213 


181* 


178 


2,092 


2,263 


2,169 



CIVIL DIVISION 



1963 -6U 



196L-65 



1965-66 



Disposition of Civil Actions: 
Judgts. by Jury on Verdict 
Judgts. rise. after Ct. Hearings 
Judgts. on Default 
Dismissals by Parties 
Trsfrd.to other Jurisdictions 
Sep. ttaint. Judgts. Grtd. 
Annulments of I arriajre Grtd. 
Interloc .Decrees of Div.Grtd. 
Final Decrees of Div. Grtd. 

Appeals to District and Supreme 
Courts from Superior Court 

Appeals Disposed of: 
Affirmed 
Modified 

Reversed 
Dismissed 



367 


368 


368 


1,69U 


1,985 


2,568 


75 


13U 


106 


3,103 


3,980 


3,867 


270 


25U 


282 


U2 


30 


23 


Ul 8 


379 


383 


2,1x13 


2,U31 


2,2h3 


2,171* 


2,13U 


2,155 



22U 



238 



291 



66 


U8 


53 


h 


2 


8 


25 


27 


28 


1x9 


h2 


la 



PROBATE DIVISION 

New Estate and guardianship proceedings amounted to li,30U compared 
with 3,996 for the previous fiscal year. 



1963 -6U 



196U-65 



1965-66 



Probate Proceedings Filed: 
Testate 
Intestate 


1,982 
1,226 


2,135 
1,189 


2,202 
1,222 


Missing Persons 


- 


3 


6 


Guardianship Proceedings Filed: 
i-inor 

Incompetent 
Conservator 


163 
31x9 
116 


161 
339 
169 


187 
U77 
210 



-16- 



PR03ATE DIVISION (Cont'd.) 

1963 -6U 196U-65 



1965-66 



.etters Issued: 








Testamentary 


1,771 


I,fi03 


1,966 


Administration 


938 


892 


889 


Administration with Will Annexed 


301 


292 


265 


Special 


237 


11*7 


155 


Guardianship 


507 


522 


m 


Conservator 


105 


188 


230 



CRIMINAL DIVISION 

Three Courts hear criminal matters daily at the Hall of Justice. 
Statistics below are based on number of defendants: 



1963 -6U 



New Actions Filed 
Informations 
Indictments 

Cert, from Luni. Ct. for Judgt. 
Cert, from luni. Ct. for Hearing on 

Sexual Psychopathy 
Pets, for Cert, of Rehabilitation 
Cert, from Kuni. Ct. for Hearing on 

Present Sanity 
Cert, from Muni. Ct. to Determine 

Narcotic Addiction 

Disposition of Cases: 
Convicted after Pleas of Nolo 

Contendere 
Convicted after Pleas of Guilty 
Convicted after Court Trials 
Convicted after Jury Trials 
Dismissed 

Transferred to other Jurisdictions 
Acquitted after Court Trials 
Acquitted after Jury Trials 
Sentenced to County Jail 
Sentenced to State Prison 
Judgments of Death 
Sentenced by Fines 
Committed to Youth Authority 
Committed as Sexual Psychopaths 
Committed as Insane 
Prob. Grtd., inc. Conditional Prob. 
Certs, of Rehabilitation Granted 
Committed re: Narcotic Addiction 



196U-65 



1965-66 



2,05h 


2,23U 


2,u5i 


1,511* 


1,705 


1,929 


37k 


362 


3U0 


26 


23 


29 


9 


13 


13 


7 


2 


6 


111 


108 


126 


13 


21 


8 


6 


20 


20 


1,362 


1,270 


1,1*10 


356 


313 


321 


9L 


iil» 


eu 


197 


297 


320 


9 


3 


9 


131 


126 


11*5 


30 


52 


33 


395 


352 


309 


280 


279 


228 


_ 


- 


1 


8 


5 


I* 


59 


8U 


69 


8 


la 


9 


68 


67 


7U 


932 


8U3 


1,01*3 


7 


h 


6 


7U 


77 


110 



-17- 



CRIMNAL DIVISION (Cont'd.) 
1963-6U 



'^56,263 
2!*,500 



28 



196U-65 



*;Uo,a88 

6,000 



37 



1965-66 



U5,329 
16,226 



65 



Fines and Bail Forfeitures Collected: 
Fines and Assessments 
Bail Forfeitures 

Petitions for Writs of Habeas 
Corpus Filed: 

Appeals to State Appellate Court: 
Pending at Beginning of Year 
Filed During the Year 

Disposition of Appeals: 
Affirmed 
Reversed 
Dismissed 
Pending 
Abandoned 
Modified 

Coroner's Transcripts Filed 

JUVENILE COURT DIVISION 

The Juvenile Court meets every day at the Youth Guidance Center, 
375 Woodside Avenue, San Francisco. Statistics folio;;: 



51 


75 


123 


70 


110 


105 


21 


22 


U2 


7 


12 


12 


11 


2U 


U2 


75 


123 


128 


1 


2 


- 


6 


2 


h 


81 


206 


38U 



1963 -61* 



196h-65 



1965-66 



Petitions Filed: 








Ptns. for Comm. of Dependent 








Children 


U81 


U99 


U82 


Number of Children 


823 


85U 


825 


Ptns. Filed on Delinquent 








Children 


1,836 


1,659 


2,008 


Number of Children 


1,836 


1,659 


2,008 


Suppl. ptns. Filed on Delinquent 








and Dependent Children 


2,297 


2,178 


1,332 


Hearings by the Court: 








Detention 


— 


— 


2,798 


Special 


— 


— 


56U 


Adoptions 


— 


— 


300 


Guardianships 


— 


— 


liO 


Other Civil hatters 


— 


— 


li 



Number of records sealed 
Juvenile Traffic Hearings: 

Moving violations 

Fines Collected 



5,361 
$12,850 



1*,970 
: 13, 2 75 



106 

U,531 
?12,591» 



-18- 



STATE HOSPITAL COURT DIVISION 

The State Hospital Court meets at 9:30 Ah every day at San Francisco 
General Hospital, 2li50 Twenty-second Street. The Courtroom Clerk is in 
attendance from 8 AJVi to $ Pto Monday through Friday. 



1963 -6U 



196U-65 



1965-66 



Alleged Insane Persons: 








Examinations 


2,Oii9 


1,686 


1,U38 


Committed to State Hospitals 


1,592 


1,176 


812 


Examined and Discharged 


li57 


510 


626 


Intemperance and Use of Drugs: 








Examinations 


1,786 


1,11*5 


313 


Committed to State Hospitals 


1,5U6 


933 


195 


Examined and Discharged 


2U0 


212 


118 


Feeble Minded; 








Examinations 


18 


37 


U9 


Comm. to Homes for Feeble Mnded 


18 


37 


h.9 



APPELLATE DIVISION 



Three judges of the San Francisco Superior Court appointed by the 
Judicial Council, sit each Friday morning as the Aopellate Department of the 
Superior Court. Appeals from the I unicipal Court, Criminal and Civil, are 
heard by the Appellate Division. Appeals from the Small Claims Court are 
tried de novo. 



Civil Appeals from Muni Court 
Filed During the Year: 



1963 -6U 



UU 



196 u -65 



U7 



1965-66 



56 



Disposition of Appeals: 
Affirmed 
Modified 
Reversed 
Dismissed 
Rehearings Denied 
Under Submission or Pending 

Criminal Appeals from tftini Court 
Filed During the Year: 



30 


19 


30 


2 





1 


19 


10 


11 


7 


9 


Hi 


5 


6 


7 


2 


9 


13 



3U 



56 



157 



-19- 



APPELLATE DIVISION (Cont'd.) 

1963 -6U 196U-65 



1965-66 



Disposition of Appeals: 








Affirmed 


2U 


28 


50 


Reversed 


8 


10 


8 


Dismissed 


2 


3 


83 


Pending 


8 


Hi 


15 


Modified 


1 








Abandoned 


3 


l 


1 


Appeals from Small Claims Court 


36 


U9 


58 


Disposition of Small Claims Appeals: 








Affirmed 


21 


22 


28 


Reversed 


12 


12 


19 


Dismissed 


6 


8 


9 


Under Submission or Pending 


3 


7 


9 



LICENSE DIVISION 

Marriage licenses issued in 1965-66 totaled 7,629, only 11 more than 
the previous fiscal year. There were 2li55 decrees of divorce entered, or 
321 more than in 196U-65. 



Marriage Licenses Issued 
Professional Registrations 



1963 -6U 

7,201 

182 



196U-65 

7,618 
18? 



1965-66 

7,629 
218 



-20- 



RECORDER 
1965-66 



The Recorder's office, as required by law, receives for recording all 
papers or notices that may legally be recorded, makes and keeps a true copy of 
the original, indexes the same, and arranges the books of record and indices 
in suitable places to facilitate their inspection. 

A program for microfilming old records dating back to the 1906 fire was 
started in 1960-61. Funds to continue this project were appropriated in the 
1961-62, 1962-63, 1963-61*, 1961*-65, and 1965-66 budgets, and 1,1*70 old record 
books were microfilmed in 1965-66. 

The two principal long-range objectives of the Recorder's office are 
(l) the conversion from the handwritten "Cott" system general indices to 
printed absolute alphabetical indices prepared by mechanical means (this would 
increase the legibility of the most vital records in the office and provide much 
better service to the public); (2) the completion of our current project of 
microfilming all of the old records. When this is finished, valuable dead 
storage space will be released for working areas . 

'Profit' of £3 9, 571* -1*3 

The Recorder's office continued in 1965-66 to show an excess of receipts 
over expenses, the amount being v39,57i*.l*3 • Receipts from recording and filing 
fees totaled ,;231,OU0.10 or 21$ more than the expenditures of *191,U65.67. The 
breakdown of receiots follows: 

Receipts 1963-61* 196U-65 1965-66 

Recording fees §266,530.80 $252,986.1*0 $209,81*0.20 

Special Service fees 11,277.85 12,058.00 13,571.90 

Marriage license recording fees.. 7,203.00 7,318.00 7,628.00 

$285,011.65 ,272,362.1*0 >231,01*0.10 

Expenditures 

Salaries $162,259.00 ;i68, 1*58.03 ,177,119.80 

Other 21,730.7a 18,512.16 ll*, 31*5-87 

?183,989.71* -.186,970.19 ^191,1*65.67 

Excess, receipts over expenditures'^101,021.91 $ 85,392.21 $ 39, 571*. 1*3 



-21- 



Receipts listed do not include desk rental fees collected last fiscal 
year by the Real Estate Department in the amount of „1,830, for desk space in 
the Recorder's office used by title companies, record searchers, etc. Neither 
do they include 511,71x3.90 estimated work for 3,161 papers (lx,lx02 pages) of 
"official", or free recordings; that is, the service rendered to war veterans, 
dependents of war veterans, compensation and pension claims, old age pension 
claims and miscellaneous Federal, State or other political subdivision record- 
ings; which service is required by state law to be performed without fees. 

An additional ?250 could be added for other free work performed as a 
courtesy to other City and County departments. 

The monthly breakdown of recording and filing fee receipts follows: 

1963-6U 196U-65 1965-66 





$ 25,52U.75 


$ 21,979.70 


August .... 25,583.50 


22,3Wi.05 


20,81x9.70 


September . 21,060.30 


20,868.50 


18,299.30 


October ... 26,2lxlx.30 


23,123.30 


20,203.20 


November .. 20,816.1x5 


21, 351; .00 


19,627.25 


December .. 23,178^1x5 


22,922.30 


20,861.30 


January ... 2lx, 075-15 


21,601.70 


18,609.30 


February .. 22,115.90 


21,481.90 


17,1x02.1x5 




2U,620.55 


21,521.70 




23,979.55 


18,871.75 




21,164.35 


16,251 .ho 




23,377.1x5 


16,363.05 


>2 85, Oil. 65 


•3272,362 .Uo 


$231,01x0.10 


Documents Filed and Recorded 







The following are the principal classifications of the 101,61x0 docu- 
ments filed and recorded during 1965-66. For comparative purposes, lists for 
two preceding fiscal years are included: 

1963 -6U 196U-65 1965-6 6 

Affidavits of Death 1,335 1,157 1,268 

Agreements 362 360 279 

Decrees 2,027 2,088 1,063 

Deeds 18,379 18,390 llx,877 

Deeds of Trust 22,lxOlx 22,565 17,1x06 

Judgments and Abstracts 2,380 2,663 2,961 

Miscellaneous 39,1x71 37,173 36,779 

Military Discharges 706 526 1x32 

Financial Statements 12,279 ll,251x 7,275 

Mortgages of Real Property 552 1x67 1x16 

Notices of Default 1,113 l,5l8 1,531 

Reconveyances 21,159 20,271 l6,20lx 

Tax Liens - Federal 1,21x6 1,117 1,11x9 

Total 123,103 119,81x9 101,610 



-22- 



The figures below show recordings of deeds, mortga es, and deeds of 
trust for the past 10 years: 



Fiscal Year 


Deeds 


Mortgages 


Deeds of Trust 


1956-57 


17,827 


716 


1Jj,983 


1957-58 


16,516 


653 


1U,188 


195^-59 


18,308 


807 


17,097 


1959-60 


17,350 


663 


16,791 


1960-61 


17,1U7 


525 


18,710 


1961-62 


18,680 


51i8 


21,9U2 


1962-63 


19,707 


586 


2U,175 


1963-6U 


18,379 


552 


22,hOU 


196I|-65 


18,390 


U67 


22,565 


3 965-66 


1U,877 


Ul6 


17,U06 



The following table lists the number of marriages performed 
Francisco since 19U6-U7: 



19U6-U7 11,038 

19h7-h8 9,629 

19U8-U9 8,h65 

19U9-50 7,397 

1950-51 8,195 

1951-52 7,220 

1952-53 7,359 

1953-5U 6,711 

195U-55 6,686 

1955-56 6,526 



1956-57 6,895 

1957-58 6,502 

1958-59 6,595 

1959-60 6,629 

1960-61 6,538 

1961-62 6,602 

1962-63 6,786 

1963-6U 7,215 

196U-65 7,160 

1965-66 7,377 



-23- 



ANNUAL REPORT 
DEPARTMENT CF HEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Fiscal Year 1965-66 

San Francisco's weights and Measures Department, 
which was started in 1915, has a staff consisting of the sealer, 
a senior inspector, six inspectors, a senior clerk- typist . 
All work out of an office in the City Hall, The peroaapita 
cost for operation of this department was less than 110 in 
fiscal 1964-65. 

Weights and Measures is charged with enforcing 
provisions of the State of California Business and Professions 
Code and the California Administrative code as these codes 
relate to the quantity delivered in commercial transactions, 
public v/eighmaster supervision, labeling, anti-freeze, gasoline 
and oil substitution, brake fluid and other allied responsi- 
bilities. 

The //eights and Measures slogan is 'That Equity 
May Prevail". "Equity", in this instance, is dependent upon 
the actions of producer, manufacturer, and distributor, 
balanced by the actions of the consumer and the weights and 
measures official. This includes everyone in business, from 
producing through wholesaling and retailing; everyone who is 
a consumer, from the householder buying groceries, to a trucker 
buying gasoline or diesel fuel. 

T ested and Sealed Annually N 

Weights and Measures law requires that all commercial 
weighing and measuring devices be tested and sealed at least 
once during the year. We have endeavored to fulfill this 
requirement, including calls and retests of equipment after 
repairs to make certain that all weighing and measuring equip- 
ment was correct and that all false and incorrect equipment 
was either corrected and sealed to accuracy, or was condemned. 

It is our duty to cooperate with and advise com- 
mercial interests in the proper use of weighing ^.nd measuring 
devices for specific purposes and to enforce the statutes 
regarding their use. An intelligent understanding of this 
use by commercial interests is essential. 

It is just as important for customers to receive 
correct weight or measure when buying as it is to receive 
correct change. The buying public would be outraged if 
short changed everytime they made a purchase but they can 
be sold short weight ond never realize they are actually 
being robbed. 



-24- 



Protecting; the Interests of Consumers 

It is our obligation to assist consumers to receive 
full value for money paid. It is self-evident that when 
consumers are educated to look for zero balances on scales 
with no loads, seals of approval prominently displayed and 
proper labeling, they protect themselves by avoiding these 
expensive pitfalls. 

This department makes sure by regular, systematic 
inspection that all citizens, merchants and consumers .'like, 
receive protection from faulty weighing and i suring Pjvices, 
careless use thereof, and from the fraudulent practices of 
those few who would take unfair advantage of not only their 
competitors '■ but also -he consumer in his daily purchases of 
the necessities of life. 

The American housewife today has a choice of some 
8,000 items when she visits the local super market, and come 
authorities believe that this number will increase to 12,000 
by 1975. This almost revolutionary change in marketing in 
the past 20 years presents the consumer with the responsibility 
of knowing and understanding the facts if these products are 
to be selected with wisdom. 

Importance of Packaged Commodities Inspection 

One of the most important considerations is the 
quantity contained. Unless a housewife is accurately informed, 
she will not be able to make value comparisons. We, therefore, 
devote a major part of our time and energy in continuous 
inspection of packaged commodities. We feel that in San 
Francisco purchasers of packaged commodities are receiving 
correct weight in almost all instances. 

Weights and measures service is one of dignity, 
purpose, and integrity in matters of public concern. Before 
each of us can feel satisfied that we have done the best we 
can in fulfilling the responsibility of our position, we 
must establish and maintain good public relations. We _^ust 
inform the people of the value of weights and sun 3S protec- 
tion - to each person, individually, and bo he ccaaunity 
at large. Our promotion activities are dedicated to the 
improvement of the public service for which we are responsible. 
Because this Department plays such an important role in the 
taxpayers every day existence through work devoted in its 
entirety to saving the taxpayers' money, the title "Protector 
of the Fublic Pocketbook" is a good description of your 
Department of Weights and Measures. 

Testing, Weighing Devices Slowly Changing 

Our operation is faced with the problems involved 



-25- 



in industrial automation and the requirements of compatibility 
with computers. In the next 20 years there will not be a 
giant replacement of existing equipment and techniques. A 
large number of the scales and meters that are in service 
today will still be in use at that time but we know that 
many of the devices now used to determine quantity will be 
replaced by devices capable of producing automatically 
printed records going to such lengths as a housewife being 
able to do her shopping by pushing buttons which will result 
in her order, with weight and price computed and delivered 
to her bagged and ready to go. 

fhese problems, of course, will require the con- 
tinuous training of our inspectors to enable weights and 
measures protection of the whole public to continue at a 
high level if our economy is to endure. 

It seems appropriate at this time to ask that 
these obligations be given consideration in future employment, 
salary, and equipment budget requests. 

Following is a consolidation of our 196>-66 work: 



-26- 



There were 46 complaints received and adjusted in 
1965-66 by departmental inspectors and 51 "orders to 
conform" issued* A total of 2,059,899 packages was 
inspected, of which 81,650 were found to' be ""light". 



Type 



Sealed Adjusted Condemn 



Scales: 

Counter 2,423 

Spring 2,000 

Computing 5,026 

Heavy capacity . . . 5,011 

Person weighers . . . 264 

Prescription (Drugs). 295 



Weights ; 
Drug . . 
Commercial 



,10,850 
.12,133 



Measures : 
Retail Pumps . . 
Grease Meters ) 
Lube Oil Meters ) 
Yardage Meters 
Liquid Measures . 
Wholesale Meters 
Taximeters . . . 



4,905 

616 

126 

1,933 

10 

6 



338 
288 
476 
416 
65 
22 





90 



97 
o 



.ncd 


Confiscated 


106 


2 


14 





69 


3 


217 


8 


56 


2 


7 








46 





56 


285 


1 


7 





5 


1 





1 








6 






Totals 43,596 



1,799 



772 



120 



Comparison of Workload Factors 



Certificates Issued .... 
Scales Tested 

Weights Inspected .... 
Gas Pumps Inspected .... 
Other Measuring Devices Tested 
Containers Inspected . . . 
Miscellaneous - Other Calls 



1963-64 


1964-65 


1965-66 


11,908 


15,870 


14,469 


15,593 


12,804 


15,134 


18,234 


24 , 342 


23,167 


5,733 


5,375 


5,285 


3,646 


3,718 


2,641 



1,090,436 1,844,811 2,059,899 



1,250 



1,450 



1,827 



-27- 



COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

AGRICULTURAL COMMISSIONER 

1965-1966 

The general purposes and responsibilities of this department include the 
following: 

To promote and protect the agricultural industry. 

To protect and benefit both the grower and the consumer 
by enforcing the provisions of the Agricultural Code. 

Within the authority delegated to us, to further and 
protect the health and welfare of our citizens. 

The Agricultural Commissioner is a County Officer; as such, he heads the 
County Department of Agriculture. Re must plan and direct staff members in the 
proper enforcement of all provisions of the California State Agricultural Code 
and the City and County regulations which pertain to the office of the County 
Agricultural Commissioner. This includes the inspection of fruits, vegetables, 
eggs, nuts, honey, poultry and rabbit meats in wholesale and retail establish- 
ments; the inspection of nurseries, seed firms, apiaries, poet offices, express 
and freight terminals, for plant diseases, insect pests and plant quarantine 
requirements; the conducting of insect pest surveys and the maintaining of var- 
ious insect traps; and the certification of agricultural products being ex- 
ported to foreign countries in order to meet the requirements of freedom from 
pests and diseases. 

The Agricultural Commissioner, under the California Disaster Plan, is 
designated as the County Food administrator under the supervision of the Cali- 
fornia Director of Agriculture. One of his duties is to compile a food inven- 
tory of wholesale firms and private and public warehouses, which has been com- 
pleted by this department. There are 160 such firms end warehouses in San 
Francisco. The information was placed on data processing cards and is available 
for use in time of disaster. 

The export certification work has increased slightly. This is due to 
additional money being released to importers in the foreign countries to pur- 
chase agricultural commodities. 

The number of retail stores inspected as to fruit, vegetables, eggs, 
honey, and poultry meat, has increased. 

The San Francisco Wholesale Produce Terminal is operating at full capa- 
city at its Islais Creek location since it opened in October 1963. This loca- 
tion has enabled us to make inspections more efficiently, and it has facilitated 
our work. 

Revenue From Two Sources : 

Revenue received in 1965-66 consisted of $3,300.00 from the State to aug- 
ment the salary of the San Francisco Agricultural Commissioner, and o5, 162.83 
from export certification fees. 

-28- 



In addition to the duties listed above, the Chief Administrative Officer 
has delegated to the Agricultural Commissioner the supervision of the Farmers' 

Market, including its functions and personnel. 

Following is a comparison breakdown of inspection services provided: 

PLAICT QUARANTINE 

All shipments of nursery stock and plants, plant products including fruit, 
seed and grain, used agricultural implements and appliances; are required to be 
held for inspection upon first arrival in the county in order to prevent the 
entry of plant diseases, insects, noxious weeds or seeds, which may be detri- 
mental to agriculture. The post office, railway express, freight yards and com- 
mercial trucking concerns are visited daily for this inspection. In addition, 
many plants are inspected at nurseries. 

In many cases treatment can be applied to plants rejected, thus insuring 
cleanliness; and the commodities may then be released. 

Plant Quarantine 1963-64 1964-65 1965-66 



Number of Premises 


235 


236 


236 


Shipments Inspected 


8,896 


11,899 


7,537 


Plants Inspected 


13,713,356 


9,103,516 


8,910,645 


Plants Rejected 


6,620 


145,075 


4,219 


Total Man tours 


1,924 


1,859 


1,659 




STAIIHARDIZATIOII 





This is one of the major functions of this department. It relates to the 
inspection of fruits, nuts, vegetables, eggs, poultry meat, and honey, at the 
wholesale produce terminal, retail stores, and any other place where produce is 
offered for sale. This is to insure the enforcement of the requirements govern- 
ing the quality, packing and marketing of these products. We inspect and cer- 
tify loads of commodities moving interstate or intrastate; and to foreign 
countries when requested by shippers, to show compliance with California's 
standardization requirements. 

Wholesale Produce Market : 1965-64 1964-65 1965-66 

Number of Premises 45 45 46 

Premises Inspected 10,712 10,626 11,454 

Rejection Tags 1,735 1,565 1,549 

Packages Rejected 91,267 71,860 74,653 

Packages Inspected 6,992,884 6,958,702 6,492,164 

Retail Stores : 

Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Rejection Tags 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 



-29- 



2,142 


2,140 


2,141 


1,356 


1,594 


1,687 


153 


251 


225 


2,537 


5,159 


1,404 


80,972 


101,111 


194,941 



STANDARDIZATION - continued 



Farmers ' Market 


1963-64 


1964-65 


1965-66 


Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Rejection Tags 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 


45 

12,700 

74 

1,157 

195,846 


45 
12,800 

17 

471 

176,611 


45 

12,850 

40 

1,829 

160,901 


Total Man Hours for all 
Produce Inspection 


5,551.5 


5,505 


5,699 


Wholesale Esre:s: 








Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Dozens Rejected 
Dozens Inspected 


20 

546 

158,965 

776,247 


20 

680 

178,789 

1,048,656 


20 

617 

205,078 

1,011,084 


Retail Er^s 








Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Dozens Rejected 
Dozens Inspected 


2,130 

1,324 

30,643 

243,498 


2,131 
1,896 

75,514 
450,906 


2,132 

1,972 

135,066 

664,659 



Total Man Hours for whse. 
& Retail Egg Inspection 



2,819 



; ,955 



3,712 



Poultry Meat 



Number of Premises 


928 


929 


930 


Premises Inspected 


1,080 


1,270 


1,289 


Packages Rejected 


21,000 


2,262 


8,841 


Packages Inspected 


63,772 


79,199 


120,140 


Total Man Hours 


359 


384 


450.5 


Honey 








Number of Premises 


2,142 


2,145 


2,147 


Premises Inspected 


1,311 


1,729 


1,542 


Packages Rejected 


5,159 


229 


715 


Packages Inspected 


98,814 


140,793 


123,224 


Total Man Hours 


387 


430 


365. 5 



TOTAL MAN HOURS FOR ALL 
STANDARDIZATION 



9,116.5 



10,274 



10,227 



-30- 



LURSERY INSPECTION 



All nurseries within the county are inspected at periodic intervals for 
the presence of pests, and for compliance with Grades and Standards. If seri- 
ous pests are found, eradication measures must be taken immediately by the 
nursery. All plants must be correctly labeled as to name* 

1965-64 1964-65 1965-66 

Number of Nurseries 184 182 184 
Premises Inspected 172 221 215 

Total Man Hours 410. 5 498 425 



SEED INSPECTION 

This involves the inspection and sampling of agricultural and vegetable 

seed lots at wholesale and retail locations for proper labeling as to germina- 
tion and weed seeds. 

1965-64 1964-65 1965-66 

Number of Premises 150 145 145 

Premises Inspected 89 78 90 

Total Man Hours 178.5 135 152.5 



EXPORT CERTIFICATION 

This is the inspection of fruits and vegetables going to foreign coun- 
tries in order to determine the compliance with the plant quarantine and 
standardization requirements of those countries. A fee is charged for this 
work. 

1965-64 1964-65 1965-66 

Certificates Issued 956 1,495 1,941 

Packages Inspected 118,516 177,920 252,507 



DISPOSAL ORDERS ISSUED aT WHOLESALE PRODUCE TERMINAL 

Disposal orders are issued for produce that has been rejected, or has 
been on hand too long. It is not salvageable. 

1965-64 1964-65 1965-66 

Disposal Orders Issued 1,602 1,657 1,741 
Number of Packages 51,365 41,294 97,794 



-51- 



PEST SURVEYS AKD PEST CONTROLS 



Detection surveys are important for determining the possible presence 
of new and dangerous agricultural pests. If pests can be discovered before 
they become too widely distributed, then there is a greater possibility of 
eradication. 

Pest control operators are licensed by the State Department of Agricul- 
ture. They must register with the Commissioner of the county in which the work 
is to be done. 

State regulations specify conditions of workmanship, and the precautions 
in application under direction of the Agricultural Commissioner. 



1963-64 



1964-65 1965-66 



Number of Fruit Ply Traps 
Number of Japanese Beetle Traps 

Permits Issued to Pest Control 
Operators 

Permits Issued for Use of Injuri- 
ous Herbicides 

Permits Issued for Use of Injuri- 
ous Materials 

Total Man Hours 



52 


50 


30 


20 


20 


16 


12 


14 


15 


15 


18 


16 


8 


9 


5 


240 


217 


204 



RELATED FUNCTIONS 



This includes the other varied activities such as giving garden advice 
to home owners, the gathering of crop statistics, certifying official fumiga- 
tion chambers, and performing general public relations work. 



-32- 



SAK FRANCISCO FARMERS' MARKET 



The San Francisco Farmers' Market opened on August 12, 1943 during the 
wartime as an outlet for surplus and distressed crops from neighboring counties. 
Its first location was at Market Street and Duboce Avenue, and was operated by 
the farmers themselves. The City and County assumed management on August 1st, 
1944. The Farmers' Market opened at its present location, 100 Alemany Boule- 
vard on August 4» 1947 > under a City Ordinance which authorizes the Chief 
Administrative Officer to establish a Farmers' Market to be administered by him 
or by aiiy department under his jurisdiction. It is now under the supervision 
of the Agricultural Commissioner who reports to the Chief Administrative Officer 
through the Director of Finance and Records. 

The Farmers' Market Ordinance requires that fees charged shall be suffi- 
cient to pay the operating and maintenance costs of the Market, and, in addition, 
to repay the City and County within a reasonable period, any capital improvements 
at the Market. During the 1965-66 fiscal year, 40 feet of roof was added to 
the south row of stalls at the east end of the Market. This capital improve- 
ment provided the Market with much needed additional covered stall space at a 
cost of 110,266.33. As of June 30, 1966, $304>797.50 has been repaid to the 
City. This is $46,120.45 in excess of the cost of the land and capital improve- 
ments at the Farmers' Market, which amounted to $258,677.05. 

The decrease in gross revenue for the year is the result of less tonnage 
being brought into the Market and fewer stalls being rented. This condition 
is the result of: 

1. The rain and cold weather in the winter and 
spring of 1965-66 causing severe loss in 
agricultural products. 

2. Less acreage under cultivation because small 
farmers are selling their farm land for 
subdividing. 

3. The Market operating on a 5-day week, Tuesday 
through Saturday since 1962-63, and on a six 
day week, Monday through Saturday, in years 
previous to 1962-63. 

Promotion Planned : 

It is contemplated that increased sales can be promoted through more news 
releases to newspapers, radio' and television stations, and other outlets. We 
will also mail Growers Certificates and new information about the Market to all 
growers who have used the Market in recent years. Informational letters 
concerning the Market will be sent to all County Agricultural Commissioners. 

The Market operates en a five day week, Tuesday through Saturday, from 
7 A. M. to 6 P. M. 



-33- 



The Market celebrated its Twenty-second Anniversary from August 9th to 
14th, 1965. This period was proclaimed "Farmers' Market Twenty-second Anni- 
versary Week" by hayor John F. Shelley, 



COMPARISON SUMMARY ; 

The following tabulation is a summary of Farmers' Market revenues, operating 
expenses, capital costs, and stall and tonnage fees from 1946 through June 30, 
1966: 



Fiscal 




Operating 


Excess of 


Stalls 




Year 


revenues 


Expenses 


Revenue 


Rented 


Tonnage 


1946-47 


$ 16,006,50 


$ 4,101.48 


3 11,905.02 


_ 


* 


1947-48 


19,748.00 


14,747.81 


5,020.19 


15,428 


6,085 


1948-49 


26,287.50 


15,285.47 


11,002.03 


17,267 


10,668 


1949-50 


32,190.50 


12,458.77 


19,731.73 


20,895 


11,695 


1950-51 


20,601.50 


21,231.69 


-(630.19) 


13,556 


7,337** 


1951-52 


29,363.50 


21,651.73 


7,711.77 


14,431 


8,156 


1952-55 


53,403.25 


18,374.48 


15,028,77 


18,726 


8,813 


1955-54 


37,423.50 


18,670.37 


18,753.13 


20,662 


9,497 


1954-55 


37,916.25 


18,661.35 


19,254.90 


21,495 


9,481 


1955-56 


35,142.00 


17,675.67 


17,466.33 


20,755 


7,927 


1956-57 


34,812,06 


18,454.77 


16,357.29 


20,584 


8,019 


1957-58 


34,844.00 


19,148.69 


15,695.31 


20,659 


7,694 


1958-59 


40,934.00 


22,475.18 


18,458.82 


22,712 


6,885 


1959-60 


46,850.75 


19,583.62 


27,267.13 


22,128 


6,806 


1960-61 


47,159.50 


20,708.90 


26,450.60 


22,461 


6,651 


1961-62 


41,769.75 


25,129.64 


16,640.11 


21,012 


5,675 


1962-65 


38,763.75 


20,252.25 


18,531.50 


18,683 


5,244 


1963-64 


37,541.00 


21,863.44 


15,677.56 


18,367 


4,897 


1964-65 


36,058.00 


23,156.33 


12,901.67 


17,898 


4,396 


1965-66 


35,892.00 


24,318.17 


11,573.83 


17,847 


4,085 




$682,707.31 


3377,909.81 


3304,797.50 


365,566 


140,041 



* Records are incomplete for fiscal year. 



■** Market was closed from February to July due to 
construction of new stalls. 



-3<f- 



The breakdown below summarizes the Farmers' Market Capital Exp nditures 
Program as of June 30, 1966. The City and County of San Francieco has been 
reimbursed for capital expenditures through the excess revenue each year. 

Capital Expenditures ; (Adjusted to agree with Controller's figures 1963-64) 

Land $ 53,052.15 

Improvements 205.644.90 

Total § 250,677.05 

Revenue and Operating Expenses ; 

Revenues 682,707.31 

Less Operating Expenses . . . 577.909.81 

304.797.50 

Excess of Net Revenue Over 

Capital Expenditures .... $ 46,120,45 



RSCOMKEIIDATIOHS FOR THE FARMERS' MARKETS 



The following project is necessary for the maintenance of the Farmers' 
Market Administration Building': 

The inside of the administration building needs painting to 
maintain the appearance of the office, conference room, supply 
room and rest rooms. Painting will also prevent deterioration 
of the walls and woodwork. 



-35- 



REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 
1965-66 

By authority of Charter Section 173 and the State Elections Code, the 
Registrar of Voters is responsible for the conduct, management and control 
of the registration of voters, and of the holding of elections and of all 
other matters pertaining to elections in the City and County. The small 
permanent staff has remained constant for many years. This force is augmented 
by seasonal workers, as required, during the registration and election periods. 
On Election Day, about 4500 precinct officials are employed. 

During fiscal year 1965-66 the Registrar conducted the November I965 
Municipal Election and the June 1966 Primary Election. Registration and 
voter participation at these elections were normal and there were no unusual 
problems. The 1966 Primary results give every indication that the 1966 
General Election will be an all-out battle for control of the State offices. 
This is already being felt in the extensive registration campaigns being 
waged by all interested parties. In February 1966 the Registrar conducted 
a Retirement Board Election and in May 1966, a Health Service Board Election. 

Election Problems 

The problem of the overly long ballot is still a complicating factor 
in elections. These very long ballots complicate our work and delay the 
count. They also make it virtually impossible for the voter to give proper 
study to the measures submitted for his decision. Considerable press comment 
has dealt with this phase of election procedure, but no acceptable solution 
to the problem has been found. Legislation has been introduced in State 
Legislature that would require separate elections for the partisan offices 
and nonpartisan offices and measures. This legislation did not pass, the 
main objection being the great added cost of conducting an additional election. 
Legislation was also introduced to restrict the submission of local measures 
at a statewide election. This also failed of passage. 

Re-apportionment of the Assembly has resulted in San Francisco losing 
one seat in the Assembly, but re-apportionment of the Senate gave us a new 
Senator to be elected in November 1966. Since Congressional Districts were 
not changed, a problem was created in that Assembly and Congressional Dis- 
tricts over-lap, which requires ballot changes and has increased our 
costs both in printing and administration. It is probable that Congressional 
Districts will be realigned in 1967 and the Re b istrar is concerned that the 
new lines may further aggravate this situation. It is hoped that the 
Legislature can be persuaded to make our two Congressional Districts conform 
to the new Assembly District lines. 

Registration of Voters 

For several years now State law has required the Registrar to deputize 
volunteer workers to take voters' registration. These workers are mostly 
partisan people or others who have a particular interest in the election. 
This program increases certain costs and any possible savings that might 
accrue by reason of some work being done by unpaid personnel, is offset by 
costs of instructing and checking the work of these deputies. Added problems 



-36- 



arise since we cannot closely supervise and direct these people who are 
authorized to work when and where they deem it desirable. However, the Legis- 
lature has repeatedly shown its intent to further expand such registration 
activities. At the 1963 session, State legislation was enacted whereby a 
voter may transfer his registration through a Post Office change of address 
card. This procedure was tried in some counties, but was abandoned when it 
was found to be unworkable. At the 19&5 session, legislation was introduced 
to extend the registration period to include up to 30 days before election. 
The bill was amended to close registration 45 days before election and was 
passed by the Assembly. It failed to pass in the Senate, but it is certain 
to be pursued in 1967. While an extended period of registration may be 
desirable, the Registrar believes this can be accomplished only by eliminating 
certain other desirable features and conveniences to the voter. 

Population Changes 

San Francisco's population appears static but great mobility of 
residents exists. In the past decade, the number of registered voters has 
declined due to decreasing population and the greater decrease in the city's 
adult population. This population decrease has not reduced the work load 
because the population has been more transitory and mobile due to large 
scale demolitions and reconstruction in connection with wartime housing 
projects and the Redevelopment programs. These dislocations do not increase 
our total registration, but do require new registrations and cancellation 
of old registrations. Much of this activity is now being stabilized and it 
is believed that as certain areas are occupied, the new registrants will be 
likely to remain at these locations. 

New Voting and Counting Procedures 

The State Legislature and the County Clerks and Registrars have been 
greatly concerned with the need to speed up election returns and to modernize 
election procedures. San Francisco has used voting machines for kO years 
and has always maintained a leading position in the conduct of elections. 
In the past few years, several of the major counties have explored the use 
of mechanized or electronic equipment to record, or to count the votes cast. 
Improved voting machines are now being offered, or are being developed. 
Some of the concepts being considered are not machines at all, but devices 
whereby the voter's choice is punched onto cards to be counted by data 
processing equipment. Actual ballot counting by electronic scanning has 
been tested in several counties. Results have been mixed. Legislation was 
introduced to make such methods illegal but failed of passage at the 1965 
session of the State Legislature. 

Some counties have gone into electronic data processing for maintenance 
of their files and compilation of voters list and election tallies. Some 
difficulty has been encountered but it is believed that these developments 
will result in eventual improvements in these operations. It appears probable 
that the Registrar's records can be converted to this program within the 
next few years. However, the basic problem still appears to be the very 
complex ballot and the very liberal election laws. The State Legislature 
is reluctant to restrict voters in any way but appears equally reluctant 
to simplify the ballot. Much of the problem has been built-in over a long 



-37- 



period of time in the State Constitution and the San Francisco Charter, neither 
of which can be amended without a vote of the electorate. Only by complete 
revision could these unwieldy documents be made more adaptable to changing 
conditions which now require constant amending. Much more study and effort 
will be required before this state's election procedures can be really 
modernized. 

Registrar of Voters Staff 

Staffing problems continue to be an area of concern to the Registrar. 
These problems are particularly acute in the clerical group where most of 
the positions are at the entrance level. As positions were vacated, they 
were reclassified pursuant to the Civil Service survey made several years 
ago. These new classifications did not appear to be significant, but in 
actuality they constitute a downgrading of the positions. In the past 5 years, 
9 of the 17 positions were downgraded. In the same period there was a turn- 
over of personnel in 14 of the 17 positions. In some cases the turnover has 
been multiple. In one position there have been 4 different people; in 
another, 3 different people, with probability of further change in the near 
future. Since the office employs up to 100 seasonal clerks, it is vital 
that there be some degree of permanency and experience in the regular staff. 
This appears impossible to achieve unless these positions are so classified 
that competent people can be obtained and, more important, retained. 

5-Year Workload Comparison 

1961.62 1962-63 1963-64 1964-65 1965-66 

Regular elections (number) 2 1 2 1 2 

Registration affidavits 

processed 49,578 79,301 8l,394 64,638 54,333 

Registration affidavits 

cancelled 34,662 120,219 41,382 82,908 38,390 

Sample ballots mailed 728,427 384,470 785,323 389,900 701,497 

Absentee ballots requested 



(paper) 


5,814 


7,745 


8,224 


14,198 


7,615 


Absentee vote (paper) 


4,810 


6,708 


7,160 


12,602 


6,794 


Absentee vote (machine ) 


5,106 


4,037 


7,451 


5,287 


5,780 


Precints used 


2,608 


1,332 


3,140 


1,341 


2,686 


Voting machines used 


3,274 


l,64o 


3,761 


1,670 


3,275 



Voting machines loaned/ 

leased 260 327 233 274 313 

Precinct vote (machines) 449,820 285,054 527,320 313,723 425,249 

Total votes case 459,736 295,799 541,931 331,612 if 38, 656 

Employee group elections 

(ballots) 13,592 13,651 12,195 12,629 26,157 



PU3LIC ADMINISTRATOR - PUBLIC GUAR^IaN (1965-66) 

This past year found a marked change for the better in that physical 
consolidation of the Public Administrator — Public Guardian offices was effected 
in December 1965. The consolidation together with additional staff has lessened, 
for the present, many of the problems shown in prior annual reports. 

Public Administrator 

The Public Administrator is an officer of the County Government as 
described in Section 2h000 of the Government Code and as provided for in the 
Charter of the City and County of San Francisco. The purpose of the office is 
to provide for the protection of the property of deceased persons and for the 
protection of the interests of heirs and creditors in such property. 

The duties of the Public Administrator as both a conservator and an 
administrator of the estates of deceased persons is set forth in Section llltO of 
the Probate Jode, as follows: "The Public Administrator of each county must 
take immediate charge of the property within his county of persons wno have died 
when no executor or administrator has been appointed and in consequence thereof 
the property, or any part thereof, is being wasted, uncared for or lost; and of 
all estates ordered into his hands by the Court. He shall apply for letters of 
administration upon estates of decedents who have no known heirs when the 
Superior Court of his county has jurisdiction thereof, and may apply for such 
letters upon any other estate upon which he is entitled to administer." 

All functions pertaining to each estate are handled by the office staff. 
These functions include - the investigation, making funeral arrangements, 
applications for letters, collection of all assets, payment of all legal debts, 
sales of real and personal property, filing and defending suits, obtaining all 
county, state, and Federal tax clearances, and distribution to heirs and the 
State of California. A complete and thorough investigation must be made of each 
estate reported - without a proper investigation there could be a loss of 
revenue to the county as well as a loss to the creditors and heirs. 

Investigation of Cases 



Approximately U5 per cent of the cases investigated are administered by 
)lic Administrator's Office. The remaining 55 per cent either have no 

or are turned over 1 
ty to serve . The abc 

5 Year workload Comparison 



the Public auwulls urn-box-- s uiii.ce. ine remaining ;>;> per cent, eitner nave no 
assets or are turned over to the named executor or administrator who may have a 
priority to serve. The above is one of the service functions of this office. 



Estates Investigated 
New Estates Opened 
Final Accounts Filed 
Discharges Filed 
Open Estates (end of year) 
Revenue from Fees 
Operating Expenses 
Net Revenue 



1962-63 


1963 -6k 


196^-65 


1965-66 


1966-67 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Estimated 


1,332 


1,297 


1,359 


1,362 


1,U00 


U87 


5U9 


505 


609 


SSo 


357 


3U3 


253 


190 


350 


U22 


305 


313 


309 


lr5o 


963 


1,207 


1,399 


1,699 


1,700 


§230,508 
|1U7,190 


£215,611 


*193,4h2 


$193,000 


^200,000 


3lU9,l60 


*15U,996 


$166,000 


Sl83,000 


$ 83,u67 


$ 66,510 


$ 38, 4 U6 


$ 27,000 


9 17,000- 



-39- 



The Public Administrator's Office is entirely self-supporting and as a 
matter of fact produces a profit for the City and County of San Francisco out 
of the revenues received from the estates of decedents. These revenues pay not 
only for the services in the general estates, but also for the free services 
provided in investigating decedents' deaths where no estates are ever opened by 
the Public Administrator. 

Efficiency of Administration 

The fact that the Public Administrator does receive statutory fees in the 
general probates also imposes some obligation on him to the heirs and creditors 
to at least give them the same attention as would prrrate administrators. Heirs 
are frequently prepared to be critical of the Public Administrator's Office, 
especially in those cases in which they have been denied the right to probate 
the estate because of their non-residence. They feel that, if tney had been 
allowed to alminister t\~e estate, they could do a much more efficient job and a 
much speedier* job than the Public Administrator. As a matter of fact, the 
Public Administrator's Office would not bow to any other administrator whether 
a corporate institution, such as a bank, or a private individual, as to the 
efficiency and speed with which orobate matters are administered. 



The public, of course, is not aware of this and the constant problem of 
attempting to please the unreasonable as well as the reasonable segments of the 
public means that every step must be taken that will insure a more efficient use 
of the staff. Actually, most expenditures which could be made to increase 
efficiency would, in fact, not be additional expense, but rather an investment 
to return more income to the City. There is every indication that the number of 
cases and the amount of money to be returned in estates will, during the years, 
continue to increase. The sooner these cases can be processed to completion, 
the sooner the fees are returned to the City treasury. 

10 Year Comparison - Expenditures and Revenues 



Fiscal 


Budgeted 


Actual 




Estimated 


Actual 




Year 


Expenditures 


Expenditures 


Difference 


Revenue 


Revenue 


Difference 


1956-57 


$ 98,3 8U 


$ 95,970 


$ - 2,U1U 


$ 160,000 $ 208,765 


1 U8,765 


1957-58 


109,610 


106,009 


- 3,601 


180,000 


179,039 


961 


1958-59 


il5,U5u 


lilt, 215 


- 1,239 


180,000 


176,538 


- 3,U62 


1959-60 


118,185 


115,716 


- 2, u 69 


185,000 


205, 2u9 


20,2h9 


1960-61 


13u,651i 


129,71*2 


- U,912 


200,000 


203,570 


3,570 


1961-62 


1U7,520 


136,761 


- 8,759 


210,000 


181,652 


- 28,3U8 


1962-63 


150,721 


1U7,190 


- 3,531 


200,000 


230,508 


30,508 


1963-61; 


155,791 


1U9,160 


- 6,631 


207,000 


215,610 


8,610 


196U-65 


162,1441 


15U,996 


- 7,850 


200,000 


193, U*2 


- 6,558 


1965-66 


171, U78 


166,276 


- 5,202 


200,000 


192, 61*5 


- 7,355 


1966-67 


18U,609 






200,000 






Public Guardian 













The office of Public Guardian was created in San Francisco County on 
July 1, I960, under ai thority of Section 5175 <~>f the Welfare and Institutions 
Code of the State of California. On July 1, I960, the Public Administrator 
became ex officio Fublic Guardian. The purpose of the office is to provide a 
public officer to serve, /hen needed, as guardian of the person and/or estate of 



-kO- 



persons who are patients in county facilities or recipients of aid under the 
Welfare and Institutions Code . 

The Public Guardian, like any other guardian appointed by the Court, has 
the care and custody of the person of his ward and the management of his estate 
until legally discharged, or in the case of the guardianship of a minor, until 
the minor reaches the age of majority, or the ward marries at 18 or over. The 
guardian must pay the ward's just debts as far as the estate is able, if 
necessary, selling the ward's real property or borrowing on it. Ke must demand, 
sue for and collect all debts due the ward. He must appear for and rapresent 
the ward in all ac Dions or proceedings. He must manage the ward's estate 
frugally and without waste and apply the income as far as necessary to the 
convenience, suitable support, maintenance, and age of the ward. 

He must file an inventory of all the estate's assets, together with an 
appraisal of the assets, unless the estate consists of money only, or money and 
other personal property of a market value of less than ^50.00. He must file 
periodic accounts for approval by the Court. Upon the death of the ward, if no 
probate of the estate is necessary, the funeral and last illness expenses may 
be paid, and, after such payment of these expenses and of the fees of the Public 
Guardian, a balance of cash remains in the estate, this may be delivered to the 
heirs at law under Section 630 of the Probate Code or delivered to the Public 
Administrator for administration. 

The Public Guardian program has been in operation for six years. The 
program is beneficial both to the ward and to the county. In all cases, the 
appointment is for both the person and estate. The ward is benefited by the 
personal attention of this office. The county is benefited by the payments for 
hospitalization and for back obligations of the ward. Without the Public 
Guardian program these incompetent people would be unable to collect welfare 
assistance, Social Security, and other pensions or benefits to which they are 
entitled. 

Eases Crowded Hosoital Condition 

Where possible and when it appears to be in the best interest of the 
wards, they are moved from the county facilities to private rest homes. This 
provides additional beds at the San Francisco General Hospital for patients who 
are more in need of medical assistance. 

Workload Comparison 



Applications Investigated 
Total Wards as of June 30 
New Wards during Year 
Guardianships Terminated 
Expenditures 
Benefits to County 
Revenues from Fees 



1962-63 


1963-61; 


1961i-65 


1965-66 


1966-67 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Estimated 


209 


227 


529 


1,163 


1,000 


2514 


237 


213 


398 


700 


92 


37 


he 


2U7 


350 


1±8 


5U 


70 


61 


60 


$ 23,OUi 


$ 2U,li91 


$ 25,312 


$ 91,000 


S 100,000 


$603,21*0 


$U9U,985 


£537,387 


£761,000 


?i,UUo,ooo 


$ 5,066 


$ 5,621 


3 8,731 


$ 9,100 


$ 12,000 



-*n- 



Fees 

The 'welfare and Institutions Code provides that upon termination of the 
guardianship, either by death or restoration to competency, the Public Guardian 
may now be awarded fees by the judge of the Superior Court on the filing of the 
final account. The fees for the last fiscal year amounted to $9,100.00. 
These fees are in addition to other benefits, both direct and indirect, 
received through this program. 

Present and Anticipated Future Requirements 

As noted, even though the workload has increased, the present staff is 
able to handle the current workload. Due to the physical consolidation of the 
Public Administrator - Public Guardian office the loss of four requested 
positions did not handicap the operation of the office as much as was expected. 
The utilization of personnel formerly assigned only to the respective offices 
in either program has afforded more flexibility to meet fluctuation in the 
workload of each office. It should be noted that the caseload of the Public 
Administrator has increased over 20 per cent during the past year. 

This increase has not become a critical problem as yet because (l) of 
the utilization of the joint staffs, as noted above, and (2) fewer cases were 
closed during the year than ordinarily would have been closed. If the case- 
load continues to increase, more personnel will be required to administer 
estates within a reasonable period of time. 

In connection with the anticipated workload, two situations have 
recently presented themselves: (i) the burial of the indigent dead; and (2) 
the investigation and burial arrangements of competent persons who die outside 
of the county and who are recipients of welfare benefits. 

At present the San Francisco College of Mortuary Science has a contract 
with the City and County of San Francisco for the removal and burial of the 
indigent dead. Due to the increased number of welfare recipients dying 
outside the county the determination of indigency, especially at nights and on 
weekends, has become a serious problem. The jurisdiction of various County 
Departments (such as the Department of Public Health, the Coroner, and the 
Public Administrator) in determining the indigency of these decedents is in 
doubt. At joint meetings of representatives of these departments, it was 
concluded on a purely practical basis that the Public Administrator was in the 
best position to determine indigency and to complete the necessary arrange- 
ments when the death occurs during the night or weekend hours. At this time 
there is no way to make any reasonable calculation as to the effect on the 
Public Administrator workload in the near future. 

The other situation which will undoubtedly affect the workload is the 
increasing practice by the Department of Social Welfare and the County Hospi- 
tals of placing competent patients in nursing and convalescent homes in other 
counties (Alameda, Contra Costa, Napa, Solano, San Mateo, Marin, Sonoma). 
Since these persons are involuntarily removed they are residents of San 
Franoisco and the other counties wi";i not assazu?. liability for their burial. 



-42- 



At the joint meetings referred to above, a practical wording arrange- 
ment has been initiated whereby the other affected departments are supposed 
to supply the Public Administrator's office with detailed information as to 
these placements and the history aid assets of the patients. 

Recently the State Department of Llental Hygiene has started to release 
patients from State institutions to boarding and nursing homes in the 
surrounding counties. All persons committed from San Francisco revert back 
to this jurisdiction. 

It is felt certain that, with the cooperation of all City and County 
Departments which could be involved in helping to work out the best solution, 
the additional workload and problems of the Public Administrator - Public 
Guardian can be met effectively. 



-<+3- 



TAX COLLECTOR 

1965-66 

The Tax Collector operates under several sets of laws, either 
State or Local, as the basic nature of the task to be done dictates. 
As a County Officer he must observe the directives of the State Revenue 
and Taxation Code in: (a) collecting current and delinquent real and 
personal property taxes, (b) preparing and publishing by June 8 of each 
year a list of delinquent real estate tax payers, (c) making required 
periodic reports to the State Controller and to the local auditor, 
(d) executing deeds to the State of California on properties delinquent 
for five or more years, (e) making provisions to hold public auctions 
of tax-deeded properties and the actual auctions themselves, and 
(f) making refunds on duplicate or erroneous payments. 

As a City Officer he proceeds under the Charter and Ordinances 
of the City and County in: (a) collecting licenses, (b) operating the 
Bureau of Delinquent Revenue, (c) collecting larking Meter receipts, 
(d) collecting the Hotel Room Tax, and (e) making the reports and 
settlements required of a local official who collects monies. 

During 1965-66, there was again an appreciable increase in the 
work load of the Tax Collector's Office. The increased activity 
occurred in all eight of the Divisions that comprise the Tax Office. 
These are: Cashier's Division, Seal Estate Tax Division, Parking Meter 
Division, Bureau of Delinquent Revenue, Bureau of Licenses, Legal 
Bureau, Hotel Tax Bureau, and Investigators Division. In the future, 
all unsecured personal property taxes are to be collected by the Tax 
Collector, beginning at the March lien date. 

Cashier's Division 

During the last fiscal year, the Cashier's Division of Tax 
Collector's Office collected $186,692,009.82, an all-time high for 
the twelfth consecutive year. 

Peak periods for tax collection were from July 15 to September 15 
for unsecured personal property taxes, and from November 1 to December 15 
and March 1 to April 15 for real property taxes. Peak periods for 
license collections were in January, July, and October. 

Following is a table of collections for the various divisions for 
1965-66, as compared with 1964-65. 

1964-65 1965-66 

Real Froperty Taxes and Secured 

Personal Property Taxes .... i>121 ,144,935- 86 ^137,259,862.65 

Unsecured I ersonal Property Taxes 22 ,386 ,267-54 24,329,709-96 

Purchase and Use Tax ...... 18,924,343-27 19,467,321.27 

Parking Meters . 1,550,903-12 1,569,203-54 

Delinquent Revenue 1,329,083-68 1,471,471.24 

Licenses 2,327,106.46 2,492,137-71 

Miscellaneous 99,295-24 102,303-45 

TOTAL 1,167,761,935.17 ^186,692,009.82 

-44- 



The .v 17 1 000 ,000 increase in real property taxes is partially 
due to some increased assessments, but mostly because of the tax rate 
rise from v9.23 to 810.168. 

Peal Estate Tax Division 

Reconversion to an Electronic Data Processing program has been 
somewhat delayed, due to other E. D. F. schedulings. The July Real 
Estate Rolls, the hailing Lists, and the November bills are- all being 
electronically produced. Programming by the E. D. P. staff is pro- 
ceeding, with the ultimate objective of having all tax collection 
procedures and accounts done electronically. Rapidity of accomplish- 
ment is, of course, contingent upon the amount of attention that can 
be given by the E. D. P. staff to Tax Office matters. 

Due to our implied legal obligation to mail tax bills to an 
address that has been given to the County Recorder, it is imperative 
that E. D. F. help us keep current on now deed recordings. 

Real estate tax delinquencies in oan Francisco are ctill the 
lowest among all major counties in the State. 

The following table shows delinquencies for 1965-66, compared 
with 196^-65. 

Real Property Unsecured Property 
Taxes Taxes 

Amount Delinquent June 30, 1966 $2,057,998.95 $891,519-33 

Amount Delinquent June 30, I965 1,510,722.89 638,899.22 

Per Cent Delinquent June 30, 1966 1.48 3.45 

Per Cent Delinquent June 30, 1965 1.234 2.66 

There were 3,905 parcels sold to the State and 10 deeded to the 
State in 1965-66, compared to 3,173 parcels sold to the State and 20 
deeded to the State in the previous fiscal year. 

Purchase and Use Tax 

San Francisco's Purchase and Use Tax has been collected since 
July 1, 1958, by the State of California as agent for the City and 
County, and the revenues minus collection costs are returned to the 
City and County. 

The figures for this, and last year, are shown previously in 
this report. 

Parking Meter Division 

The Parking Meter Division collects, sorts and counts, and 
prepares for deposit all coin deposited in 12,795 parking meters in 
San Francisco. Thirteen collectors are used in the operation, eight 
men in three panel trucks collecting the money and winding the springs 
of about 4,250 meters daily, while five men in the office process 



-45- 



the coins. Of the 53,680,225 coins handled during the- fiscal year 
1965-66, 36,302,978, or 67 3/4$, were pennies; 10,652,201, or 
19 3/4#, were nickels, and 6,725,046, or 12 1/2%, were dimes. The 
total weight of the coins processed during the year was 404,044 
pounds, an increase over the previous fiscal year of 1,944 pounds. 

This increase in weight is also marked by a new record in revenue, 
The yearly tot^l of il, 569, 203. 54 is an all time high, representing an 
increase over 1964-65 of £18,300.42. 

Also affecting the operation was the further implementation of 
the Parking Authority Off-Street Parking program, which began metered 
operations in August 1964 with one lot at l8th and Castro Streets. 

Six more lots were started in the fiscal year 196*1-65, another 
four were added in 1965-66. These latter four are located at Ocean 
Avenue and Junipero Serra, Ocean Avenue and 19th Avenue, Clement and 
9th Avenue, and Clement and 8th Avenue. 

This brings of f-street parking lots to a total of eleven, with 
two more expected to be in operation soon. 

The over-all program envisions possibly twenty-six. 

A comparison of yearly parking meter revenue follows: 

1958-59 31,130,967 1962-63 £1,491,368 

1959-60 1,401,912 1963-6'+ 1,467,727 

1960-61 1,500,003 1964-65 1,550,903 

1961-62 1,459,558 1965-66 1,569,204 

During the year Canadian and foreign coins were redeemed for 
CI, 068. 13. An average of more than three pounds daily of washers and 
slugs, or more than 700 pounds during the year was separated from the 
negotiable coins and disposed of in the bay. 

Bureau of Delinquent Revenue 

A total of 4,208 accounts, other than personal property 
billings, was transferred to the Bureau of Delinquent Revenue by 
various City and County departments during 1965-66. 

The number of accounts handled represents a continuous 
increase over those of previous fiscal years. This was accomplished 
with no increase in the number of personnel and without a full crew 
of investigators in the field for the entire year. 

As part of the Assessment reform program instituted by Assessor 
Joseph E. Tinney, all collections of personal property payments in 
the future will be made by the Tax Collector, which will approximately 
triple the number of personal property items. 

Instead of 40,000 unsecured personal property bills, the Tax 



-46- 



Collector will receive and account for 125,000 such items. 

Cost to the City and County for monies collected by the Bureau 
of Delinquent Revenue was approximately 8.05% during the same fiscal 
year. 

Following is a summary of activities of the Bureau for 1965-66 
showing also a comparison with 1964-65. 



No. Unsec. Irop. Tax Bills 
Collections, Unsec. Del. Frop. 
Taxes 

No. Fub. Health Dept. Del. Accts. 
Collections, Fub. Health Dept. 

No. Fub. Library Del. Accts. 
Collections, Fublic Library 

No. Sonoma Home Accts. 
Collections, Sonoma Home 

No. Other City & Co. Dept. 
Del. Accts. 

Collections, Other Depts. 

No. Interest, Fees, Court 

Costs Accts. 
Collections, Int., Fees, 
Court Costs 

Total No. Accounts Received 
Total Collections, Delinquent 
Accounts 

As part of collection enforcement procedures, 2,468 court 
actions were instituted in 1965-66. Of this total, 2,359 were filed 
in Small Claims Court, 105 in the Municipal Court, and 4 in the 
Superior Court. 

Bureau of Licenses 

For the fiscal year 1965-66 the Bureau of Licenses showed 
an increase in gross receipts. As an efficiency move, we have 
endeavored to place licenses on an annual , rather than a quarterly 
basis, wherever possible. Following is a breakdown of licenses by 
type, number, and amount for 1965-66 compared to 1964-65. 





1964-65 




1965-66 




40,176 




45,116 


z 


864,163.17 


»'■ 


978,505.23 


If 


1,245 
316,667.43 


M 


1,102 
348,371.37 


z 


1,286 
7,410.61 


- 


2,189 
7,369.98 


z 


34 
79,726.52 


8 


40 
81,090.78 




700 




630 


z 


66,486.13 


Z 


62,593.38 




289 




247 


.3 


1,920.55 




1,080.37 




43,730 




49,324 


$ 


1,336,374.41 


31 


,479,011.11 



-47- 



1964 1965 1965 - 1966 

Number Amount Number Amount 

General Business 31,183 8 643,747.05 29,351 3 639,597-91 

Vehicles .... 367 38,379.50 385 38,899.20 

Bicycles .... 4,063 2,031.50 3,566 1,783.00 

Inspection Fees 2,461 79,743.10 2,410 78,156.35 

Contractors. . . 2,292 23,109.00 2,l84 22,082.00 

Miscellaneous. . 3,5^1 7,831.85 3,868 8,380.10 

Dog 30,484 91,452.00 30,801 123,204.00 

Duplicate Dog Tags 491 245.50 397 198.50 

Curb Fainting . 19 2,346.90 18 2,230.50 

Meat 602 15,999-25 624 15,539.30 

Total (Excluding 

Hotel Room Tax) 75,503 S 904,885.65 73,604 £ 930,070.86 

Hotel Room Tax 1,542 1,444,751.29 1,488 1,639,533-54 

Grand Total 

License Bureau 77,045 Z2, 349, 636. 94 75,092 ,'2,569,604.40 

Effective next year, the supervisors have ordered small raises in 
the licenses applicable to hotels, apartment houses, laundries, and 
off-sale food. Dos; licenses were raised this year from '3.00 to ,4.00. 

Hotel Room Tax Sub-Bureau 

Although a separate Budget item, the Hotel Room Tax as shown 
above is collected by the Bureau of Licenses. 

Established by Ordinance July 1, 196l, the Hotel Accounts set up 
by the License Bureau amounted to 1488 in 1965-66. This represents 
approximately 450 active tax-paying hotels. 

Each quarterly amount represents the tax collected by the hotels 
between the dates specified. 

A comparison of collections by quarters fellows: 

1964. - 1965 1965 - 1966 

July 1 - September 30 $ 436,698.12 .. 497,882.44 

October 1 - December 31 334,392.50 364,296.13 

January 1 - March 31 320,140.80 340,970.97 

April 1 - June 30 353,519.87 436,384.00 

TOTAL i 1,444.751.29 8 1,639,533.54 



-48- 



1966-67 

Annual Report 

/// 

DIRECTOR OF 

FINANCE AND RECORDS 

// 




DOCUMENTS 
OCT 6 1967 

ABLifffiSBSgr 



INCLUDING 



County Clerk Recorder Records Center 

Registrar of Voters Tax Collector 

Records Preservation Officer 



Public Guardian 



Public Administrator 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Agricultural Commissioner Farmers' Market 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Director of Finance and Records 

September 1, 1967 

Subject: 1966-67 Annual 
Report 

Honorable Thomas J. Mellon 
Chief Administrative Officer 
City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Mr. Mellon: 

Herewith is respectfully submitted the annual report 
for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1967, covering the City 
and County departments and offices under the jurisdiction 
of the Director of Finance and Records. 

Subject to your approval, we administer the services 
and activities of the Departments of Finance and Records, 
Weights and Measures, and Agriculture, which include the 
offices of County Clerk, Recorder, Registrar of Voters, 
Public Administrator, Public Guardian, Tax Collector, 
Records Center, Records Preservation Officer, Sealer of 
Weights and Measures, Farmers' Market and Agricultural 
Commissioner. 

Separate reports for each of these offices are included 
herein, together with the statistical data requested by the 
Mayor, Each separate report was prepared by the office 
head concerned. 

Offices which more than pay their own way through fees 
collected for services provided, are the Recorder, Public 
Administrator, .and Farmers' .Market. The Public Guardian like- 
wise more than pays its own way, the benefits realized 
largely through hospital benefits paid in behalf of the 
wards . 

Very truly yours, 



VIRGIL L. ELLIOTT 
Director 



INDEX 

Letter of Transmittal ..... 1 

Index 2 

Organization Chart ... 3 

Records Preservation Officer ....... 4 

Records Center ...... 9 

County Clerk 12 

Recorder 19 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 22 

Agricultural Commissioner .26 

Farmers' Market 31 

Registrar of Voters 34 

Public Administrator-Public Guardian ... 36 

Tax Collector . . 41 



-2- 



ORGANIZATION CHART — DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND RECORDS 
City and County of San Francisco, California 



MAYOR AND BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 



LEGAL 



City & Plat Attys 



PROPERTY 



Real Estate Dept. 



FISCAL 



Controller, Tree. 



PERSONNEL 



Civil Service 



CHIEF 
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



Thomas J. Mellon 



EMPLOYEE WELFARE 



Ret. Sye., H.S.S. 



SUPPLY 



Purchasing Dept. 



DIRECTOR'S OFFICE 



2 employees 



DIRECTOR 

of 

FINANCE AND RECORDS 



Virgil L. Elliott 



REGISTRAR 
OF VOTERS 



Basil Healey 



Register San Francisco 
voters; conduct elec- 
tions, INCLUDING EM- 
PLOYEE elections; 

MAINTAIN VOTING MA - 
CH I NES . 



24 employees 



COUNTY CLERK, 
RECORDER 



Martin Mongan 



keep records of the 
Superior court; 
i ssue marr i age l i • 
censes ; provide 
courtroom clerks; 
recoro and index 
d ocume n ts . 



employees 



6-30-67 



AGRICULTURAL 
COMMISSIONER 



R. L. Bozzini 



I NSPECTS FRUITS, VE 
ETABLES , NUTS , POUL 
TR Y , EGGS , HONE Y , 
NURSERY, PEST CONTROL 

ft seed; inspect for 

PLANT OUARANTINE ANO 
EXPORT CERT I F I CATES . 



9 employees 



MAIN., REPAIR 



Pub. Works Dept. 



TAX 
COLLECTOR 



Vacancy 



COLLE CT AO VALOREM 
AND UNSECURED TAXES 
PARKING METER RE- 
CEIPTS; ISSUE BUS I - 
NESS LI CENSES . RE- 
CEIVE PURCHAS E ANO 
USE TAX RECEIPTS. 
COLLECT HOTEL TAX 



employees 



PUBLIC ADHIN., 
PUBLIC GUARDIAN 



Con S. Shea 



ADMI NISTER ESTATES; 
SERVES AS PUBLIC 

GUARD IAN. 



27 employees 



RECORDS 
CENTER 



Vacancy 



3 employees 



FARMERS' 
MARKET 


P 


. J.O'Connell 


3 employees 



SEALER OF 
WTS. & MEASURES 



O.C. Skinner. Jr 



Test weighing and 
measur i n g oev i ces: 
inspect packaged 
commod i t i es . 



9 employees 



RECORDS PRESERVATION OFFICER 



1966-67 



Ordinance No. 126-62 declares that the "public interest demands 
that various City and County records which would be essential to the 
continuity of government and the protection of rights and interest of 
individuals in event of a major disaster be preserved against possible 
destruction by fire, earthquake, flood, enemy attack or other cause." 

Incorporated into the Administrative Code as Sections 8.9 through 
8,11, this ordinance names the Chief Administrative Officer, or the 
head of any department under his jurisdiction as designated by him, 
to serve as Records Preservation Officer. The Chief Administrative 
Officer delegated this duty to the Director of Finance and Records. 

Under provisions of the ordinance, the Records Preservation 
Officer "shall recommend to the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors .a 
program for the selection and preservation of essential City and 
County records, shall advise and assist in its establishment and 
maintenance, and shall recommend the place and manner of safekeeping 
of essential records and preservation of duplicates." 

Annual Survey is Submitted 

The Records Preservation Officer is required to submit annually 
to the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors a report containing recom- 
mendations as to which City and County records should be designated 
as essential and preserved against a major disaster. In addition, 
he is required to report "on the status and progress of the records 
preservation program, together with recommendations for making such 
revisions as deemed necessary to keep the inventory of essential 
records current, accurate and complete." 

The latest such report submitted December 5, 1966, classified 
21,109,800 pages of City and County records as essential within the 
meaning of Ordinance 126-62. Of this total, 8,589,900 pages had been 
safeguarded by a preservation copy, either on microfilm, paper, by 
dispersal, or in a fireproof office vault. 

Official Microfilming Policy 

The Board of Supervisors, on June 20, 1966, approved a resolu- 
tion submitted by the Records Preservation Officer declaring it to be 
official City and County policy that agencies having large quantities 
Df old records which must be kept indefinitely, should have them 
tiicrofilmed, with one film copy to remain in the agency for daily 
reference and a second film copy to be placed in a separate place for 
safekeeping. 

Records that must be kept indefinitely should be microfilmed. 
The breakeven point is approximately 40 years. Any paper record that 
nust be kept for 40 years or more can be kept more economically (not 



-4- 



to mention more conveniently) in microfilm form. And duplicate pre- 
servation copies should be made of all essential records. 

As Records Preservation Officer, we recommend that all departments 
provide for protection of essential records in their custody through 
one of the following methods: 

Microfilm — The original document is microfilmed. A 
microfilm copy replaces the department's original copy 
for daily office references; a second microfilm copy 
is stored in the Records Center's Underground Vault as 
a security copy. Under these conditions, the original 
paper copy usually can be destroyed, when certain 
approvals have been obtained. 

Microfilm — Alternative microfilming method: The paper 
original remains in the department for office reference; 
the microfilm copy is stored in the Record Center's 
Underground Vault. This method is less costly, but it 
deprives the department of space that could be saved with 
having a microfilm copy for office reference, if space is 
a factor for consideration. 

Dispersal — A duplicate copy (carbon, mimeograph, photo- 
copy, microfilm, etc.) is stored at a remote location. 
The duplicate copy could then be returned to the depart- 
ment should the original be lost. 

Office Vault — If a fireproof office vault is available, 
this should provide reasonable security for essential 
records. Usually this method is used only where the 
volume of essential records is relatively small. 

Many records that do not come under the heading of "essential" 
should, nevertheless, be microfilmed especially where they must be 
kept indefinitely and where the quantity or volume is large. We 
were successful in obtaining 1967 State Legislation establishing 
"cutoff points" for Superior Court records, for example, so that 
the oldest paper files may he discarded. This will help to reduce 
microfilming costs. 

The Records Preservation Officer will assist in every way 
possible in the developing of records preservation program. Funds 
required for such activities may be requested by the various depart- 
ments, offices, boards and commissions through the usual budgetary 
channels. 

Our "Inventory of Records Designated as Essential" follows on 
the next page. 



-5- 



INVENTORY OF RECORDS DESIGNATED AS ESSENTIAL 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
(as of December 5, 1966) 



Department 

ADULT PROBA- 
TION 

AIRPORT 

ART COMM. 

ASSESSOR 

BOARD OF 
EDUCATION 

BOARD OF 
SUPERVISORS 



CHIEF ADMIN. 
OFFICER 



CITY ATTORNEY 
CITY PLANNING 
CIVIL SERVICE 
CONTROLLER 
COUNTY CLERK 



Essential 

Records 

(Type) 

Minutes 



Leases 

Minutes 

Assessment files 
Minutes, etc. 



Ordinances 

Resolutions 

Journals 



Safeguarded 
Essential by Pre- 
Records servation 
(Pages) copies (Pages) 

5,000 2,000 



4,000 

6,000 

900,000 
550,000 



12C,000 
200,000 



Pub. and Adv. 

contracts 1,000 

Rulings 35,000 

Minutes, Maps 30,000 

Minutes, personnel 200,000 

Fiscal, payroll 600,000 

Judgments 3,550,000 

Indexes 95,500 
Register of 

Actions 557,200 



1,000 

1,000 

10,000 

500,000 



115,000 
200,000 



Preservation 
Method in 
Use, or 
Recommended 

Office Vault 



Office Vault 
Office Vault 
Office Vault 
Microfilm 



Microfilm 

Office Vault 






Office Vault 





Dispersal 


25,000 


Office Vault 


10,000 


Office Vault 


100,000 


Microfilm 


265,000 




Microfilm 
Microfilm 





Microfilm 



Department 

leYOUNG MEMORIAL 
MUSEUM 

SLECTRICITY 

ERE DEPT. 

1EALTH SERVICE 
SYSTEM 

IOUSING APPEALS 

IOUSING AUTH. 

JUVENILE 
PROBATION 

REGION OF HONOR 

MUNICIPAL. COURT 



4UNICIPAL 
RAIL./AY 



D ARKING 
AUTHORITY 

5 0LIC£ DEPT. 

-UBLIC ADMIN. 

5 UBLIC HEALTH 



'UBLIC LIBRARY 
'UBLIC WORKS 



Essential 

Records 

(Type) 



Records 
(Pap.es) 



Minutes, inventory 80,000 
Cable naps 1,000 

Minutes, maps 15,400 

Membership records 60,000 
Minutes 3,000 

Minutes, leases 80,000 

Minutes 4,000 

Minutes, inventory 45,000 

Registers of 

actions 900,000 

Indexes, min. books 850,000 



Miscellaneous 
Records 



7,500 



Authority minutes 54,000 

Commission minutes 70,000 

Active case records 8,000 

Birth records 1,860,000 

Death records 1,6C0,000 
Other health 

records 100,000 

Disinterments 60,C00 

Commission minutes 3,200 

DPW minutes 280,000 
Engineering records 75,000 
Sewer main maps 1,000 
Other maps 1,000 



Safeguarded 


Preservation 


by Pre- 


Method 


in 


servation 


Use, or 


copies (Pa^es) 


Recommended 


3,000 


Office 


Vault 


1,000 


Microfilm 


15,400 


Office 


Vault 


10,000 


Office 


Vault 


1,000 


Office 


Vault 


5,000 


Office 


Vault 


1,000 


Office 


Vault 


5,000 


Office 


Vault 





Microfilm 










3,500 

5,000 

10,000 

8,000 

1,860,000 

1,600,000 

15,000 
60,000 



40,000 

500 
500 



Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Dispersal 
Dispersal 

Microfilm 
Microfilm 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 
Microfilm 
Microfilm 
Microfilm 



Department 



Essential 

Records 

(Type) 



Safeguarded Preservation 
Essential by Pre- Method in 
Records servation Use, or 

Recommended 



PUBLIC UTILITY 
COMM. 



Minutes 



45,000 



Office Vault 



PURCHASER 


Contracts 


3,000 





Office Vault 




Equipment inventory 


18,000 





Office Vault 


REAL ESTATE 


Property records 


60,000 


5,000 


Office Vault 


RECORDER 


Property records 


5,000,000 


2,650,000 


Microfilm 




Marriage licenses 


455,000 


455,000 


Dispersal 


RECREATION- 










PARK 


Commission minutes 


5,000 


3,000 


Office Vault 


REDEVELOPMENT 


Minutes, contracts 


10,000 


1,000 


Office Vault 


RETIREMENT 










SYSTEM 


Membership records 


95^,000 





Microfilm 


SHERIFF 


Inmate records 


9,000 


4,000 


Office Vault 


UTILITY ENGINEER 










BUREAU 


Engineering records 


550,000 


525,000 


Microfilm 


WAR MEMORIAL 


Minutes 


21,000 


2,000 


Office Vault 


WATER DEPT. 


Customer records 


100,000 


75,000 


Office Vault 


WELFARE 


Minutes 


18,000 


6,000 


Office Vault 



TOTALS 



21, 109, J 



8,589,900 



RECORDS CENTER 

1966-67 

The Records Center was established 16 years ago by ordinance of the 
Board of Supervisors. This ordinance, now comprising Chapter 8 of the 
San Francisco Administrative Code, authorizes the Chief Administrative 
Officer to establish, maintain and operate within a department under 
his jurisdiction a Records Center for the "orderly storage, care, 
management and safeguarding of storage records of the departments and 
offices of the City and County and of the San Francisco Unified School 
District." The Chief Administrative Officer has delegated to the 
Director of Finance and Records the authority to administer the opera- 
tions and personnel of the Records Center. Two Clerks and a Principal 
Clerk comprise the Center's staff. 

Under provisions of the Administrative Code, services of the 
Records Center are provided without charge, including storage boxes, 
transportation of boxes and reference services. Paper records are 
stored at 1H4 Townsend and 930 Bryant Streets, where the combined 
capacity is 33,600 cubic feet (storage boxes), and at the old Munici- 
pal Railway streetcar barn, Geary Boulevard and Masonic Avenue, where 
not more than 3,000 cubic feet can be stored. 

Microfilm records are stored in the underground vault beneath the 
Municipal Railway's Forest Hill Station, Most microfilm images are on 
100-foot, 16-mm. reels and placed in cartons 2" x 4" x 1" in size. 
These cartons are stored in fireproof metal safes which have combina- 
tion locks. Double fireproof doors protect against unauthorized entry 
to the vault room, wherein temperature and humidity controls have been 
provided. 

Costs of Microfilming Old Records 

The Board of Supervisors in 1966 adopted as policy our recommenda- 
tion that sizable quantities of records that must be kept indefinitely, 
should be microfilmed. This plan provides for one microfilm copy to 
be retained in the department for daily reference and a duplicate copy 
to be stored in the Record Center's underground vault as a preserva- 
tion copy in event the original film is lost or destroyed. 

This program, if supported with the necessary appropriation of 
funds to do the microfilming work, will relieve the overcrowding at the 
Records Center, where, for example, 40 per cent of the storage volume 
consists of Superior Court records in paper form that must be kept 
indefinitely. If microfilmed, a film copy would be available at all 
times in the County Clerk's office. Records on microfilm require onlj? 
one-sixtieth of the storage space required by those same records in 
paper form. A security copy also would be provided. 

The cost to produce a 16 mm microfilm image ranges from 1,1* to 
1.5C for letter size paper records and from l,6<t to 2$ for legal size 
documents . The cost varies somewhat depending on whether the work is 
done by city personnel or by an outside contractor. 

-9- 



Records that must be kept indefinitely should be microfilmed. The 
breakeven point is approximately 40 years. Any paper record that must 
be kept for 40 years or more can be kept more economically (not to 
mention more conveniently) in microfilm form. And duplicate preserva- 
tion copies should be made of all essential records. Duplicate 16 mm 
microfilm copies can be made for about 1/2$ per image. 

As a general rule, any City and County record may be microfilmed 
and the microfilm copy substituted for the original paper copy, pro- 
viding that one microfilm copy is made conveniently accessible to the 
public and a duplicate microfilm copy is stored in a safe and separate 
place for security purposes. There are numerous exceptions and varia- 
tions to this rule, however. 

It is advisable to consult the City Attorney before initiating 
any record microfilming project. 

Microfilming, where permitted, enables keeping in the department 
Dfficial copies of all of that department's old records, rather than 
having them stored at the Record Center or some other remote location. 
In addition to this convenience, there is a tremendous saving in 
space, the ratio being 60 to 1. 'The original expense is a major item 
of consideration, and must be borne by the department having custody 
af the record. 

Meed for Consolidating Records Center Locations 

It would be highly desirable to consolidate the paper records 
stored in the three present locations, which complicates our reference 
service — especially without a vehicle. 

The Records Center very sorely needs a vehicle for thrice-daily 
use in delivery and pickup of requested files to and from City Hall. 
In addition, the vehicle is needed for necessary trips to the three 
warehouses, the Hall of Justice, the Forest Hill station vault, and 
to pick up the occasional small loads of "new" records that various 
departments accumulate and usually wish to move quickly to the Records 
Center. 

The present practice is to engage movers, at expensive hourly 
rates, to move the "new" records. As for the thrice-daily delivery 
and pickup at City Hall, public transportation is used. This some- 
times requires a Records Center employee to carry, on a public bus, 
a heavily-laden briefcase, plus a 20-pound bound volume such as a 
Minute Book of the Superior Court — a heavy load to balance in a 
noving bus, and something of a menace to other passengers. (Employees' 
autos are not always available or suitable for such heavy use.) Thus, 
Lt is earnestly hoped that approval may be obtained as soon as possible 
:o acquire a vehicle for the Records Center. 

Records in storage totaled 37,755 cubic feet as of June 30, 1967 
[see next page). Capacity is 37,900 cubic feet. A breakdown of 
records in storage follows: 



-10- 



i\ll.ukl>C5 in iiui\ftt>rj -t\z>- ur juwl av , isui 



DEPARTMENT 



MICROFILM PAPER RECORDS 1966-67 
(100* Reels) Cubic Feet) References 



Adult Probation .„,.<,... 
Art 

Assessor , „ . . . . 38,5 

Board of Permit Appeals » * • . 

Board of Supervisors ..... 70.0 

Calif . Palace Legion of Honor . .3 
Chief Administrative Officer . 
City Attorney ........ 

City Planning ......... 39.5 

Civil Service . 7.8 

Controller * . . . . 17.6 

De Young Museum .8 

District Attorney . ♦ 

Electricity 3.3 

Fair Employment ........ 

Finance and Records: 
County Clerk (Superior Court) . 55.5 

Recorder . 3,348.0 

Registrar of Voters 

Public Administrator ..... 

Tax Collector 7.8 

Weights and Measures ..... 
Law Library .......... 6.0 

Mayor 

Municipal Court ........ 55.0 

Public Defender 

Public Health: 
Child Psychiatric Clinic . . . 
Crippled Children's Services . 

City Clinic 

Laguna Honda .... 

Other Health Services .... 15.0 
S.F. General Hospital .... 
Public Utilities: 

Airport 1.5 

Bur. of Light, Heat and Power . 2.5 

General Office P.U.C 

Hetch Hetchy 15.0 

Municipal Railway ...... 3.5 

Utilities Engineering Bureau . 525.0 

Water 74.0 

Public Welfare . 

Public Works : 
Army Street Office ...... 

Engineering Office . 

Main Office 55.8 

Sewer Repair Division .... 

Purchasing 

Real Estate 

Recreation and Park 6,5 

Retirement System . 8.5 

Schools 1,064.5 

Sheriff 3.8 

Superior Court (Sec'y Records). 2.3 
Youth Guidance Center ..... 

totals • • • r^TsTu" 
-ii- 



268 


76 


16 




164 


4 


ii 




358 


20 


S 


2 


795 


125 


112 


70 


915 


367 


5,947 


215 




1 



26 



13,920 


16,339 


379 


22 


49 


1 


381 


12 


1,561 


411 


4 




12 




4.214 


2,498 


50 


7 


168 


92 


125 


183 


315 


1,490 


295 


229 


222 


4 


1,918 


280 


97 




47 




290 


21 



29 



733 


15 


173 


7 


41 




3 




1,070 


189 


105 


9 


1,283 


3 


1,461 


283 


188 


45 



37,755 



23,024 



11,768 


11,719 


12,°C2 


3,996 


4,304 


3,796 


2,234- 


2,451 


2,767 


2,503 


2,833 


3, HI 


2, 068 


1,800 


1,332 


152 


271 


202 


7,618 


7,629 


7,713 



COUNTY CLERK 

The County Clerk's Office serves as the ministerial arm and office of 
record of the Superior Court of the City md County of San Francisco. In 
addition, certain statutory indices are maintained, the principal ones being 
the Corporation index, the Partnerships and Fictitious Fames index, and the 
index of Notaries Public, iyiarriage licenses are issued by this department. 
Branch offices are located at the Hall of Justice, the Youth Quid- nee Center 
and at San Francisco General Hospital, 

3 Ye ar, .Summa ry Comparison 1964-65, 19.6$ r_66 1966-6? 

Superior Court Proceedings: 
Civil actions and petitions 
Probate petitions 
Criminal actions 
Juv. petns, no. of children 
Psychiatric petitions 
Appeals to Superior Court 
Marriage licenses issued 

Detailed operations of the various divisions of the County Clerk's 
Office are shown below: 

CASHIER'S DIVISION 

The revenue from fees collected in 1966-67 decreased from $277,077 
to ^2 74, 384. A comparative statement of fee revenue follows: 

1964-65 1965-66 1966-67 

Probate Department jj> 90,44-6 

General Department 123,34-5 

Civil Department 44,997 

ferriage License Dept. * 7,618 

Professional Registrations 267 

Total Office Fees $271,673 $277,077 |274,334 

* ferriage License Fees are now collected by the 
Recorder ' s Office , 

Fines, Law Library Fees and 196 4-6$ 1965-66 1966- -6.7 
Collections fpr_ Other, Departments : 

Marriage License Fees ,. 7,618 v 7,629 % 

Juvenile Court Fines 530 100 475 

Juvenile Court Traffic Fines 13,320 12,853 12,l6l 

Criii. Dept. Fines and Forfeitures 50,560 57,360 81,271 

Peace Officers Training Fund 3,639 5,344 7,929 

Payments to State Dept. of Pub. Health 1,245 3,688 5,586 

(Sec. 26859 Govt. Code) 

Law Library Fees 67,724 68,241 68,436 



-12- 



91,426 


t 57,098 


127,04.6 


129,897 


50,540 


49,272 


7,629 


7,713 


.„.A36 


AP_4 



,i'S DIVISION (Cont'd.) 



l?A4r.M 1965-66 



■^638,44.8 



.^655,936 



Fines, Law Library Fees and 
Collections f or Other Departme nts 

Sup. Ct. Reporters Salary Fund 

Total Fees and Fines Collected 

Trust Fund Deposits: 
Civil Court Deposits & Jury Fees 
Criminal Bail Deposits, Cash £ Bonds 8.250 57 j200 

Total Loney Collected #2,495, 763 .,2,238,490 

Exempt Services. No Fees Collected 4 31,973 i 33,760 

GENEPAL DIVISION 



1,849,065 1,525,354 



1966-67 

$227,156 
,,677,398 



1,141,025 
16,562 



40,263 



Hew Civil actions filed during the past fiscal year totaled 12,282 
compared with 11,719 in 1965-66. A breakdown of other filings f ollows : 



Civil actions 

Adoptions 

Certificates of Incorporation 

Cts.of Copartnership C. Fie. Names 1,141 

Official and notarial Bonds 

Oaths of Office 

The following is a classification by character of civil actions filed: 

1964-65 1965-66 1966-67 



19.64-65. 


1965-66 


1966-67 


11,768 


11,719 


12,282 


340 


342 


354 


949 


850 


880 


ies 1,141 


1,110 


942 


1,484 


1,168 


1,120 


1,863 


1,616 


1,664 



Over ,.3,000 to „ 5,000 


60 


77 


64 


ilore than ^5,000 


5,851 


5,849 


5,877 


Divorce 


2,975 


3,006 


3,183 


Annulment 


435 


440 


440 


Separate Maintenance 


184 


178 


181 


All Other Actions 


2,263 


2.169 


_2*52Z 


Totals 


11,768 


11,719 


12,282 


CIVIL 


DIVISION 








1964-65 


1965-66 


1966-67 


Disposition of Civil Actions: 








Judgts. by Jury 011 Verdict 


368 


368 


331 


Judgts. Misc. after Ct. Hearings 


1,985 


2,568 


4,262 


Judgts. on Default 


134 


106 


123 


Dismissals by Parties 


3,980 


3,867 


3,844 



•13- 



CIVIL DIVISION (Cont'd.) 

1964.-65 1965-66 19_66_-67 

Disposition of Civil Actions : 
Trsfrd. to other Jurisdictions 
Sep, Maint. Judgts. Grtcl. 
Annulments of Marriage Grtd. 
Interloc. Decrees of Div. Grtd. 
Final Decrees of Div. Grtd. 

A peals to District and Supreme 
Courts from Superior Court; 

Appeals Disposed of: 
ki firmed 
Modified 
Reversed 
Dismissed 

FROBATE DIVISION 

New Estate and guardianship proceedings .amounted to 3,896 compared 
with 4-, 304. for the previous fiscal yej.v. 



254 


282 


280 


30 


23 


25 


379 


383 


377 


2,431 


2,243 


2,386 


2,134- 


2,455 


2,323 


233 


291 


298 


48 


53 


34 


2 


8 


3 


27 


28 


15 


42 


41 


48 



1964-65. 1 965-66 1966-67 

Probate Proceedings Filed: 
Testate 
Intestate 
liissing Persons 

Guardianship Proceedings Filed: 
ixinor 

Incompetent 
Conservator 

Letters Issued: 
Testamentary 
Administration 

Administration with Will Annexed 
Special 
Guardi-inship 
Conservator 

CRIMINAL DIVISION 

Pour Courts hear criminal matters daily at the Hall of Justice. 
Statistics below are based on number of defendants : 

1964-65 196^66 1966-67 

New Actions Piled; 2,234 2,451 2,767 

Informations 1,705 1,929 2,182 



-Ik- 



2,135 


2,202 


2,035 


1,189 


1,222 


1,135 


3 


6 


3 


161 


187 


166 


339 


A77 


340 


169 


210 


217 


1,803 


1,966 


1,780 


892 


889 


888 


292 


265 


320 


147 


155 


167 


522 


644 


510 


188 


230 


251 



CRILIHAL DIVISION, (Cont'd.) 



•• .ctions Filed, (Cont'd.) 
Indictments 

Cert, from Muni. Ct. for Judgt. 
Cert, from Muni. Ct. Tor Hearing on 

Sexual Psychopathy 
Pets, for Cert, of Rehabilitation 
Cert, from Huni. Ct. for Hearing on 

Present Sanity 
Cert, from Muni. Ct. to Determine 

Harcotic Addiction 



19 64-65 



1965-66 



1966-67 



362 

23 


3^0 
29 


354 

43 


13 
2 


13 
6 


6 

3 


103 


126 


100 


21 


3 


6 



Disposition of Cases: 
Convicted after Pleas of 



Tolo 



Contendere 


20 




20 




44 


Convicted after Pleas of Guilty 


1,270 


1 


,410 


1 


,451 


Convicted after Court Trials 


313 




321 




313 


Convicted after Jury Trials 


114. 




34 




116 


Dismissed 


297 




320 




359 


Transferred to other Jurisdictions 


3 




9 




20 


Lc [uitted after Court Trials 


126 




145 




123 


Acquitted after Jury Trials 


52 




33 




23 


Sentenced to County Jail 


352 




309 




234 


Sentenced to State A-ison 


279 




228 




241 


ents of Death 


- 




1 




- 


Sentenced by Fines 


5 




4 




6 


Coi'i itted to Youth Authority 


34 




69 




61 


Committed as Sexual Psychopaths 


U 




9 




10 


Committed ~-s In;; .ne 


67 




74 




61 


Prob. Grtd., inc. Conditional .'rob. 


343 


1 


,043 


1 


,207 


Certs, of Rehabilitation Granted 


u 




6 




4 


Committed re: Harcotic Addiction 


11 




110 




119 


'ines and Hail Forfeitures Collected: 












Fines and . = nts 


$4.0,4.83 


-,45,32< 


,,■51 


,303 


. ,il Forfeitures 


6,000 


16, 


,226 


39 


,600 



'etitions for Writs of Habeas 
Corpus Filed; 



37 



65 



73 



Appeals to State Appellate Court: 

Ponding at Beginning of Year 
Filed During the Year 

Disposition of Appeals: 
Affirmed 

Hover sed 
Dismissed 

Pending 
-J andoncd 
Hodif ied 



75 


123 


123 


110 


105 


143 


22 


42 


56 


12 


12 


6 


24 


42 


50 


123 


128 


153 


2 


- 


- 


2 


4 


6 



-15- 



CRIMINAL DIVISION (Cont'd.) 

196.4d^t 1965-66 1966-67 

Coroner's Transcripts Filed ?.06 384 136 

JUVENILE COURT DIVISION 

The Juvenile Court meets every day at the Youth Guidance Center, 
375 Woodside --venue, San Francisco. Statistics follow: 

1964-65 19,65-66 1966-67 

Petitions Filed: 
Ptns. for Coram, of Dependent 

Children 499 482 462 

Number of Children 854 825 783 

Ptns. Filed on Delinquent 

Children 1,659 2,008 2,358 

Number of Children 1,659 2,008 2,358 

Suppl. ptns. Filed on Delinquent 

and Dependent Children 2,178 1,332 1,060 

Hearings by the Court: 
Detention 
Special 
Adoptions 
Guardianships 

Abandonments and Sole Custody 
Hearings. 

Number of records sealed — ■ 106 119 

Juvenile Traffic Hearings: 

Moving violations 4,970 4,531 5,074 

Fines Collected .13,275 ,A2,594 v 12,031 

STATE HOSPITAL C0UAT DIVISION 

The State Hospital Court meets at 2:00 EM every day at San Francisco 
General Hospital, 2450 Twenty-second Street. The Court Clerk is in attend- 
ance from 8 AM to 5 K- tbnday through Friday. 

1964-65 1965-66 1966-67 

Alleged Insane Persons: 
Examinations 

Committed to State Hospitals 
Examined and Discharged 

Intemperance and Use of Drugs: 
Examinations 1,145 313 179 



-16- 



2,798 


2,753 


564 


343 


300 


337 


40 


42 


11 


46 



1,686 


1,438 


1,130 


1,176 


812 


221 


510 


626 


909 



STATE HOSPITAL COURT DIVISION (Cont'd.) 
196^-65 1965-66 



Intemperance and Use of Drugs: 
Committed to State Hospitals 
Examined and Discharged 



933 
212 



Feeble Minded: 
Examinations 
Coram, to Home 



37 
for Feeble landed 37 

APPELLATE DIVISION 



195 
US 



49 
49 



1966-67 



13 
166 



23 

22 



Three judges of the San Francisco Superior Court .pointed by the 
Judicial Council, sit each Friday morning as the Appellate Department of the 
Superior Court. Appeals from the Municipal Court, Criminal and Civil, are 
heard by the Appellate Division. Appeals from the Small Claims Court are 
tried de novo. 



1364-65 



•47 



56 



Civil Appeals from Muni Court 
Filed During the Year : 

Disposition of Appeals: 
Affirmed 

modified 
Reversed 

Dismissed 

Prehearings Denied 

Under Submission or Pending 

Criminal Appeals from Muni Court 
Filed During the Year: 

Disposition of Appeals: 
Affirmed 
Revcrs d 

Dismissed 
Pending 

modified 
Abandoned 



Appeals from Smo.ll Claims Court 49 

Disposition of Small Claims Appeals : 
Af f irmed 
[ versed 
Dismissed 
Under Submission or Pending 



1965-66 



56 



157 



5S 



1966-67 



54 



19 


30 


32 





1 





10 


11 


9 


9 


14 


13 


6 


7 


4 


9 


13 


16 



102 



23 


50 


16 


10 


S 


2 


3 


33 


75 


14 


15 














1 


1 


1 



54 



22 


23 


33 


12 


19 


12 


8 


9 


4 


7 


9 


9 



-17- 



LICENSE DIVI3I01I 

Marriage licenses issued, in 1966-67 totaled 7,713? 84 more than the 

previous fiscal year. There were 2,323 decrees of divorce entered, or 132 
less than in 1965-66. 

L<L6^6j> 1965-66 1966-67 

I Carriage Licenses Issued 7,618 7,629 7,713 

A-ofes^ional Registrations 187 218 202 



•18- 



RECORDER 
1966-67 



The Recorder's office, as required by law, receives for recording 
all papers or notices that may legally be recorded, makes and keeps a 
true copy of the original, indexes the sane, and arranges the books of 
record and indices in suitable places to facilitate their inspection. 

A program for microfilmin^ old records dating back to the 1906 fire 
was started in 1960-61. Funds to continue this project were appropriated 
each year since that time, and 1,763 old record books were microfilmed in 
1966-67. 

In Decs fiber 1966, we vicated about 1300 square feet of floor space 
in our basement to make room for expansion of the Centrex teleohone system. 
Some of our records were trunsf arred from the basement to an area on our 
mezzanine floor which had been uade available by microfilming and destroy- 
ing old record books. Unclaimed original documents which were recorded 
from 1925 to 1951 were removed to the Records Center, a new law x^ill permit 
us to destroy these documents later this year. 

Breakdown of recei ots follows : 

Rec eipts 1964-65 1965-66 1966-67 

Recording fees $252,936.40 $209,340.20 $153,324.00 

Special Service fees 12,053.00 13,571.90 12,497.25 

ferriage license recording fees 7,313.00 7,623.00 7,312.00 

$272,362.40 $231,040.10 $17^,133.25 



hxpenditures 

Salaries $168,458.03 $177,119.30 +179, 735-56 

Other 18,512.16 14,345.87 24,333.45 

$186,970.19 $191,465.67 h>204,624.01 
Excess, receipts over expenditures 85,392.21 $39,574.43 - ? 30, 4?0.76 

Receipts listed do not include desk rental fees collected last 
fiscal year by the Real Estate Departmont for desk siace in the Recorder's 
office used by title comjanies, record searchers, etc. Neither do they 
include $12,225.40 estimated work for 3,726 papers (5,765 pages) of 
"official", or free recordings; that is, the service rendered to war 
veterans, deoendents of war veterans, compensation and pension claims, 



-19- 



old age pension clair.is and miscellaneous Federal, State or other political 
subdivision recordings; which service is required by State law to be 
performed without fees. 

.in additional ,^250 could be added for oth r free "ork performed as 
a courtesy to other City and County de zart.aents. 

The monthly breakdown of recording and filing fee receipts follows: 

1964-65 196 5-66 1966-67 

July ^25,524.75 ,21,979.70 $14,235.15 

August 22,344.05 20,349.70 15, 423.50 

September ... 20,868.50 13,299.30 13,131.95 

October 23,123. 30 20,203.20 13,541.55 

November 21,354.00 19,327.25 12,906.15 

December 22,922.30 20, 361.30 13,449.90 

January 21,601. 70 13, 609.30 12,955-35 

February 21,431.90 17,402.45 13,253.20 

March 24,6.20.55 21,521.70 17,268.90 

April 23,979.55 13,371.75 14,796.95 

May 21,164.35 16,251.40 16, 143.50 

June 23,377.45 16,363.05 16,967. 15 

^272,362.40 $231,040.10 ^174,133.25 

Documents Fil e d a n d Re corded 

The following are the orincipal classifications of the 70,392 docu- 
ments filed and racorded during 1966-67. For comparative purposes, lists 
for two preceding fiscal years are included: 

1964-65 1965-66 1 966-67 

.affidavits of Death 1,457 1,268 1,236 

Agreements 360 279 279 

Decrees 2,033 1,063 359 

Deeds 13,390 14,377 11,210 

Deeds of trust 22,565 17,4o6 10,303 

Judgments and Abstracts 2,663 2,961 3.573 

iiscellaneous 37,173 36,779 23,590 

ililitary Discharges 526 432 348 

Financial Statements 11,254 7,275 6,637 

Mort-a:es of Real Property 467 4l6 303 

Notices of Default 1,513 1,531 1,574 

Reconveyances 2§,2?1 16,204 9,405 

Tax Liens - Federal 1,117 1,149 1,520 

Total 119,349 101,640 70,392 



-20- 



The figures below show recordings of deeds, mortgages, and deeds 
of trust for the past 10 years: 



Fiscal Year 


Deeds 


Mortgages 


Deads of Trust 


1957-58 


16,516 


653 


14,188 


1958-59 


13,308 


807 


17,097 


1959-60 


17,350 


663 


16,791 


1960-61 


17,147 


525 


18,710 


1961-62 


18,680 


548 


21,942 


1962-63 


19,707 


536 


24,175 


1963-64 


18,379 


552 


22,404 


1964-65 


13,390 


467 


22,565 


1965-66 


14,877 


416 


17,406 


1966-67 


11,210 


303 


10,303 



The following table lists the number of oarri ges performed in San 
Francisco since 1947-48: 



1947-43 9,629 

1943-49 8,465 

1949-50 7,397 

1950-51 3,195 

1951-52 7,220 

1952-53 7,359 

1953-54 6,711 

1954-55 C,636 

1955-56 6,526 

195^-67 6,395 



1957-58 6,502 

1953-59 6,595 

1959-60 6,629 

1960-61 6,538 

1961-62 6,602 

1962-63 6,736 

1963-6'4 7,215 

1964-65 7,160 

1965-66 7,377 

1966-67 7,793 



-21- 



ANNUAL REPORT 
DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 
Fiscal Year 1067-68 



The work performed by the San Francisco Weights & 
Measures Department is the enforcement of State laws primarily 
concerned with commercial transactions involving determination 
of quantity, length, and size, together with some specialized 
activities such as advertising, quality of anti-freeze, brake 
fluid, transmission oil, and Public Weighmaster control. These 
duties are performed by a Sealer, a Senior Inspector, six 
Inspectors, and a Senior Clerk Typist, working out of an office 
in the City Hall, at an approximate per capita cost of lie. 

History and experience dictate that we cannot hope for 
budget dollars to grow as rapidly as a runaway economy. This 
results in an obligation to carefully analyze the best possible 
method to expend the funds allotted to our program. Intelligent 
use of the tools and the equipment available to us, coupled 
with long range planning and proper utilization of manpower, 
is what we intend to use to produce the best possible program. 

Until the beginning of this century, the history of 
merchandising in packages labored under a rather dubious 
reputation for quality and reliability of its quantity 
declarations. Handmade bottles and cans were fabricated with 
little concern for uniform dimensions and capacity; if they 
were airtight - that was the important factor. But the 
customer could not see it, smell it, or as a rule, try a sample, 
without first buying it. The first sale was made on trust or 
curiosity, but the second sale had to be made on merit and 
the 8000 items now offered in modern Super Markets attest to 
the success of modern merchandising. 

Weights and Measures inspection and control plays a 
large role in this program as is witnessed by this extract 
from the SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER of June 2, 1967, quoting a 
report from the National Bureau of Standards, the parent force 
of Weights and Measures, "The trust in its findings is such 
that few of us ever weigh a sack of potato chips to see if we 
got gypped, seldom pour a quart of milk from its bottle or 
carton into a measuring container to see if we've been had". 

The result of recent National Legislation will begin 
to be felt on July 1, 1967. The most noticeable change will 
be the increased size and prominent placing of the declarations 
of quantity, ingredients, number of servings, and accuracy of 
the illustrations of the contents on all labels. These 
changes reflect the intent of Government to protect consumers 
and honest business from deception and unscrupulous competition. 



-22- 



In San Francisco we attribute our success in maintaining 
the highest level of accuracy in correct package weight to our 
continuing program of inspection and our use of the sampling 
system legalized in 1961, which enables us to inspect thousands 
of packages instead of ten. 

Our "device" program comprises the annual inspection of 
almost all commercial apparatus used to establish volume, count, 
or weight. This inspection is the keystone that allows us to 
protect not only the producer or packer and the consumer, but 
a sometime overlooked phase of this protection, our own 
Government, which could not exist in its present form without 
weighing. Tax is collected on vehicles weighed over motor truck 
scales to determine the license fee. Highways are built for 
definite weight capacities, and trucks are regularly tested by 
axle-load scales to assure that they are not overloaded. The 
tax collected on whiskey and tobacco, two important sources 
of revenue for our Federal Government, is determined by weight. 
Even the size of a loaf of bread, as well as many other 
commodities, is set by law, according to weight. Letters and 
Parcel Post move by weight and our Spac.„ Program would not be 
possible without the accuracy and reliability of modern 
weighing and measuring instruments. All of these are dependent 
on our inspection in various degrees. Cnce more a quote from 
the SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER of June 2, 1967, "American industry 
has i>24 billion invested in measuring instruments today, buys 
$4.5 billion of additional instruments each year, pays 510 
billion in salaries each year to people who do nothing but check 
on what is an ounce and when is a gram, how is the watt and 
what happened to the neutron. Jeeves! Where's that jigger?". 

We have modified the procedure authorized for package 
inspection to our use in taxi meter testing. As each test 
requires a minimum of one hour, we would not otherwise have 
enough manpower to perform this function. We believe that the 
use of the flexibility inherent in this system gives us control 
of this phase of our work. 

In the past year the results of past training are 
beginning to be evident. These programs were triggered by the 
need for advice and help on: 

1. New trends that are encountered by 
those at the enforcement level. 

2. Problems that may require legislation. 

3. Problems requiring increased departmental 
or bureau co-operation. 

4. The up-grading of minimum qualifications 
for the examinations in the several 
programs. 



-23- 



All of which moans that we should be better prepared 
for the changes that we and our friends in industry and 
merchandising must face. 

Only a few years ago, every state - yes, sometimes 
every community - had varying standards, but now our calibra- 
tion tools arc so accurate that they probably exceed the 
practical ability of the normal small business man or his 
customers to fully utilize the precision that we are able to 
supply. 

We then submit the following summary of the work 
performed in the past year, believing that the quality is 
good and that we have successfully served the people of 
San Francisco in our field. 



-2k- 



There were 70 complaints received and adjusted in 1966-67 
by Departmental Inspectors and 34 "Orders to Conform" issued* 
A total of 1,657,353 packages was inspected, of which 51,652 
were found to be "Short Weight." 



Type 


Sealed 


Adjusted 


Condemned 


Conf 


iscated 


Scales: 












Counter 


2,172 


306 


108 







Spring 


2,441 


305 


21 




3 


Computing 


6,125 


428 


81 




4 


Heavy Capacity 


2,438 


367 


110 




9 


Person Weighers 


332 


53 


85 




6 


Pre script ion (Drugs) 


322 


17 


5 







Weights: 












Drug 


13,541 


4 







184 


Commercial 


9,901 


136 







55 


Measures: 












Retail Pumps 


4,934 


70 


387 







Grease Meters ) 
Lube Oil Meters) 


543 


1 


10 







Yardage Meters 


111 













Liquid Measures 


1,971 


2 










Wholesale Meters 


6 


2 


5 







Taximeters 


11 


1 


4 








TOTALS 44,848 1,692 816 261 

COMPARISON OF WORKLOAD F .CTORS 

1Q64-65 1965-66 1966-67 

Certificates Issued 13,870 14,469 14,18;? 

Scales Tested 12,804 15,134 19,719 

Weights Inspected 24,342 23,167 25,460 

Gas Pumps Inspected 5,375 5,285 5,356 

Other Measuring Devices Tested 3,718 2,641 4,218 

Containers Inspected 1,844,811 2,059,899 1,657,353 

Miscellaneous - Other Calls 1,450 1,827 2,000 



-25- 



COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
AGRICULTURAL COMMISSIONER 

ANNUAL REPORT 
1966 - 1967 

The general purpose and responsibilities of this department include the 
following : 

To promote and protect the agricultural industry. 

To protect and benefit both the grower and the consumer 
by enforcing the provisions of the Agricultural Code. 

Within the authority delegated to us, to promote and pro- 
tect the health and welfare of our citizens. 

The Agricultural Commissioner is a County Officer; as such, he heads the 
Comity Department of Agriculture. He must plan and direct staff members in the 
proper enforcement of all provisions of the California State Agricultural Code 
and the City and County regulations which pertain to the Office of the County 
Agricultural Commissioner. This includes the inspection of fruits, vegetables, 
eggs, nuts, honey, poultry and rabbit meats in wholesale and retail establish- 
ments; the inspection of nurseries, seed firms, apiaries, post offices, express 
and freight terminals, for plant diseases, insect pests and plant quarantine 
requirements; the conducting of insect pest surveys and the maintaining of var- 
ious insect traps; and the certification of agricultural products being ex- 
ported to foreign countries in order to meet the requirements of freedom from 
pests and diseases. 

The Agricultural Commissioner, under the California Disaster Plan, is 
designated as the County Food Administrator under the supervision of the Cali- 
fornia Director of Agriculture. One of his duties is to compile a food inventory 
of wholesale firms and private and public warehouses, which has been done by this 
department. There are 150 such firms and warehouses in San Francisco. The infor- 
mation was placed on data processing cards and is available for use in time of 
disaster. 

The export certification work has increased slightly. This is due to 
additional moneys being released to importers in the foreign countries for the 
purpose of purchasing agricultural commodities. 

The number of retail stores inspected as to fruit, vegetables, eggs, 
honey, and poultry meat, has increased. 

San Francisco County has 2 farms that produce vegetables on approximately 
5 acres, and Ik grower nurseries that produce potted plants and cut flowers in 
1,000,000 square feet of glasshouses, with a total gross value of 31, 229,292. 

Revenue Fr om Two Sources : 

Revenue received in 1966-67, consisted of 33,300.00 from the State to aug- 
ment the salary of the San Francisco Agricultural Commissioner, and 35,526.^6 
from export certification fees. 

-26- 



In addition to the duties listed above, the Chief Administrative Officer 
has delegated to the Agricultural Commissioner the supervision of the Farmers' 
Market, including its functions and personnel. 

Following is a comparison breakdown of inspection services provided: 

ft 

PLANT QUARANTINE 

All shipments of nursery stock and plants, plant products including fruit, 
seed and grain, used agricultural implements and appliances; are required to be 
held for inspection upon first arrival in the county in order to prevent the entry 
of plant diseases, insects, noxious weeds or seeds, which may be detrimental to 
agriculture. The post office, railway express, freight yards and commercial truck- 
ing concerns are visited daily for this inspection. In addition, many plants are 
inspected at nurseries. 

In many cases treatment can be applied to plants rejected, thus insuring 
cleanliness; and the commodities may then be released. 



Plant Quarantine 



1964-65 



1965-66 



1966-67 



Number of Premises 


236 


236 


240 


Shipments Inspected 
Plants Inspected 
Plants ^ejected 
Total Han Hours 


11,899 

9,103,316 

145,075 

1,859 


7,537 
8,910,645 

4,219 
1,659 


0,576 
10,285,382 
3,169 
1,482}£ 




STANDARDIZATION 





This is one of the major functions of this department. It relates to the 
inspection of fruits, nuts, vegetables, eggs, poultry meat, and honey, at the 
wholesale produce terminal, retail stores, and any other place where produce is 
offered for sale. This is to insure the enforcement of the requirements govern- 
ing the quality, packing and marketing of these products, '/e inspect and certify 
loads of commodities moving interstate or intrastate; and to foreign countries 
when requested by shippers, to show compliance with California's standardization 
requirements : 



Wholesale Produce Market: 



1964-65 



1965-66 



1966-67 



Number of Premises 


45 


Premises Inspected 


10,626 


Rejection Tags 


1,565 


Packages Rejected 


71,360 


Packages Inspected 


6,958,702 


Stores: 




Number of Premises 


2,l40 


Premises Inspected 


1,59^ 


Rejection Tags 


251 


Packages Rejected 


5,159 



Packages Inspected 



101,111 



46 


47 


11,454 


11,^30 


1,549 


1,006 


74,653 


56,825 


5,492,154 


6,734,254 


2,l4l 


2,142 


1,687 


2,303 


225 


237 


1,404 


1,431 


194,941 


244,336 



-27- 



STANDARDIZATION - continued 



Farmers' Marke t 1964-65 19^-66 1966-67 

Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Rejection Tags 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 

Total Man Hours for all 

Produce Inspection 5,505 5,699 5,594/2 



45 


45 


45 


12,800 


12,850 


12,950 


17 


40 


18 


471 


1,829 


302 


176,611 


160,901 


146,698 



Who le sale Eggs : 



Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Dozens Rejected 
Dozens Inspected 


20 

680 

178,789 

1,048,656 


Retail Eggs 




Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Dozens Rejected 
Dozens Inspected 


2,131 

1,896 

75,514 

450,906 



20 19 

617 649 

205,078 158,130 

1,011,084 848,952 



2,132 2,133 

1,972 2,611 

135,066 103,702 

664,659 790,239 

Total Man Hours for Whse. 

& Retail Egg Inspection 3,955 3,712 3,648 

Poultry Meat 



Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 

Total Man Hours - Poultry 
Honey 


929 

1,270 

2,262 

79,199 

384 

2,145 

1,729 

229 

140,793 


930 

1,289 

8,841 

120,140 

450 y 2 

2,147 

1,542 

715 

123,224 


930 
1,688 
2,098 

160,192 

524 


Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 


2,148 

1,795 

561 

173,346 



Total Man Hours - Honey 430 365. Yz 499/2 

TOTAL MAN HOURS FOR ALL 

STANDARDIZATION 10,274 10,227 10,066 



-28- 



NURSERY INSPECTION 



All nurseries within the county are inspected at periodical intervals for 
the presence of pests, and for compliance with Grades and Standards. If serious 
pests are found, eradication measures must be taken immediately by the nursery. 
All plants must be correctly labeled with the botanical name. 

1964-65 1965-66 1966-67 

Number 'of Nurseries 132 184 182 

Premises Inspected 221 215 199 

Total Han Hours 498 425 508 1 /2 



SEED INSPECTION 

This involves the inspection and sampling of agricultural and vegetable 
seed lots at wholesale and retail locations for proper labeling as to germination 
and weed seeds. 



1964-65 1965-66 1966-67 



145 


143 


140 


78 


90 


190 


133 


152/2 


236 1 / 2 



Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Total Man Hours 



EXPORT CERTIFICATION 

This is the inspection of fruits and vegetables going to foreign countries, 
and is done to insure the plant quarantine and standardization requirements of 
those countries. A fee is charged for this work. 

1964-65 1965-66 1966-67 

Certificates Issued 1,495 l,94l 1,705 

Packages Inspected 177,920 252,507 267,344 



DISPOSAL ORDER S ISSUED AT WHOLESALE PRODUCE TERiJIIAL 

Disposal orders are issued for produce that has been rejected, or has been 
on hand too long. It is not salvageable. 

1964-65 1965-66 1966-67 

Disposal Orders Issued 1,657 l,74l 1,530 

Number of Packages 4l,294 97,794 43,283 



-29- 



PEST SURVEYS AND PEST CONTROLS 



Detection surveys are important for determining the possible presence 
of new and dangerous agricultural pests. If pests can be discovered before they 
become too v/idely distributed, then there is a greater possibility of eradication. 

Pest control operators are licensed by the State Department of Agriculture. 
They must register with the Commissioner of the county in which the work is to 
be done. 

State regulations specify conditions of workmanship, and the precautions 
in application under direction of the Agricultural Commissioner. 



196^-65 



1965-66 



1966-67 



Number of Fruit Fly Traps 50 

Number of Japanese Beetle Traps 20 

Permits Issued to Pest Control 

Operators l*t 
Permits Issued for Use of Injuri- 
ous Herbicides 18 
Permits Issued for Use of Injuri- 
ous Materials 9 

Total Man Hours 217 



30 


30 


16 


15 


15 


13 


16 


17 


5 


k 


204 


250 



RELATED FUNCTIONS 



This includes the other varied activities such as giving garden advice to 
home owners, the gathering of crop statistics, certifying official fumigation 
chambers, and performing general public relations work. 



-30- 



SAN FEAECISCO FARMERS' MARKET 



The San Francisco Fanners' Market opened on August 12, 1943 > during the 
war time as an outlet for surplus and distressed crops from neighboring counties. 
Its first location was at Market Street and Duboce Avenue, and was operated by 
the farmers themselves. The City and County assumed management on August 1st, 
1944- The Farmers' Market opened at its present location, 100 Alemany Boule- 
vard on August 4> 1947 » under a City Ordinance which authorizes the Chief 
Administrative Officer to establish a Farmers' Market to be administered by him 
or by any department under his jurisdiction. It is now under the super-vision 
of the Agricultural Commissioner who reports to the Chief Administrative Officer 
through the Director of Finance and Records. 

The Farmers' Market Ordinance requires that fees charged shall be suffi- 
cient to pay the operating end maintenance costs of the Market, and in addition 
to repay the City and County within a reasonable period, any capital improvements 
at the Market. During the 1965-66 fiscal year, 40 feet of roof was added to 
the south row of stalls at the east end of the Market. This capital improvement 
provided the Market with much needed additional covered stall space at a cost 
of $10,266.33. As of June 30, 1967, $314,744.22 had been repaid to the City. 
This is $56,067.17 in excess of the cost of the land and capital improvements 
at the Farmers' Market, which amounted to $258,677.05. 



Sales Promotion: 



Sales at the Market are promoted through news releases to newspapers, radio 
and television stations, and other outlets. We also mail Growers Certificated and 
new information about the Market to all growers who have used the Market in recent 
years. Informational letters concerning the Market are sent to all County 
Agricultural Conrrd.ssion.ers. 



The Market operates on a five day week, Tuesday through Saturday, from 
7:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. 



The Market celebrated its Twenty-third Anniversary from August 8th to 
13th, 1966. This period had been proclaimed "Farmers' Market Twenty-third 
Anniversary Week" by Mayor John F. Shelley. 



-31- 



The breakdown below summarizes the Farmers' Market Capital Expenditures 
Program as of June 50, 1967- The City and County of San Francisco has been 
reimbursed for capital expenditures through the excess revenue each year. 

Capital Expenditures ; (Adjusted to agree with Controller' s figures 1963-64) 

Land $ 53,032.15 

Improvements 205,644»90 

Total $ 258,677.05 

Revenue and Operating Expenses : 

Revenues 717,421.31 

Less Operating Expenses . . . 402,677.09 

314,744.22 
Excess of Net Revenue Over 
Capital Expenditures .... $ 56,067.17 



RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE FARMERS' MARKET: 



The following projects are necessary for the maintenance of the Farmers' Market 
north row of stall spaces and the administration building: 



1. The roof over the north rov; of stalls has been leaking during 
the rainy season. This row of stalls is of wood construction 
with a tar and gravel roof. Re-roofing is needed for the pro- 
tection of the growers and of produce packed in cardboard 
containers. 

2. The inside of the administration building needs painting to 
maintain the appearance of the office, conference room 
supply room and rest rooms. Painting will also prevent 
deterioration of the walls and woodwork. 



-32- 



COKPARISON SUMMARY : 

The following tabulation is a summary of Farmers' Karket revenues, operating 
expenses, capital costs, and stall and tonnage fees from 1946 through June 30, 
1967; 



Fiscal 




Operating 


Excess of 


Stalls 




Year 


Revenues 


Expenses 


Revenue 


Rented 


Tonnage 


1946-47 


$ 16,006.50 


$ 4,101.48 


$ 11,905.02 


_ 


* 


1947-48 


19,748.00 


14,747.81 


5,020.19 


15,428 


6,065 


1948-49 


26,287.50 


15,285.47 


11,002.03 


17,267 


10,668 


1949-50 


32,190.50 


12,458.77 


19,731.73 


20,895 


11,695 


1950-51 


20,601.50 


21,231.69 


-(630.19) 


13,556 


7,337** 


1951-52 


29,363.50 


21,651.73 


7,711.77 


14,431 


8,156 


1952-53 


33,403-25 


18, 37/,.. 48 


15,028,77 


18,726 


8,813 


1953-54 


37,423.50 


18,670.37 


18,753.13 


20,662 


9,497 


1954-55 


37,916.25 


18,661.35 


19,254.90 


21,495 


9,481 


1955-56 


35,142.00 


17,675.67 


17,466.33 


20,755 


7,927 


1956.-57 


34,812.06 


18,454.77 


16,357.29 


20,584 


8,019 


1957-58 


34,844,00 


19,148.69 


15,695,31 


20,659 


7,694 


1956-59 


40,934.00 


22,475.18 


18,458,82 


22,712 


6 ; 835 


1959--0 


46,650,7s 


1?>583,62 


27,267.13 


22,128 


6,006 


1960-61 


47,159.50 


20,708.90 


26,450.60 


22,461 


6,651 


1961-62 


41,765 75 


25,129.64 


16,540.11 


21,012 


5,675 


1962-63 


33,763.75 


20,252.25 


18,331.50 


18,683 


5,244 


1963-64 


3?,5U.C0 


21,863,44 


15,677-56 


13,367 


4,897 


1964-65 


36,058,00 


23,156.33 


12,901.67 


17,898 


4,396 


1965-66 


35,892.00 


24,318.17 


11,573.83 


17,847 


4,085 


1966-67 


34,714.00 


24.767.28 


9,946.72 


17,288 


3,668 




717,421.31 


402,677.09 


314,744.22 


382,854 


143,709 



* Records are incomplete for fiscal year. 

** Market was closed from February to July due to 

construction of new stalls. 



The decrease in gross revenue for the year is the result of less tonnage 
being brought into the Market and fewer stalls being rented. This condition 
is the result of: 

1. The rain and cold weather from January through June 1967. 

This unfavorable weather was the cause of severe losses of crops 
and the late maturing of those crops which were not lost. 
The loss to the Market is 559 fewer stall spaces rented and 
417 tons less produce brought into the Market in fiscal year 
1966-67 as compared with the previous fiscal year 1965-66. 
The loss in gross receipts to the Market is $1178.00 for 
1966-67 as compared with 1965-66. 

2. Less acreage under cultivation because small farmers are 
selling their farm land for sub-dividing. 

-33- 



ISTRAR CF VOTERS 
19S.6 - 1967 

3y authority of Charter Section 173 and the State Elections Code, the 
Eegistrar of Voters is responsible for the conduct, management and control 
of the registration of voters, and of the holding of elections and of all 
other matters pertaining to elections in the City and County. The small 
permanent staff has remained constant for many years. This force is augmented 
by seasonal workers, as required, during the registration and election periods. 
On Election Day, about ^500 precinct officials are employed. 

The November 19^6 General Election was held, at which the newly created 
10th Senatorial District in San Francisco was filled by former Supervisor 
George Moscone. 

Late in Kay, San Francisco's 9th Senatorial District representative. 
J. Eugene McAteer died unexpectedly. 

Governor ..eagan immediately called a Special Election (which necessitated 
a Primary Election to be held prior), but reports on these two elections are 
properly a part of the next fiscal year's business. 

In June, registrar Chas. A. Hogers and Assistant Registrar Alex McCarthy, 
both retired. 

Basil Kealey was reclassified from Tax Collector to replace Degistrar 
Kogers, and Assistant Public Guardian Frank I?. Quinn was reclassified to 
replace Mr. McCarthy. 

Population Changes 

San Francisco's population appears static, but great mobility of residents 
exists. In the past decade, the number of registered voters has declined due 
to decreasing population and the greater decrease in the City's adult popula- 
tion. This population decrease has not reduced the work load because the 
population has been more transitory and mobile due to large scale demolitions 
and reconstruction in conjaectien with wartime housing projects and the 
Redevelopment programs. These dislocations do not increase our total regis- 
tration, but do require new registrations and cancellation of old registra- 
tions. Much of this activity is now being stabilized, and it is believed 
that as certain areas are occupied, the new registrants will be likely to 
remain at these locations. 

In accordance with State lav/, the registrants who failed to vote at the 
November 1966 General Election were removed from the rolls. Approximately 
7^,000 names were deleted despite our double postcard notice to each such 
registrant that we were in the process of cancelling his registration. 

The current registration figure is approximately 303,000, which will 
probably increase to around 320,000 for voter eligibility at the November, 
1967 General Municipal Election. 

-34- 



E.D.P. 

Our conversion to data processing is proceeding satisfactorily. We will 
have indexes prepared by the E.D.P. Bureau for our November election, and the 
availability of information that is currently being placed on magnetic tape 
will give us certain advantages we do not now possess, 

CONCLUSION 

This report is not as comprehensive nor as detailed as is customary. 
Actually, I was only in the Office for the last month (June) of the year that 
this report covers, and cannot write authoritatively on what took place in 
the preceding eleven months other than the highlights. I feel that it would 
be presumptuous for me to comment on certain aspects of both internal and 
external procedures and policies until I have had the time and experience 
prerequisite to a valid appraisal. 

Some changes have already been made and others are under contemplation. 
However, I do not want to proceed too rapidly in areas that should be subject 
to detailed analysis. 

5 -Year Workload Comparison 



Regular elections (number) 

Registration affidavits 
processed 

Registration affidavits 
canceled 

Sample ballots mailed 

Absentee ballots requested 
(paper) 

Absentee vote (paper) 

Absentee vote (machine) 

Frecincts used 

Voting Machines used 

Voting machines loaned/ 
leased 

Precinct vote (machines) 

Total votes cast 

Employee group elections 

(ballots) 13,651 



1962-63 


1963-64 


1964 .65 


1965-66 


1966-67 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


79,301 


81,394 


64,638 


54,333 


73,192 


120,219 


41,382 


82,908 


38,390 


74,109 


384,470 


785,323 


389,900 


701,^97 


372,123 


7,745 


8,224 


14,193 


7,615 


12,370 


6,708 


7,160 


12,602 


6,794 


10,613 


4,037 


7,451 


5,287 


5,780 


5,793 


1,332 


3,l40 


1,341 


2,686 


.1,340 


1,640 


3,761 


1,670 


3,275 


1,670 


327 


233 


274 


313 


260 


285,054 


527,320 


313,723 


425,249 


328,591 


295,799 


541,931 


331,612 


438,656 


372,188 



-35- 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR - PUBLIC GUARDIAN ( 1966-67) 



Public A dministrator 

The Public Administrator is an officer of the County Government 
as described in Section 24000 of the Government Code and as provided 
for in the Charter of the City and County of San Francisco. The pur- 
pose of the office is to provide for the protection of the property 
of deceased persons and for the protection of the interests of heirs 
and creditors in such property. 

The duties of the Public Administrator as both a conservator 
and an administrator of the estates of deceased persons is set forth 
in Section ll50 of the Probate Code, as follows: "The Public Adminis- 
trator of each county must take immediate charge of the property 
within his county of persons who have died when no executor or admin- 
istrator has been appointed and in consequence thereof the property, 
or any part thereof, is being wasted, uncared for or lost; and of all 
estates ordered into his hands by the Court. He shall apply for letters 
of administration upon estates of decedents who have no known heirs 
when the Superior Court of his county has jurisdiction thereof, and 
may apply for such letters upon any other estate upon which he is 
entitled to administer." 

All functions pertaining to each estate are handled by the 
office staff. These functions include - the investigation, making 
funeral arrangements, applications for letters, collection of all 
assets, payment of all legal debts, sales of real and personal property, 
filing and defending suits, obtaining all county, state, and Federal 
tax clearances, and distribution to heirs and the State of California. 
A complete and thorough investigation must be made of each estate 
reported - without a proper investigation there could be a loss of 
revenue to the county as well as a loss to the creditors and heirs. 

Investigation of Cases 

Approximately kO per cent of the cases investigated are adminis- 
tered by the Public Administrator's Office. The remaining 60 per cent 
either have no assets or are turned over to the named executor or 
administrator who may have a priority to serve. The above is one of the 
service functions of this office. 

5 Year Workload Comparison 

I963-6U 196U-65 1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 
Actual Actual Actual Actual Estimated 

Estates Investigated 1,297 1,359 1,362 1,376 1,U00 

<ew Estates Opened 5^9 505 609 560 550 

r inal Accounts Filed 3^3 253 190 2§9 350 

)ischarges Filed 305 313 309 587 550 

(end of year) 1,207 1,399 1,699 1,772 1,800 

Revenue from Fees $215, 6ll $193,442 $193,000 $258,000 $200,000 

•perating Expenses $l49,l60 $154,996 $166,000 $162,000 $181,000 

(et Revenue $ 66,510 $ 38,546 $ 27,000 $ 96,000 $ 19,000 



-36- 



The Public Administrator's Office is entirely self-supporting 
and as a matter of fact produces a profit for the City and County of 

San Francisco out of the revenues received from the estates of 

decedents. These revenues pay not only for the services in the general 

estates, but also for the free services provided in investigating 

decedents' deaths where no estates are ever opened by the Public 
Administrator . 

Efficiency of Administration 

The fact that the Public Administrator does receive statutory 
fees in the general probates also imposes some obligation on him to 
the heirs and creditors to at least give them the same attention as 
would private administrators. Heirs are frequently prepared to be 
critical of the Public Administrator's Office, especially in those 
cases in which they have been denied the right to probate the estate 
because of their non-residence. They feel that, if they had been 
allowed to administer the estate, they could do a much more efficient 
job and a much speedier job than the Public Administrator. As a 
matter of fact, the Public Administrator's Office would not bow to any 
other administrator whether a corporate institution, such as a bank, 
or a private individual, as to the efficiency and speed with which 
probate matters are administered. 

The public, of course, is not aware of this and the constant 
problem of attempting to please the unreasonable as well as the 
reasonable segments of the public means that every step, must be taken 
that will insure a more efficient use of the staff. Actually, most 
expenditures which could be made to increase efficiency would, in fact, 
not be additional expense, but rather an investment to return more 
income to the City. There is every indication that the number of 
cases and the amount of money to be returned in estates will, during 
the years, continue to increase. The sooner these cases can be pro- 
cessed to completion, the sooner the fees are returned to the City 
treasury . 

10 Year Comparison - Expenditures and Revenues 

Budgeted Actual 
Fiscal Expendi- Expendi- Differ- Estimated Actual Differ- 
Year tures tures ence Revenue Revenue ence 

1957-58 $109,610 $106,009 $-3,601 $180,000 $179,039 $- 961 

1958-59 115, U5U llU.215 -1,239 180,000 176,538 - 3,1+62 

1959-60 118,185 115,716 -2,1+69 185,000 205, 2U9 20,21*9 

1960-61 13U.65U 129,7^2 -U.912 200,000 203,570 3,570 

196l-62 1 \.t cnn -i-iQ-t£t QTcn ni n nr\n tR-i£co nflol.P 

1962-63 
1963-6U 



XJ'+jU^H liJ,|HC -H,^X£: CVUjUUU CUJ,>|U J , J I 1- 

1U7,520 138,761 -8,759 210,000 181,652 -28,31+6 

150,721 11+7,190 -3,531 200,000 230,508 30,508 

155,791 ll+9,l60 -6,631 207,000 215,610 8,610 

162,1+1+1 15l+,996 -7,850 200,000 193,1+1+2 - 6,558 

1965-66 171,1+78 166,276 -5,202 200,000 192,61+5 - 7,355 

1966-67 158,1+25 162,033 3,608 200,000 257,500 57,500 

1967-68 171,000 200,000 



-37- 



Public Guardian 

The office of Public Guardian was created in San Francisco 
County on July 1, I960, under authority of Section 5175 of the Welfare 
and Institutions Code of the State of California. On July 1, I960, 
the Public Administrator became ex officio Public Guardian. The pur- 
pose of the office is to provide a public officer to serve, when needed, 
as guardian of the person and/or estate of persons who are patients in 
county facilities or recipients of aid under the Welfare and Institu- 
tions Code. 



The Public Guardian, lik 
Court, has the care and custody 
management of his estate until 
the guardianship of a minor, un 
or the ward marries at 18 or ov 
just debts as far as the estate 
ward's real property or borrcwi 
collect all debts due the ward, 
ward in all actions or proceedi 
frugally and without waste and 
the convenience, suitable suppo 



e any other guardian appointed by the 

of the person of his ward and the 
legally discharged, or in the case of 
til the minor reaches the age of majority 
er. The guardian must pay the ward's 

is able, if necessary, selling the 
ng on it. He must demand, sue for and 
He must appear for and represent the 
ngs . He must manage the ward's estate 
apply the income as far as necessary to 
rt , maintenance, and age of the ward. 



He must file an inventory of all the estate's assets, together 
with an appraisal of the assets, unless the estate consists of money 
only, or money and other personal property of a market value of less 
than $50.00. He must file periodic accounts for approval by the Court. 
Upon the death of the ward, if no probate of the estate is necessary, 
the funeral and last illness expenses may be paid, and, after such 
payment of these expenses and of the fees of the Public Guardian, a 
balance of cash remains in the estate, this may be delivered to the 
heirs at law under Section 630 of the Probate Code or delivered to 
the Public Administrator for administration. 

The Public Guardian program has been in operation for seven years 
The program is beneficial both to the ward and to the county. In all 
cases, the appointment is for both the person and estate. The ward is 
benefited by the personal attention of this office. The county is 
benefited by the payments for hospitalization and for back obligations 
of the ward. Without the Public Guardian program these incompetent 
people would be unable to collect welfare assistance, Social Security, 
and other pensions or benefits to which they are entitled. 

Eases Crowded Hospital Condition 

Where possible and when it appears to be in the best interest 
of the wards, they are moved from the county facilities to private 
rest homes. This provides additional beds at the San Francisco General 
Hospital for patients who are more in need of medical assistance. 



-38- 



Workload Comparison 



1963-6U 


196I+-65 


196 = 


i-66 


1966-67 


1967 


-68 


Actual 


Actual 


Acti 


ial 


Actual 


Estimated 


227 


529 


1. 


,163 


2,lUl 




1,500 


237 


213 




393 


kk6 




550 


37 


U6 




2U7 


152 




200 


5k 


70 




61 


102 




100 



Applications 

Investigated 
Total Wards as 

of June 30 
New Wards during 

Year 
Guardianships 

Terminated 
Expenditures $ 2U,U91 $ 25,312 
Benefits to 

County $^9^,985 $537,387 $761,000 $1,762,000 $2,000,000 
Revenues from 

Fees $ 5,527 $ 8,73^ $ 9,100 $ 18,500 $ 25,000 



91,000 $ 116,000 $ 135,000 



Fees 

The Welfare and Institutions Code provides that upon termination 
of the guardianship, either by death or restoration to competency, the 
Public Guardian may now be awarded fees by the judge of the Superior 
Court on the filing of the final account. The fees for the last fiscal 
year amounted to $18,500.00. These fees are in addition to other 
benefits, both direct and indirect, received through this program. 

Present and Anticip a ted Future Requirements 

As noted, even though the workload has increased, the present 
staff is able to handle the current workload. Due to the physical 
consolidation of the Public Administrator - Public Guardian office, 
the loss of four requested positions did not handicap the operation 
of the office as much as was expected. The utilization of personnel 
formerly assigned only to the respective offices in either program 
has afforded more flexibility to meet fluctuation in the workload of 
each office. 

As reported last year, two situations have increased the work- 
load; namely, (l) the burial of the indigent dead; and (2) the investi- 
gation and burial arrangements of competent persons who die outside of 
the county and who are recipients of welfare benefits. 

At present the San Francisco College of Mortuary Science has a 
contract with the City and County of San Francisco for the removal and 
burial of the indigent dead. Due to the increased number of welfare 
recipients dying outside the county, the determination of indigency, 
especially at nights and on weekends, has become a serious problem. 
The jurisdiction of various County Departments (such as the Department 
of Public Health, the Coroner, and the Public Administrator) in deter- 
mining the indigency of these decedents is in doubt. At joint meetings 
of representatives of these departments, it was concluded on a purely 



-39- 



practical basis that the Public Administrator was in the best position 
to determine indigency and to complete the necessary arrangements when 
the death occurs during the night or weekend hours. At this time there 
is no way to make any reasonable calculation as to the effect on the 
Public Administrator workload in the near future. 

The other situation which affects the workload is the increasing 
practice by the Department of Social Welfare and the County Hospitals 
of placing competent patients in nursing and convalescent homes in 
other counties (AJameda, Contra Costa, Napa, Solano, San Mateo, Marin, 
Sonoma). Since these persons are involuntarily removed, they are 
residents of San Francisco and the other counties will not assume 
liability for their burial. 

At the joint meetings referred to above, a practical working 
arrangement has been initiated whereby the other affected departments 
are supposed to supply the Public Administrator's office with detailed 
information as to these placements and the history and assets of the 
patients . 

Recently the State Department of Mental Hygiene has started to 
release patients from State institutions to boarding and nursing homes 
in the surrounding counties. All persons committed from San Francisco 
revert back to this jurisdiction. 

We are uncertain as to the effect upon our wards of the very 
recent cutbacks in the California Medi-Cal program. If services 
formerly provided by Medi-Cal must be provided by the County facilities, 
we will have serious problems transporting our wards from the various 
counties back to San Francisco. 



-40- 



TAX COLLECTOR 

The Tax Collector operates under several sets of laws, either 
State or Local, as the basic nature of the task to be dene dictates. 
As a County Officer he must observe the directives of the State Revenue 
and Taxation Code in: (a) collecting current and delinquent real and 
personal property taxes, (b) preparing and publishing by June 8 of each 
year a list of delinquent real estate tax payers, (c) making required 
periodic reports to the State Controller and to the local auditor, 
(d) executing deeds to the State of California on properties delinquent 
for five or more years, (e) making provisions to hold public auctions of 
tax-deeded properties and the actual auctions themselves, and (f) making 
refunds on duplicate or erroneous payments. 

As a City Officer he proceeds under the Charter and Ordinances of. 
the City and County in: (a) collecting licenses, (b) operating the 
Bureau of Delinquent Revenue, (c) collecting Parking Keter receipts, 
(d) collecting the Hotel Room Tax, and (e) making the reports and 
settlements required of a local official who collects monies. 

During 1966-67, there was again an appreciable increase in the 
work load of the Tax Collector's Office. The increased activity 
occurred in all eight of the Divisions that comprise the Tax Office. 
These are: Cashier's Division, Real Estate Tax Division, Parking Meter 
Division, Bureau of Delinquent Revenue, Bureau of Licenses, Legal 
Bureau, Hotel Tax Bureau, and Investigators Division. 

Cashier's Division 

During the last fiscal year, the Cashier's Division of the 
Tax Collector's Office collected £215 ,371,792.70, an all-time high for 
the thirteenth consecutive year. 

Feak periods for tax collection were from July 15 to 
September 15 for unsecured personal property taxes, and from 
November 1 to December 15 and March 1 to April 15 for real property 
taxes. leak periods for license collections were in January, July and 
October. 

Following is a table of collections for the various divisions for 
1966-67, as compared with 1965-66. 

1965-66 1966-67 
Real Property Taxes and Secured 

Personal Property Taxes .... £137,259.862.65 31^7, 5l8 ,625.64 

Unsecured Personal Property Taxes 24,329,709.96 31,715,1^9.3^ 

Uniform Sales and Purchase Tax 19,467,321.2? 21 ,048,186.66 

Parking Meters 1,569, 203. 5^ 1,496,361.99 

Delinquent Revenue 1,471,471.24 4,456,670.76 

Licenses 2,492,137-71 2,833,744.29 

Miscellaneous 102,303.45 70,270.3C 

TOTAL $186,692,009.82 '",209, 139, 008. 98 



-41- 



Unsecured Pers. Prop. - 1966 Paid Under Protest $ 6,082,655.^7 
Unsecured Personal Property - 1967 (Abstracts) 32,938.71 

Unsecured Personal Property - 1967 117,189. 5^ 



GRAND TOTAL $215 ,371 ,792. 70 



The $10,000,000 increase in real property taxes is partially due 
to some increased assessments, but mostly because of the tax rate rise 
from $10,168 to $10.61. 

Real Estate Tax Division 

Reconversion to an Electronic Data Processing program has been 
somewhat delayed, due to other E. D. P. schedulings. The July Real 
Estate Rolls, the Mailing Lists, and the November bills are all being 
electronically produced. Programming by the E. D. P. staff is proceed- 
ing, with the ultimate objective of having all tax collection procedures 
and accounts done electronically. Rapidity of accomplishment is, of 
course, contingent upon the amount of attention that can be given by the 
E. D. P. staff to Tax Office matters. 

Due to our implied legal obligation to mail tax bills to an 
address that ha.s been given to the County Recorder, it is imperative 
that E. D. P. help us keep current on new deed recordings. 

Real estate tax delinquencies in San Francisco are still the 
lowest among all major counties in the State. 

The following table shows delinquencies for 1966-67, compared with 
1965-66. 

Real Property Unsecured Property 
Taxes Taxes 

Amount Delinquent June 30, 1967 52,181,828.51 $1,686,155.18 

Amount Delinquent June 30, 1966 2,057,998.95 891,519.33 

Per Cent Delinquent June 30, 1967 1.46 2.59 

Pur Cent Delinquent June 30, 1966 1.48 2.66 

There were 2,737 parcels sold to the State and 12 deeded to the 
State in 1966-67, compared to 3,905 parcels sold to the State and 10 
deeded to the State in the previous fiscal year. 

Uniform Sales and Purchase Tax 

San Francisco's Uniform Sales and Purchase Tax has been collected 
since July 1, 1958, by the State of California as agent for the City and 
County, and the revenues minus collection costs are returned to the City 
and County. 

The figures for this, and last year, are shown previously in this 



-42- 



report. 

Parking Motor Division 

The Parking Motor Division collects, sorts and counts, and pro- 
pares for deposit all coin deposited in 12,823 parking meters in 
San Francisco. Thirteen collectors arc used in the operation, eight 
men in three panel trucks collecting the money and winding the springs 
of about 4,250 meters daily, while five men in the office process the 
coins. Of the 51,371,796 coins handled during the fiscal year 1966-67, 
3^,732,1^0, or 67)^0 were pennies; 10,328,539 or 20%, were nickels and 
6,311,117, or l2 1 /$, were dimes. The total weight of the coins pro- 
cessed during the year was 386,313 pounds, a decrease from the previous 
fiscal year of 17,731 pounds. 

The decrease in weight also reflected a decrease of revenue in 
the amount of $72,842. This loss was due mostly to the construction of 
B.A.R.T. in the Mission District. 

A comparison of yearly parking meter revenue follows: 

1959-60 $1,401,912 1963-64 $1,467,727 

1960-61 1,500,003 1964-65 1,550,903 

1961-62 1,459,558 1965-66 1,569,204 

19.62-63 1,491,368 1966-67 1,496,361 

During the year Canadian and foreign coins were redeemed for 
$1,501.94. An average of more than throe pounds daily of washers and 
slugs , or more than 700 pounds during the year was separated from the 
negotiable coins and disposed of in the bay. 

Bureau of Delinquent Revenue 

A total of 4,353 accounts, other than personal property billings, 
was transferred to the Bureau of Delinquent Revenue by various City and 
County departments during 1966-67. — 

The number of accounts handled represents a continuous increase 
ov^-r those of previous fiscal years. This was accomplished with no in- 
crease in the number of personnel and without a full crew of investiga- 
tors in the field for the entire year. 

As part of the Assessment reform program instituted by Assessor 
Joseph E. Tinney, all collections of personal property payments are 
made by the Tax Collector. In the year 1966-67 the Bureau received and 
accounted for approximately 100,000 such accounts. 

Cost to the City and County for monies collected by the Bureau 
of Delinquent Revenue v/as approximately y/o during the same fiscal year. 

Following is a summary of activities of the Bureau for 1966-67 
showing also a comparison with 1965-66. 



-43- 



1965-66 




1966-67 


J+5,116 




5'+,7V? 


z 978,505.23 


810 


,223,756.20 


1,102 
Z 3^8,371.37 


Z 


9^2 
313,^51.82 


2,189 

Z 7,369.98 


z 


2,518 
7,107.63 


ko 
Z 81,090.78 


z 


17 
85,175.02 


630 

Z 62,593.38 


*> 


673 
537©98.77 


2V7 




203 


Z 1,080.37 


3 


1,^75.76 


49,32^ 




59,100 


81,^79,011.11 


810 


,68^,065.20 



No. Unscc. Prop. Tax Bills 
Collections ,Unsec.Del.Frop. 
Taxes 

No. Pub. Health Dept. Del. Accts. 
Collections , Pub. Health Dept. 

No. Pub. Library Del.Accts. 
Collections, Fublic Library 

No. Sonoma Home Accts, 
Collections, Sonoma Home 

No. Other City 8. Co. Dept. 

Del. Accts. 
Collections, Other Depts. 

No. Interest, Fees, 

Court Costs Accts. 
Collections, Interest, Fees, 
Court Costs 

Total No. Accounts Received 
Total Collections, Delinquent 
Accounts 

As part of collection enforcement procedures, 1,006 court actions 
were instituted in 1966-67. Of this total, 89O were filed in Small 
Claims Court, 111 in the Municipal Court and 5 in the Superior Court. 

Bureau of Licenses 

For the fiscal year 1966-67 the Bureau of Licenses showed an in- 
crease in gross receipts. As an efficiency move, we have endeavored to 
place licenses on an annual, rather than a quarterly basis, wherever 
possible. Following is a breakdown of licenses by type, number and 
amount for 1966-67 compared to 1965-66. 

1965 - 1966 1966 1967 

Number Amount Number ^jnount 

General Business 29,351 8 639,597.91 29,650 Z 709,97^.00 

Vehicles 385 38,899.20 377 ^+0, 112. 75 

Bicycles 3,566 1,783.00 3,399 1,698.50 

Inspection Fees 2,^10 78,156.35 2,361 76,381.83 

Contractors 2,l8*f 22,082.00 2,l6*f 21,800.00 

Miscellaneous 3,868 8,380. 10 ^,076 8,985.50 

Dog 30,801 123,20^.00 30,210 120,836.00 

Duplicate Dog Tags 397 198.50 3^5 172.50 

Curb Painting 18 2,230.50 l8 2,305.65 

Meat 62it 15,539.30 608 19,170.00 

Total (Excluding 

Hotel Room Tax) 73,60*+ £ 930,070.86 73,208 81,001,^36.73 

-Vf- 



1965 1966 1966 1967 

Number Amount Number Amount 

Hotel Room Tax 1,^88 $1,639, 533. 5^ 1,^95 $1,832,298.96 

Grand Total 

License Bureau 75,092 2,569,60^0 7^,703 2,853,735.69 

Hotel Room Tax Sub-Bureau 

Although a separate Budget item, the Hotel Room Tax as shown 
above is collected by the Bureau of Licenses. 

Established by Ordinance July 1, 196l, the Hotel Accounts set up 
by the License Bureau amounted to 1,^95 in 1966-67. This represents 
approximately ^50 active tax-paying hotels. 

Each quarterly amount represents the tax collected by the hotels 
between the dates specified. 

A comparison of collections by quarters follows: 

1965 - 1966 1966 - 1967 

July 1 - September 30 $ 358,901.31 8 ^2,523.53 

October 1 - December 31 ^97 , 882.^ 5^2,79^.9^ 

January 1 - March 31 36^,296.13 ^29,381.89 

April 1 - June 30 3^-0,970.97 ^1 7,598.60 

TOTAL $1,562,050.85 $1,832,298.96 



-<*5- 



V 



1967-68 
Annual Report 



DOCUMENTS 

SEP 24 1968 



£ 



DIRECTOR OF 
FINANCE AND RECORDS 




INCLUDING 

County Clerk Recorder Records Center 

Registrar of Voters Tax Collector 

Records Preservation Officer 



Public Guardian 



Public Administrator 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Agricultural Commissioner Farmers' Market 



CITY AMD COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Director of Finance and Records 

September 3, 1968 

Subject: 1967-68 Annual 
Report 
Honorable Thomas J. Mellon 
Chief Administrative Officer 
City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Mr. Mellon: 

We hereby submit the annual report for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1968, covering the City and County 
departments and offices under the jurisdiction of the 
Director of Finance and Records. 

Subject to your approval, we administer the services 
and activities of the Departments of Finance and Records, 
Weights and Measures, and Agriculture, which include the 
offices of County Clerk, Recorder, Registrar of Voters, 
Public Administrator, Public Guardian, Tax Collector, 
Records Center, Records Preservation Officer, Sealer of 
Weights and Measures, Farmers' Market and Agricultural 
Commissioner. 

Separate reports for each of these offices are included 
herein, together with the statistical data requested by the 
Mayor. Each separate report was prepared by the office 
head concerned. 

Offices which support themselves through fees collected 
for services provided, are the Recorder, Public Administrator, 
and Farmers* Market. The Public Guardian likewise more than 
pays its own way, the benefits realized largely through 
hospital benefits paid in behalf of the wards. 

Very truly yours , 



VIRGIL L. ELLIOTT 
Director 



INDEX 

Letter of Transmittal . 1 

Index 2 

Organization Chart 3 

Records Center k 

Records Preservation Officer . . 6 

County Clerk 9 

Recorder . 15 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 18 

Agricultural Commissioner 21 

Farmers' Market 26 

Registrar of Voters 29 

Public Administrator-Public Guardian . . 31 
Tax Collector 36 



-2- 



ORGANIZATION CHART ~ DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND RECORDS 
City and County of San Francisco, California 



MAYOR AND BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 



LEGAL 



CitT t Dist Attys 



PROPERTY 



Real Estate Dept. 



FISCAL 



Controller, Tres. 



PERSONNEL 



Civil Service 



CHIEF 
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



Thomas J. Mellon 

I 



DIRECTOR'S OFFICE 




DIRECTOR 

of 

FINANCE AND RECORDS 


2 employees 








Virgil L. Elliott 



EMPLOYEE WELFARE 



Ret. Sye., H.S.S. 



SUPPLY 



Purchasing Dept. 



MAIN.^ REPAIR 



Pub. Works Dept. 



REGISTRAR 
OF VOTERS 



Basil Healey 



Register San Francisco 
voters; conouct elec- 
tions, INCLUDING EM- 
PLOYEE E LECT I ONS ; 
MA I NTA IN VOTING MA - 
CHINES. 



24 employees 



6-30-68 



COUNTY CLERK, 
RECORDER 



Martin Mongan 



KEEP RECORDS OF Tl 

Super i or Court; 
issue marr i age li 
censes. provide 
courtroom clerks ; 
record and index 
ocume nts . 



employees 



AGRICULTURAL 
COMMISSIONER 



R. L. Bozzini 



I NSPECTS FRUITS, VEG 
[TABLES, NUTS, POUL • 

TRY, EGGS , HONE Y , 
NURSER*. PEST CONTROL 
a seed; INSPECT FOR 

PLANT OUARANTINE AND 
EXPORT CERTIFICATES. 



9 employees 



TAX 




PUBLIC ADHTN., 


COLLECTOR 




PUBLIC GUARDIAN 


Londo Casassa 


Con S. Shea 


COLLE CT AD VALOREM 


AOMI N 1 STER ESTATES! 


AND UNSECURED TAXES, 




SERVES AS PUBLIC 


PARKING METER RE- 




Guard 1 an . 


CEIPTS, ISSUE BUSI- 






NESS LI CENSES , RE - 






C E 1 VE PURCHAS E AND 






USE TAX RECEIPTS. 






COLLECT HOTEL TAX 






67 employees 


27 employees 







RECORDS 
CENTER 


Wm. Satterfield 


3 employees 






FARMERS' 
MARKET 


P. J.O'Connell 


3 employees 



SEALER OF 
WTS. & MEASURES 



O.C. Skinner. Jr. 



Test weighing ano 
measuring devices 
inspect packaged 
c0mm00 i t i es . 



9 employees 



RECORDS CENTER 

1967-68 

The Records Center was established 17 years ago by ordinance of 
the Board of Supervisors. This ordinance, now comprising Chapter 8 of 
the San Francisco Administrative Code, authorizes the Chief Administrative 
Officer to establish, maintain and operate within a department under 
his jurisdiction a Records Center for the "orderly storage, care, manage- 
ment and safeguarding of storage records of the departments and offices 
of the City and County and of the San Francisco Unified School District." 
The Chief Administrative officer has delegated to the Director of Finance 
and Records the authority to administer the operations and personnel of 
the Records Center. Two Clerks and a Principal Clerk comprise the Center's 
staff. 

Under provisions of the Administrative Code, services of the 
Records Center are provided without charge, including storage boxes, 
transportation of boxes and reference services. Paper records are stored 
at 144 Townsend and 930 Bryant Streets, and at the old Municipal Railway 
streetcar barn, Geary Boulevard and Masonic Avenue. 

Microfilm Records Stored Underground 

Microfilm records are stored in the underground vault beneath the 
Municipal Railway's Forest Hill Station. Most microfilm images are on 
100-foot, 16-mm. reels and placed in cartons 2" x 4" x 1" in size. These 
cartons are stored in fireproof metal safes which have combination locks. 
Double fireproof doors protect against unauthorized entry to the vault 
room, wherein temperature and humidity controls have been provided. 

Following is a 5-y ea r comparison of factors involving operation of 
the Records Center: 

1963-64 64-65 63-66 66-67 67- 

Records in storage(cu. ft.) 

Records received, indexed 

Disposal of Useless Records 

References to Records 

Expenditures 

Cost per cubic foot 

It would be highly desirable to consolidate the paper record 
storage locations. Additional time for Records Center personnel is 
required to commute between these locations, via public transit, in order 
to "pull" and re file records requested by departments. Reference records 
are delivered twice daily to the departments, and returned, again via public 
transit. 



31,686 32,266 


35,317 


37,755 


38,220 


4,799 1,319 


5,224 


3,217 


2,060 


j 832 677 


2,173 


-0- 


1,595 


21,981 28,218 


27,222 


23,024 


21,342 


$33,523 $32,232 


$34,067 


$32,522 


$31,262 


$1.06 $1.02 


$.96 


$.86 


$.82 



A breakdown of records in storage as of June 30, 1968, is shown on 
the next page. 



-k- 



RECORDS IN STORAGE AS OF JUNE 30, 19 6 8 



DEPARTMENT 



MICROFILM PAPER RECORDS 1966-67 
(100' Reels) (Cubic Feet) References 



Adult Probation ....... 

Art ..... 

Assessor .......... 

Board of Permit Appeals . . . 
Board of Supervisors .... 

Calif. Palace Legion of Honor 
Chief Administrative Officer 
City Attorney ........ 

City Planning ........ 

Civil Service 

Controller 

DeYoung Museum ....... 

District Attorney .«»».♦ 
Electricity ......... 

Fair Employment ....... 

Finance and Records: 

County Clerk (Superior Court) 

Recorder ......... 

Registrar of Voters .... 

Public Administrator .... 

Tax Collector ....... 

Weights and Measures .... 

Law Library ......... 

Mayor ............ 

Municipal Court ....... 

Public 'Defender ....... 

Public Health: 

Child Psychiatric Clinic . . 

Crippled Children's Services 

City Clinic ....... 

Laguna Honda .,«,,.,. 

Other Health Services . . . 

S.F, General Hospital . . . 
Public Utilities: 

Airport ...„,,..... 

Bur. of Light, Heat and Power 

General Office P.U.C. . . . 

Hetch Hetchy 

Municipal Railway 

Utilities Engineering Bureau 

Water .......... 

D ublic Welfare ....... 

D ublic Works: 

Army Street Office ..... 

Engineering Office . ♦ , . . 

Main Office »...»... 

Sewer Repair Division . . . 

'urchasing ......... 

leal Estate ......... 

:ecreation and Park ..... 

etirement System •••«.. 

chools ........... 

heriff ........... 

uperior Court (Sec'y Records) 

outh Guidance Center .... 
TOTALS «... 

-5- 







268 


35 






16 




38.5 




182 
11 


10 


70.0 




450 


29 


.3 






2 






6 


2 






829 


104 


39.5 




110 


49 


7.8 


1 


,313 


253 


17.6 


5 


,947 


195 


.8 






1 



3.3 



26 



55.5 


14,643 


15 


,357 


3,836.0 


379 




21 




49 




1 




422 




21 


7.8 


1,704 

4 




531 


6.0 


12 






55,0 


3,012 


3 


,032 




50 




4 




168 




17 




148 




255 




318 


1 


,028 




295 




35 


15,0 


222 




4 




1,918 




110 


1.5 








2.5 


97 




3 




100 




2 


15.0 


337 




36 


3.5 








525.0 






2 


74.0 


29 




2 




638 




3 




173 




2 


55.8 


41 
3 




2 




1,204 




70 




105 




9 


6.5 








8.5 


1,283 




2 


1,064.5 








3.8 


1,461 




91 


2.3 










243 


21 


918 


5;916.0 


,342 



RECORDS PRESERVATION OFFICER 

1967-68 

Administrative Code Sections 8.9 through 8.11 specify that the 
"public interest demands that various City and County records which 
would be essential to the continuity of government and the protection of 
rights and interest of individuals in event of a major disaster be 
preserved against possible destruction by fire, earthquake, flood, 
enemy attack or other cause." 

This ordinance names the Chief Administrative Officer, or the 
head of any department under his jurisdiction as designated by him, to 
serve as Records Preservation Officer. The Chief Administrative Officer 
delegated this duty to the Director of Finance and Records. 

Under provisions of the ordinance, the Records Preservation 
Officer "shall recommend to the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors a 
program for the selection and preservation of essential City and County 
records, shall advise and assist in its establishment and maintenance, 
and shall recommend the place and manner of safekeeping of essential 
records and preservation of duplicates." 

Annual Survey is Submitted 

The Records Preservation Officer is required to submit annually 
to the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors a report containing recommenda- 
tions as to which City and County records should be designated as essential 
and preserved against a major disaster. In addition, he is required to 
report "on the status and progress of the records preservation program, 
together with recommendations for making such revisions as deemed necessary 
to keep the inventory of essential records current, accurate and complete." 

The latest such report submitted December *f, 196?, classified 
20,528,600 pages of City and County records as essential within the meaning 
of Administrative Code Sections 8.9-8.11. Of this total, 9,591,900 pages 
had been safeguarded by a preservation copy, either on microfilm, paper, 
by dispersal, or in a fireproof office vault. 

Assistance Available to Departments 

The Records Preservation Officer will assist in every way possible 
in the developing of records preservation program. Funds required for 
such activities may be requested by the various departments, offices, 
boards and commissions through the usual budgetary channels. 

The latest "Inventory of Records Designated as Essential" follows 
on the next page. 



-6- 



apartment 
)ULT PROB. 

:rport 

IT COMM. 

1SESSOR 

). OF EDUCATION 

). OF SUPS. 

A.O. 

TY ATTORNEY 

TY PLANNING 

VIL SERVICE 

NTROLLER 

UNTY CLERK 

i YOUNG MUSEUM 

;ectricity 

RE DEPT. 
[ALTH SER. SYS. 
USING APPEALS 
USING AUTHORITY 
[ 1. PROBATION 
.HON OF HONOR 
UICIPAL COURT 



INVENTORY OF RECORDS DESIGNATED AS ESSENTIAL 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

(as of December 4, 196?) 



Essential 

Records 

(Type) 

Minutes 

Leases 

Minutes 

Assessment Files 

Minutes, etc. 

Ords. & Resolutions 
Journals 

P. & A. Contracts 

Rulings 

Minutes, Maps 

Minutes, Personnel 

Fiscal, Payroll 

Judgments 
Indexes 

Registers 

Minutes, Inventory 

Cable Maps 

Minutes, Maps 

Membership Records 

Minutes 

Minutes, Leases 

Minutes 

Minutes, Inventory 

Registers 

Indexes, Min. Books 



Essential 

Records 

(Pages) 


Safeguarded 

by 

Preservation 
copies (Pages) 


Preservation 
Method in 
Use or 
Recommended 


, 5,200 


2,000 


Office Vault 


4,250 


1,000 


Office Vault 


6,000 


1,000 


Office Vault 


900,000 


10,000 


Office Vault 


550,000 


520,000 


Microfilm 


125,000 
205,000 


115,000 
200,000 


Microfilm 
Office Vault 


1,000 





Office Vault 


35,500 





Dispersal 


30,000 


25,000 


Office Vault 


200,000 


10,000 


Office Vault 


600,000 


100,000 


Microfilm 


3,600,000 
95,500 

557,200 


280,000 





Microfilm 
Microfilm 
Microfilm 


80,000 


3,000 


Office Vault 


1,000 


1,000 


Microfilm 


15,400 


15,400 


Office Vault 


60,000 


10,000 


Office Vault 


3,000 


1,000 


Office Vault 


80,000 


5,000 


Office Vault 


4,000 


1,000 


Office Vault 


45,000 


5,000 


Office Vault 


925,000 
875,000 






Microfilm 

Microfilm 



partment 


Essential 

Records 

(Type) 


Essential 

Records 

(Pages) 


Safeguarded 

by 

Preservation 
copies (Pages) 


Preservation 
Method in 
Use or 
Recommended 


NI. RAILWAY 


Misc. Records 




7,500 


3,500 


Office Vault 


RKING AUTH. 


Auth. Minutes 




54,00^ 


5,000 


Office Vault 


LICE DEPT. 


Commission Minutes 




72,000 


10,000 


Office Vault 


BLIC ADMIN. 


Active Case Records 




8,000 


8,000 


Office Vault 


BLIC HEALTH 


Birth Records 
Death Records 
Other 
Disinterments 


1 
1 


,880,000 
,630,000 

100,000 

60,000 


1,880,000 

1,630,000 

15,000 

60,000 


Dispersal 
Dispersal 
Microfilm 
Microfilm 


BLIC LIBRARY 


Commission Minutes 




3,200 





Office Vault 


BLIC WORKS 


DPW Minutes 
Engineering Records 
Sewer Main Maps 
Other Maps 




280,000 

75,000 
1,000 
1,000 



40,000 

500 
500 


Office Vault 
Microfilm 
Microfilm 
Microfilm 


U.C. 


Minutes 




46,000 





Office Vault 


RCHASER 


Contracts 
Equipment Inventory 




3,000 

18,000 






Office Vault 
Office Vault 


AL ESTATE 


Property Records 




60,000 


5,000 


Office Vault 


CORDER 


Property Records 
Marriage Licenses 


5 


,080,000 
463,000 


3,550,000 

463,000 


Microfilm 
Dispersal 


C.-PARK 


Commission Minutes 




5,150 


3,000 


Office Vault 


DEVELOPMENT 


Minutes, Contracts 




10,100 


1,000 


Office Vault 


riREM'T SYS. 


Membership Records 




956,000 





Microfilm 


ERIFF 


Inmate Records 




9,000 


4,000 


Office Vault 


3.B. (PUC) 


Engineering Records 




560,000 


525,000 


Microfilm 


9 MEMORIAL 


Minutes 




21,200 


2,000 


Office Vault 


CER DEPT. 


Customer Records 




104,000 


75,000 


Office Vault 


".JARE 


Minutes 




18 ,400 


6,000 


Office Vault 




TOTALS 


20 


,528,600 


9,591,900 








11.719 


12,282 


12,399 


4,304 


3.796 


3,807 


2,451 


2,767 


3.158 


2,833 


3,141 


3,456 


1,800 


1.332 


814 


271 


202 


280 


7,629 


7,713 


7,917 



C0U1JTY CLERK 
1967-68 



The County Clerk's Office serves as the ministerial arm and office 
of record of the Superior Court of the City and Cov.nty of San Francisco. 
In addition, certain statutory indices are maintained, the principal ones 
being the Corporation index, the Partnerships and Fictitious l ; anes Index, 
and the index of Notaries Public. Carriage licenses are issued by this 
department. Branch offices arc looted at the Hall of Justice, the fouth 
Guidance Center, and at San Francisco General Hospital. 

3 Year Summary Comparison 1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 

Superior Court Proceedings: 
Civil actions and petitions 
Probate petitions 
Criminal actions 
Juv. petns. no. of children 
Psychiatric petitions 
Appeals to Superior Court 
xiarriage licenses issued 

Detailed operations of the various divisions of the County Clerk's 
OJfice are shown below: 

Cashier's Division 

The revenue from fees collected in l>67-68 was ,,277,213. A 
c jmparative statement of fee revenue follows: 

1965-66 196S-67 1967-68 

Probate Department 
General Department 
Civil Department 
Carriage License Dept. * 
Professional Registrations 

Total Of lice Fees $277,077 £274,384 $277,218 

* Marriage License and Professional Registration Fees 
are now collected by the Recorder's Office. 

Fines, Law Library Fees and 

Collections for Other Departments : 1965-66 I966-67 1967-68 

Juvenile Court Fines 
Juvenile Court Traffic Fines 
Crim. Dept. Fines Sc Forfeitures 
Peace Officers Training Fund 
Payments to State Dept. of Pub. Health 

(sec. 26859 Govt. Code) 
Law Library Fees 68,241 68,436 76,661 



-9- 



$ 91,426 


$ 87,098 


$ 83,655 


127,046 


129,897 


132,669 


50,540 


49,272 


52,597 


7,629 


7,713 


7,917 


436 


404 


380 



v 100 


v 475 


. 


12,353 


12,161 


^12,741 


57,360 


81,271 


47,717 


5,344 


7,929 


6,478 


3,633 


5,586 


4,396 



CASHIii'3 )IVI3I0N (Continued) 

Fines, Law Library Fees and 

Collections for Other Departments : 1965-66 i;66-6? 19^7-63 

Sup. Ct. Reporters Salary Fund S223.644 ,,22?, 156 $234,201 
Total Fees and Fines Collected $645, 3C 7 #$77,398 £659,412 

Trust Fund Deposits: 
Civil Court Deposits & Jury Fees 1,525,354 1,141,025 1,748,044 
Criminal Bail Deposits, Cash & 3onds 57,200 16,562 40,036 

Total uoney Collected $2,230,861 Si, 834, 985 .^2, 447, 492 

GENIAL DIVISION 

New Civil actions filed iuring the past fiscal year totaled 12,399 
compared with 12,282 in 1966-67. A breakdown of other filings follows: 

1965-66 1966-67 19^7-1 

Civil Actions 11,719 

Adoptions 342 

Certificates of Incorporation 850 
Cts.of Copartnership & Fie. Names 1,110 
Official and Notarial Bonds 1,168 
Oaths of Office l,6l6 

The following is a classification by character of civil actions filed. 

1965-66 1966-67 1967-6E 

♦Personal Injury Cases 

By Aotor Vehicles 
Others 
Divorce 
Annulment 

Separate Maintenance 
**A11 Other ..ctions 

Totals 11,?19 12,282 12,399 

* First Reporting 
** Adjusted Figures to Compens-te for Change in Reporting. 

CIVIL DIVISION 

1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 
Disposition of Civil Actions: 

Judgts. by Jury on Verdict 368 331 315 

Judgts. i-e.se, after Ct. Hearings 2,568 4,262 4,352 

Judgts. on Default 106 123 66 

Dismissals by Parties 3,367 3,844 4,060 

-10- 



12,282 


12,399 


354 


445 


330 


811 


942 


894 


1,120 


1,043 


1,664 


550 







2,559 


- 


- 


1,634 


3,006 


3,183 


3,278 


440 


440 


513 


178 


181 


227 


**8,095 


**8,478 


4,183 



232 


280 


287 


23 


25 


27 


383 


377 


393 


2,243 


2,386 


2,740 


2,455 


2,323 


2,155 



CIVIL DIVISION (Continued) 

1965-66 1966-67 ly 67-68 

Disposition of Civil Actions: 
Trsfrd. to other Jurisdictions 
Sep. Maint. Judgts. Grtd. 
Annulments of ikrriage Grtd. 
Interloc. Decrees of Div. Grtd. 
Final Decrees of Div. Grtd. 

Appeals to District and Supreme 

Courts from Superior Court 291 298 326 

Appeals Disposed of: 
Affirmed 
ilodified 
Reversed 
Dismissed 

PR03ATE DIVISION 

New Estate and guardianship proceedings totaled 3,307 compared with 
3,896 for the previous fiscal year. 

1965-66 1966-67 1367-63 



53 


34 


40 


8 


3 


3 


28 


15 


31 


41 


48 


53 



Probate Proceedings Filed: 








Testate 


2,202 


2,035 


2,028 


Intestate 


1,222 


1,135 


1,091 


iiissing Persons 


6 


3 


4 


Guardianship Proceedings Filed: 








jlinor 


187 


166 


205 


Incompetent 


477 


340 


272 


Conservator 


210 


217 


207 


Letters Issued: 








Testamentary 


1,966 


1,730 


1,779 


.administration 


389 


888 


780 


Administration with .all Annexed 


265 


320 


289 


Special 


155 


167 


163 


Guardianship 


644 


510 


428 


Conservator 


230 


251 


229 



CRIMINAL DIVISION 

Four Courts heir criminal matters daily at the Sail of Justice. 
Statistics below are based on number of defendants: 

1965-66 1966-67 1967-^ 



New Actions Filed: 2,451 2,767 3.153 

Informations 1,929 2,182 2,417 



-11- 



CRIMINAL DIVISION (Continued) 
1965-66 1966-67 



l>-67- 



New Actions Filed, (Cont'd) 
Indictments 

Cert, from iluni. Ct. for Jud^t. 
Cert, from iiuni. Ct. for Hearing on 

Sexual Psychopathy 
Pets, for Cert, of ieha.:ilitation 
Cert, from liuni. Ct. for Hearing on 

Present Sanity 
Cert, from iluni. Ct. to Determine 

Narcotic Addiction 
Petitions for ./rits of Habeas Corpus 

Disposition of Cases: 
Convicted after Pleas of }!olo 

Contendere 
Convicted after Pleas of Guilty 
Convicted after Court Trials 
Convicted after Jury Trials 
Dismissed 

Transferred to other Jurisdictions 
Acquitted after Court Trials 
Ac fitted after Jury Trials 
Sentenced to County Jail 
Sentenced to State Prison 
Sentenced by Fines 
Committed to Youth Authority 
Committed as Sexual Psychopaths 
Committed as Insane 
Prob. Grtd. , incl. Conditional Prob. 
Certs, of Rehabilitation Granted 
Committed re: Narcotic addiction 

Fines and Bail Forfeitures Collected: 
Fines and .assessments 
Bail Forfeitures 

Appeals to State Appellate Court: 
Pending at Beginning of Year 
Filed During the Year 

Disposition of Appeals: 
Affirmed 
Reversed 
Dismissed 
Pending 
Modified 

Coroner's Tr.-nscripts Filed 



340 
29 


354 

43 


13 

6 


6 
3 


126 


100 


8 

is 65 


6 
73 



20 


44 


1.410 


1,451 


321 


313 


84 


116 


320 


359 


9 


20 


145 


123 


33 


28 


309 


234 


228 


241 


4 


6 


69 


61 


9 


10 


74 


61 


1.043 


1,207 


6 


4 


110 


119 


£45,329 


£51.303 


16,226 


39.600 


123 


128 


105 


148 


42 


56 


12 


6 


42 


50 


128 


158 


4 


6 



384 



186 



354 
23 

8 
9 

205 

17 
128 



27 

1,898 
305 
124 
378 

35 
168 

21 

142 

272 

5 

92 

15 
100 

1,636 

9 
103 



£43,098 
29.351 



158 
121 



57 

8 

60 

150 

4 

369 



-12- 



JuVi^ xJL COl .T 31/1,10/ 

The Juvenile Ctjurt meets every Jay at the louth Guidance Center, 

375 Woodside ^venue, San Francisco. Statistics follow: 

1965-66 1966-67 1967-63 



462 383 

733 591 

2,358 2,865 

2,358 2,865 

1,060 1,370 

2,753 2,784 

3^3 210 

46 47 

Number of records sealed 106 119 209 

Juvenile Traffic Hearings: 

ibving violations 4,531 5,074 5.658 

Fines Collected $12,594 A2.031 $12,185 

STATE HOSPITAL COUHT DIVISION 

The State Hospital Court meets at 2:0C ?.... every week day at San 
Francisco General Hospital, 2450 Tvjenty- second Street. The Court Clerk is 
in attendance from 8 A.M. to 5 P.M. honday through Friday. 

1965-66 1966-67 1967-1: 



Petitions Filed: 




Ptns. for Com"i. of Dependent 




Children 


482 


Number of Children 


825 


Ptns. Filed on Delinquent 




Children 


2,008 


.''umber of Children 


2,008 


Suppl. ptns. Filed on Delinquent 




and Dependent Children 


1,332 


Hearings by the Court: 




Detention 


2,798 


Special 


564 


Abandonments 


11 



Alleged Insane Persons: 








Examinations 


1,438 


1,130 


680 


Committed to State Hospitals 


812 


221 


122 


Examined and Discharged 


626 


909 


558 


Intemperance and Use of Drugs: 








Examinations 


313 


179 


127 


Committed to State Hospitals 


195 


13 


6 


Examined and Discharged 


118 


166 


121 


Feeble i'linded: 








Examinations 


49 


23 


7 


Comm. to Homes for Feeble iiinded 


49 


22 


7 



-13- 



APPELLATE DIVISION 

Three judges of the San Francis -o Superior Court, appointed by the 
Judicial Council, sit each Friday morning as the Appellate Department of 
the Superior Court. Appeals from the Municipal Court, Criminal end Civil, 
are heard by the Appellate Division, appeals from the Small Claims Court 
are retried from the beginning. 

1965-66 l-;-66-67 1967-68 

Civil Appe-ls fror.i Muni Court 
Filed During the Year: 56 54 91 

Disposition of Appeals: 
Affirmed 
Modified 

Reversed 
Dismissed 

Rehearings Denied 

Under Submission or Pending 

Criminal Appeals from Muni Court 
Filed During the Tear: 157 102 137 

Disposition of Appeals: 
/if firmed 
Reversed 
Dismissed 
Pending 
I Modified 
Abandoned 

Appeals from Snail Claims Court 58 54 52 



30 


32 


53 


1 








11 


9 


26 


14 


13 


19 


7 


4 


10 


13 


16 


26 



50 


16 


72 


8 


2 


3 


83 


75 


45 


15 


8 


21 











l 


1 


4 



Jisposition of Small Claims Apoeals 








Affirmed 


28 


38 


42 


Reversed 


19 


12 


2 


Dismissed 


9 


4 


7 


Under Submission or Pending 


9 


9 


5 



LICE SE DIVISION 

Ilarriage Licenses issued in 1967-68 totaled 7,917, 204 more than 
the previous fiscal year. There were 2,155 decrees of divorce entered, 
or 168 less than in 1966-67. 

1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 

Ilarriage Licenses Issued 7,629 7,713 7.917 

Professional Registrations 218 202 190 



-14- 



RECOIiDER 
1967-68 

The Recorder's Office, as required by law, receives for recording 
all papers or notices that may legally be recorded, makes an! keeps a 
true copy of the original, indexes the same, ind arranges the books of 
record and indices in suitable places to facilitate tneir inspection. 

A program for microfilming old records dating back to the 1906 
fire was started in 1960-61. Funds to continue this project were 
appropriated each ye?r since that time, and 1,629 old record books 
were microfilmed in 1967-63. 

In December 1;67, our Chief Cleric, Eugene Callaghan, died. e 
have felt his loss keenly, both from a personal standpoint and, because 
of the personnel adjustments which were necessary to replace a man with 
so much experience and ability. 

Breakdown of receipts follows: 

Receipts 

1965-66 1966-67 1967-63 

Recording fees y209.340.20 $153,324.00 ^159,659.20 

Special Service fees 13,571.90 12,497.25 11,612.40 

Marriage certificate recording 

fees 7,623.00 7,812.00 31,668.00 

Real Property Transfer Tax . . - - 203,266.35 

TOT.iS $231,040.10 $174,133.25 $411,206.45 

The increase in marriage certificate fees is not due to any great 
increase in the number of certificates recorded. The fee now includes 
an additional v3 for each certificate, which is credited to a property 
tax reduction fund. 

Expenditures 

1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 

Salaries $177,119.30 $179. 785.56 $179,157.90 

Other 14,345.37 24,838.45 19.200.00 

$191,465.67 $204,624.01 *193, 357.90 

Excess, receipts over expenditures^, 574.43 -$30,490.76 $212,348.55 

Receipts listed do not include desk rental fees collected last 
fiscal year by the Real Estate Department for desk space in the Recorder's 
office used by title companies, record searchers, etc. Neither do they 
include $14,310.70 estimated work for 3,659 papers (6,130 pages) of 



-15- 



"official" or free recordings; that is, the service rendered to war 
veterans, dependents of war veterans, compensation ani pension claims, 
old age pension clairas and miscellaneous Federal, State or other- 
political subJivision recordings; which service is required by State 
law to be performed without fees. 

An additional $250 could be added Tor other free work performed 
as a courtesy to other City and County departments. 

The monthly breakdown of recording and filing fees follows: 

1965-66 196 6-67 1967-63 



July . . . 








$21, 97?. 70 


914,285.15 


*16,^33.50 


.ugust . . 








20,349.70 


15,423.50 


19.329.25 


September 








18,299.30 


13,131.95 


15.122.20 


October 








20,203.20 


13.541.55 


16,394.95 


November . 








19,327.25 


12,906.15 


17,357.30 


December . 








20,861.30 


13,449.90 


16,733.95 


January . 








13,609.30 


12,955.35 


16,262.65 


February . 








17,^02.45 


13,253.20 


15,403.55 


March 








21,521.70 


17,268.90 


17,692.10 


April 








18,871.75 


14,796.95 


17,705.00 


May 








16,251.40 


16,143.50 


17.833.15 


June 








16,363.05 
$231,0 '40. 10 


16,967.15 
$174,133.25 


16,167.00 
$202,939.60 



Beginning January 1, 1968, the Recorder's office assumed its new 
duties of collecting the Real Projcrty Transfer Tax imposed upon transfers 
of real property in Sjn Francisco oy Ordinance No. 315-67. Collections 
for the first six months of 19'68 indicate that this new tax will mean 
added revenue of about $400,000 per year. The monthly break iown of Real 
Property Transfer Tax Receipts follows; 



January 1968 

Febru-ry 

March 

April 

May 

June 



6 MONTHS TOTAL 



$68,483.25 
13,524.55 
43,640.85 
47,881.35 
15,415.95 
14,320.90 

$203,266.35 



-16- 



Documents Filed and Recorded 



The following are the principal classifications of the 80,156 
documents filed and recorded during 1967-63. For comparative purposes, 
lists for two preceding fiscal years are included: 



1965-66 

Affidavits of death 1,268 

Agreements 279 

Decrees 1,063 

Deeds 14,377 

Deeds of trust 17,406 

Judgments and abstracts .... 2,S'6l 

Miscellaneous 36,779 

ililitary Discharges 432 

Uniform Com. Code Filings . . . 7,275 
Mortgages of Real Property . . . 4l6 
Notices of Default .'. . . . . .1,531 

Reconveyances 16,204 

Tax Liens - Federal 1,149 

101,640 



1966-67 

1,286 

279 

859 

11,210 

10,303 

3,578 

31,383 

348 

6,637 

303 

1,574 

9,405 

1,520 

78,685 



The figures below show recordings of deeds, mortgages, 
trust for the past 10 years: 



1967-68 

1,363 

133 

907 

11,363 

11,411 

3,358 

30,691 

331 

6,771 

321 

1.292 

10,194 

1,521 

80,156 
md deeds of 



Fiscal Ye r 

1958-59 
1959-60 
1960-61 
1961-62 
1962-63 
1963-64 
1964-65 
1965-66 
1966-67 
1967-68 



Deeds 

18,308 
17,350 
17.147 
13,680 
19,707 
18,379 
13,390 
14,377 
11,210 
11,863 



+Iortg;ai5;es 

807 
663 
525 
548 
586 
552 
467 
416 
303 
321 



Deeds of Trust 

17.097 
16,791 

18,710 
21,942 

24,175 
22,404 
22,565 
17,406 
10,303 
11,411 



The following table lists the number of marriages performed in San 
Francisco since 1948-49: 



1948-49 
1949-50 
1950-51 
1951-52 
1952-53 
1953-54 
1954-55 
1955-56 
1956-57 
1957-58 



8,465 
7,397 
8,195 
7,220 
7,359 
6,711 
6,686 
6,526 
6.895 
6,502 



1953-59 . . 


6,595 


1959-60 . . 


6,629 


1960-61 . . 


6,538 


1961-62 . . 


6,602 


1962-63 . . 


6,786 


1963-64 . . 


7.215 


1964-65 . . 


7.160 


1965-66 . . 


7,377 


1966-67 . . 


7,793 


1967-68 . . 


7.337 



-17- 



ANNUAL REPORT 

DEPARTMENT 0? WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Fiscal Year 1967-68 



The many duties of the Department of v.'eights & 
Measures in San Francisco are performed by six Inspectors ? 
one Senior Inspector, the Sealer of Weights & Measures, 
and one Senior Clerk Typist, with offices located in the 
City Hall. This Department-is charged with the responsi- 
bility of enforcing State laws and regulations involving 
weight, measure, quantity declarations, yardage and mileage 
meters, Public Weighmasters , anti-freeze and brake fluid, 
advertising and other allied products and services. 

The Department of Weights & Measures has not sought 
to build a record of prosecutions. Rather, it has brought 
about corrections of violations, quite successfully, 
through the education of manufacturers and distributors 
in the requirements of law and their responsibilities 
thereunder, and by persuasion, warnings and hearings. When 
such measures fail, prosecutions must follow. 

This office has participated very heavily in the 
new "Fair Packaging & Labeling Act", by conducting 
surveys of package sizes of commodities such as soaps and 
detergents, tooth paste and potato chips. This new law 
is aimed at controlling the profusion of packages some- 
times confusing to the shopper. Some big packages 
actually hold less than smaller ones. "Big Gallon", "King 
Size", "Jumbo Size", "Economy Size", and other such 
designations are vague, confusing and meaningless. Too 
many packages have excess air space and are slack filled. 
Quantity declarations have, in many instances, been 
obscure. All of this adds up to the assumption that some 
modern merchandisers have served the consumer a large 
plate of "scrambled eggs". It is the purpose of this 
Act to give us the authority to accomplish an "unscram bli ng!' 

Under the "Fair Packaging & Labeling Act", the 
National Bureau of Standards is responsible for determining 
if the package sizes in which a commodity is offered for 
sale has proliferated to the extent that consumers have 
trouble making comparisons and value judgements. If 
this is not accomplished voluntarily, the information 
assembled by local authorities is then used to determine 
the need for legislation. 



-18- 



The basic philosophy of all official Weights and 
Measures functions is "that equity may prevail". A large 
part of the value resulting from the work of Weights 
and. Measures inspection is intangible in that it 
consists of the prevention of short weight and measure 
and of faulty or dishonest practices. As the scales 
at the retail level become relatively less important 
because of their less frequent use in serving customers 
directly, the consistent checking of prepackaged 
merchandise becomes more important and merits a larger 
share of our time and efforts. The true function of 
our inspections is to safeguard the interests of all 
who either buy or sell. We are as quick to reject a 
piece of weighing equipment that is in error against 
the merchant as we are to refuse approval when the 
customer's rights are jeopardized. 

Our particular responsibility is to protect 
those who cannot protect themselves. It goes without 
saying that no citizen has a kit of accurate weights 
that he could take into a market, check the scales and 
make certain of their accuracy. This is a function of 
Government. Nor does a citizen have 100 to 1000# 
standards to be able to check heavy capacity scales, 
or a five gallon test measure to check the accuracy of 
gasoline pumps. He relies on Government to make these 
determinations and accepts the seal that we plac on 
the instrument as evidence of its accuracy. 

These important functions are performed by San 
Francisco's Weights and Measures Department, in 
cooperation with State and Federal authorities, with 
the end result of prot ,cting the economic welfare of 
every citizen by making mandatory the use of only 
honest Weights and Measure standards and honest 
merchandizing practices to produce correct determina- 
tions in every commercial weight or measure transaction. 

We beli2ve that in San Francisco we have faith- 
fully achieved this purpose. 



-19- 



There were 53 complaints received and adjusted in 
1967-68 by our Inspectors and 23 "Orders to Conform" 
were issued. A total of 1,124,927 packages was inspected, 
of which 12,506 were found to be "Short Weight." 



Type 


Sealed 


Adjusted 


Condemned 


Confisc'd 


Scales: 














Counter 


2,088 




327 




133 


5 


Spring 


2,534 




280 




30 


2 


Computing 


6,343 




529 




106 


2 


Heavy Capacity 


2,723 




584 




199 


7 


Person weighers 


181 




46 




49 


1 


Prescription (Drugs) 


281 




4 




1 





Weights: 














Drug 


8,749 












25 


Commercial 


12,035 




208 







35 


Measures: 














Retail Pumps 


5,055 




42 




340 





Grease Meters ) 
Lube Oil Meters) 


531 









13 





Yardage Meters 


108 















Liquid Measures 


2,010 















Wholesale Meters 


22 




3 




6 





Taximeters 


59 




5 




41 





COMPARISON OF WORKLOAD FACTORS 


1965-66 


1966-67 








1967-68 


Certificates Issued 




14 


,469 


14, 


,185 


15,261 


Scales Tested 




15 


,134 


19. 


,719 


16,455 


Weights Inspected 




23 


,167 


25. 


,460 


21,052 


Gas Pumps Inspected 




5 


,285 


5. 


,356 


5,437 


Other Measuring Devices 


2 


,641 


4, 


,218 


2,798 


Containers Inspected 


2 


,059 


,899 


1,657. 


,353 1024,927 


Miscellaneous Calls 




l 


,827 


2, 


,000 


1,570 



-20- 



COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
AGRICULTURAL COMMISSIONER 

ANNUAL REPORT 
1967 - 1968 

The San Francisco County Department of Agriculture is a branch of the City 
nd County government. It is responsible for the enforcement of all State laws, 
•ules and regulations pertaining to the office of the County Agricultural Commis- 
sioner and such other work as is prescribed by the Chief Administrative Officer, 

The general purpose and responsibilities of this department include the fol- 
.owing : 

To promote and protect the agricultural industry. 

To protect and benefit both the grower and the consumer by enforcing 
the provisions of the Agricultural Code. 

Within the authority delegated to us, to promote and protect the health 
and welfare of our citizens 

In order to provide uniformity of enforcement throughout the various counties 
if California, many of the functions are performed under the supervision of the 
lalifornia State Director of Agriculture. 

The California Agricultural Code, from which this office derives its author- 
.ty, became effective on August 21, 1933, when all laws pertaining to agriculture 
rere removed from other codes and consolidated into one code. The past two years 
;he code was re-edited and re-codified and this became effective on November 7»196?. 

The origin of the County Department of Agriculture dates back to the year 
.881 when the California State Legislature first authorized the appointment of 
lounty Boards of Horticultural Commissioners entitled: "An Act to Protect and Pro- 
lote the Horticultural Interests of the State." 

The California State Legislature in 1909, amended the act providing for the 
elimination of the three-man-board and setting up a single Horticultural Commissioner. 

As the work continued to broaden, the name was changed in 1931 to "Agricul- 
tural Commissioner." In 1937, the term "County Department of Agriculture" v/as 
iesignated as the official name of the department with the Agricultural Commissioner, 
.n charge. 

This department inspects fruits, vegetables, eggs, nuts, honey, poultry and 
'abbit meats in wholesale and retail establishments. It inspects nurseries, seed 
"irras, apiaries, post offices, express and freight terminals in order to detect plant 
liseases and insect pests and to enforce the plant quarantine requirements. We also 
:onduct pest surveys and maintain various insect traps. This department certifies 
agricultural products being exported to foreign countries in order to meet the re- 
luirements of 'freedom from pest and diseases. • 

We have put into operation this fiscal year a new program, it is called 
'Residential Grid Detection." One block is thoroughly checked at every 1/2 mile 
nterval. It is a survey specifically designed to detect, with a minimum manpower 



penditure, pests before they become established in an area. With the great in- 
»ase and speed of travel, the danger of introducing new pests becomes more acute, 
troductions are most apt to occur in urban areas. 

San Francisco County has 2 farms that produce vegetables on approximately 
acres, and 12 grower nurseries that produce potted plants and cut flov:ers in 
7,000 square feet of glasshouses, with a total gross value of $ 869,772. 

/enue From Two So urces : 

Revenue received in 1967-68, consisted of $3,300.00 from the State to aug- 
it the salary of the San Francisco Agricultural Commissioner, and 54,906.69 from 
port certification fees. 

In addition to the duties listed above, the Chief Administrative Officer has 
Legated to the Agricultural Commissioner the supervision of the Farmers' Market, 
;luding its functions and personnel. 

Following is a comparison breakdown of inspection services provided: 

PLANT QUARANTINE 

All shipments of nursery stock and plants, plant products including fruit, 
3d and grain, used agricultural implements and appliances; are required to be held 
r inspection upon first arrival in the county in order to prevent the entry of 
ant diseases, insects, noxious weeds or seeds, which may be detrimental to agricul- 
re. The post office, railway express, freight yards and commercial trucking con- 
rns are visited daily for this inspection. In addition, many plants are inspected 
nurseries. 

In many cases treatment can be applied to plants rejected, thus insuring 
Janliness; and the commodities may then be released. 



uit Quarantine 



1965-66 



1966-67 



1967-68 



Number of Premises 
Shipments Inspected 
Plants Inspected 
Plants Rejected 
Total Man Hours 


236 

7,537 

8,910,645 

4.219 

1,659 


240 

8,576 

10,285,382 

8,169 

1,482/2 


240 

12,842 
10,464,177 
17,760 
l,743 1 /<? 




STANDARDIZE 


ncN 





This is one of the major functions of this department. It relates to the in- 
! ction of fruits, nuts, vegetables, eggs, poultry meat, and honey, at the wholesale 
:duce terminal, retail stores, and any other place where produce is offered for sale. 
I s is to insure the enforcement of the requirements governing the quality, packing 
1. marketing of these products. We inspect and certify loads of commodities moving 
t erstate or intrastate; and to foreign countries when requested by shippers, to 
'w compliance vr.*i] Calif ornia.'s standardization requirements. 

[lesale Produce Market: 1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 



Number of Premises 


46 


Premises Insoected 


11,454 


Rejection Tags 


1.549 


Packages Rejected 


74,653 



47 


47 


11,430 


11,295 


1,006 


898 


56,825 


55,5% 



STANDARDIZATION - continued 



Retail Stores : 



1965-66 



1966-67 



1967-68 



Number of Premises 


2,l4l 


2,142 


2,145 


Premises Inspected 


1,687 


2,303 


1,616 


Rejection Tags 


225 


237 


254 


Packages Rejected 


1,404 


1,431 


2,778 


Packages Inspected 


194,941 


244,336 


214,687 


Farmers' Market: 








Number of Premises 


45 


45 


43 


Premises Inspected 


12,850 


12,950 


13,800 


Rejection Tags 


4o 


18 


20 


Packages Rejected 


1,829 


302 


1,069 


Packages Inspected 


160,901 


146,698 


143,777 


Total Man Hours for all 








Produce Inspection 


5,699 


5,394 1 / 2 


5,226 


Wholesale Eggs: 








Number of Premises 


20 


19 


17 


Premises Inspected 


617 


649 


607 


Dozens Rejected 


205,078 


158,130 


233,530 


Dozens Inspected 


i,on,o84 


848,952 


949,492 


Retail Eggs : 








Number of Premises 


2,132 


2,133 


2,135 


Premises Inspected 


1,972 


2,611 


1,905 


Dozens Rejected 


135,066 


103,702 


126,960 


Dozens Inspected 


664,659 


790,239 


676,060 



Total Man Hours for Whse, 
& Retail Egg Inspection 



3,7L2 



3,648 



3,513 



Poultry Meat : 



Number of Premises 


930 


930 


931 


Premises Inspected 


1,289 


1,688 


1,322 


Packages Rejected 


8,841 


2,098 


2,560 


Packages Inspected 


120,140 


160,192 


185,679 



Total Man Hours - Poultry 



450 1 /2 



524 



358 



Honey : 



Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 


2,147 

1,542 

715 

123,224 


2,148 

1,795 

561 

173,346 


2,150 

1,531 

1,033 

148,751 


Total Man Hours - Honey 


365 1 /a 


499/2 


323 


TOTAL MAN HOURS FOR ALL 
STANDARDIZATION 


10,227 


10,066 


7,329 



NURSERY INSPECTION 



All nurseries within the county are inspected at periodical intervals for 
;he presence of pests, and for compliance with Grades and Standards. If serious 
)ests are found, eradication measures must be taken immediately by the nursery. All 
)lants must be correctly labeled with the botanical name. 

1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 

Number of Nurseries 184 l82 180 

Premises Inspected 215 199 24l 

Total Man Hours 425 508 1 /2 475 

SEED INSPECTION 

This involves the inspection and sampling of agricultural and vegetable 
;eed lots at wholesale and retail locations for proper labeling as to germination. 



1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 



143 


140 


142 


90 


190 


156 


l52 1 /2 


236/2 


235 



Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Total Man Hours 



EXPORT CERTIFICATION 

This is the inspection of fruits and vegetables going to foreign countries, 
ind is done to insure the plant quarantine and standardization requirements of 
hose countries. A fee is charged for this work. 

1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 

Certificates Issued l,94l 1,705 1,685 

Packages Inspected 252,507 267,344 222,481 



DISPOSAL ORDERS ISSUED AT WHOLESALE PRODUCE TERMINAL 

Disposal orders are issued for produce that has been rejected, or has been 
n hand too long. It is not salvageable. 

1965-66 1966-67 1967-6P 

Disposal Orders Issued l,74l 1,530 1,992 

Number of Packages 97,794 43,283 51,920 



-24- 



PEST SURVEYS AND PEST CONTROLS 



Detection surveys are important for determining the possible presence of 
iw and dangerous agricultural pests. If pests can be discovered before they become 
io widely distributed, then there is a greater possibility of eradication. 

Pest control operators are licensed by the State Department of Agriculture. 
.ey must register with the Commissioner of the county in which the work is to be 

ne. 

State regulations specify conditions of workmanship, and the precautions in 
plication under direction of the Agricultural Commissioner. 



1965-66 



1966-67 



1967-68 



Number of Fruit Fly Traps 3° 

Number of Japanese Beetle 16 

Residential Grid Detection 

Permits Issued to Pest Control 

Operators 15 

Permits Issued for Use of Injur- 
ious Herbicides 16 

Permits Issued for Use of Injur- 
ious Materials 5 



30 

15 

13 
17 

k 



36 

30 

213 

Ik 

16 

6 



Total Man Hours 



2(A 



250 



286 1 / 2 



RELATED FU NCTIONS 

This includes the other varied activities such as giving garden advice to 
me owners, the gathering of crop statistics, certifying official fumigation 
ambers, and performing general public relations work. 



*********** 



SAN FRANCISCO FARMERS' MARICET 

Annual Report 
1967-1963 

The San Francisco Farmers' Market opened on August 12, 19^3, during the 
wartime as an outlet for surplus and distressed crops from the neighboring 
counties. Its first location was at Market Street and Duboce Avenue, and was 
operated by the farmers themselves. The City and County assumed management 
on August 1st, 19^. The Farmers' Market opened at its present location, at 
100 Alemany Boulevard, on August k, 19^+7, under a City Ordinance which author- 
izes the Chief Administrative Officer to establish a Farmers* Market to be 
administered by him or by any department under his jurisdiction. It is now 
under the supervision of the County Agricultural Commissioner who reports to 
the Chief Administrative Officer through the Director of Finance and Records. 



The Farmers' Market Ordinance requires that fees charged shall be suffi- 
cient to pay the operating and maintenance costs of the Market, and in 
addition, to repay the City and County within a reasonable period, any capital 
improvements at the Market. During the 1965-66 fiscal year, ^0 feet of roof 
w_as added to the south row of stalls at the east end of the Market. This cap- 
ital improvement provided the Market with a much needed additional roofed- in 
stall space at a cost of >10,266.33. As of June 30, 1956, .,320, '479. 70 had beer- 
repaid to the City. This is }6l,802.65 in excess of the cost of the land and 
capital improvements at the Farmers' Market, which amounted to Si>258, 677.05. 



Sales Promotion: 



Sales at the Market are promoted through news releases to newspapers^ 
radio and television stations, and other outlets. We also mail growers certi- 
ficates and news information about the Market to all growers who have used the 
Market in recent years. Informational letters concerning the market are sent 
to all County Agricultural Commissioners. 



The Market operates on a five day week, Tuesday through Saturday, from 
7:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. 



The Market celebrated its Twenty-fourth Anniversary on August 12th, 1967. 



The breakdown below summarizes the Farmers ' Market Capital Expenditures 
Program as of June 30, 1968. The City and County of San Francisco has been 
reimbursed for capital expenditures through the excess revenue each year. 



Capital Expenditures : (Adjusted to agree with Controller's figures 1963-64) 

Land 3 53,032.15 

Improvements 205)644.90 

Total 3 258,677.05 

Revenue and Operating Expenses : 

Revenues 749,429.31 

Less Operating Expenses .... 428,950.11 

320,479.70 

Excess of Net Revenue Over 

Capital Expenditures $ 61,802.65 



RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE FARMERS 1 MARKET: 



The following project is necessary for the maintenance of the Farmers ' Market 
Administration building: 



1. The interior of the administration building needs painting 
to maintain the appearance of the office, conference room, 
supply room and rest rooms. Painting will also prevent 
deterioration of the walls and woodwork. 



-27- 



COMPARISON SUfJ-lARY : 

The following tabulation is a summary of the Farmers' Market revenues, operating 
expenses, capital costs, and stall and tonnage fees from 1946 through June 30, 
1968: 



Fiscal 


Revenues 


Operating 


Excess of 


Stalls 


Tonnage 


Year 




Expenses 


Revenue 


Rented 




19^6-^7 


$ 16,006.5C 


S 4,101.48 


$ 11,905.02 


_ 


_ * 


1947-48 


19,748.00 


14,747.31 


5,020.19 


15,428 


6,035 


1945-49 


26,287.50 


15,285.47 


11,002.03 


17,267 


10,663 


1949-50 


32,190.50 


12,458.77 


19,731.73 


20,895 


11,695 


1950-51 


20,601.50 


21,231.69 


-(630.19) 


13,556 


7,337** 


1951-52 


29,363.50 


21,651.73 


7,711.77 


1M31 


3,156 


1952-53 


33,403.25 


18,374.48 


15,028.77 


18,726 


8,813 


1953-5^ 


37,423.50 


lo,670.37 


13,753.13 


20,662 


9,457 


1954-55 


37,916.25 


18,661.35 


19,254.90 


21,495 


9,481 


1955-56 


35,142.00 


17,675.67 


17,466.33 


20,755 


7,927 


1956-57 


34,812.06 


18,454.77 


16,357.29 


20,534 


3,019 


1957-58 


34,844.00 


19,143.69 


15,695.31 


20,659 


7,694 


1958-59 


40,934.00 


22,475.13 


13,453.82 


22,712 


6,885 


1959-60 


46,850.75 


19,533.62 


27,267.13 


22,128 


6,806 


1960-61 


47,159.50 


20,708.90 


26,450.60 


22,461 


6,651 


1961-62 


41,769.75 


25,129.64 


16,640.11 


21,012 


5,675 


1962-63 


38,763.75 


20,232.25 


18,531.50 


18,683 


5,244 


1963-64 


37,541.00 


21,863.44 


15,677.56 


18,367 


4,897 


1964-65 


36,058.00 


23,156.33 


12,901.67 


17,398 


4,396 


1965-66 


35,892.00 


24,318.17 


11,573.83 


17,847 


4,035 


1966-67 


34,714.00 


24,767.28 


9,946.72 


17,288 


3,668 


1967-68 


32,008.50 


26,273.02 


5,735.48 


15,781 


3,^31 


8 7^9,429.81 


$ 428,950.11 


$ 320,479.70 


398,635 


147, 140 



* Records are incomplete for fiscal year. 

** Market was closed from February to July due to 
construction of new stalls. 



The decrease in gross revenue for the year is the result of less tonnage 
being brought into the Market and fewer stalls being rented. This condition is 
the result of: 

1. The rain and cold weather from January through June, 1967- 
This unfavorable weather was the cause of severe losses of 
crops and the late maturing of those crops which were not 
lost. The loss to the Market is 1507 fewer stall spaces 
rented and 237 tons less produce brought into the Market 
in fiscal year 1967-68 as compared with the previous fiscal 
year 1966-67. The loss in gross receipts to the Market is 
32705.00 for 1967-68, as compared with 1966-67. 



2. Less acreage under 
selling their farm 



cultivation because small farmers are 
land for sub-dividing and development. 



-28- 



REGISTRY OF VOTERS 
1967 - 1968 

By authority of Charter Section 173 and the State Election Code, the Registrar 
f Voters is responsible for the conduct, management and control of the registration 
f voters, and of the holding of elections and of all other matters pertaining to 
Lections in the City and County. The small permanent staff has remained constant 
ar many years. This force is augmented by seasonal workers, as required, during the 
egistration and election periods. On Election Day, about ^500 precinct officials 
re employed. 

Late in May, 1967 » San Francisco's 9th Senatorial District representative, 
. Eugene McAteer died unexpectedly. 

Governor Reagan immediately c a lled a Special Election to succeed Mr. McAteer, 
rfhich necessitated a Primary Election to be held prior.) 

tie Primary was held July 18, 1967, at which Democrat John L. Burton and Republican 
Llton Marks, became their partys' nominees. 

In the August 15th run-off, Republican Marks won the office. 

3w Political Parties; 

Both the Peace and Freedom Party and the American Independent Party qualified 
5 recognized political entities by filing sufficient numbers of registrations with 
tie various California counties, who certified the valid signatures to the Secretary 
f State. 

When the number of new registrants reached 1% of the 1966 General Election 
Dte, both parties became qualified and first appeared on the June Primary ballot. 

sw Filing Fees: 

When the number of candidates for Mayor and Supervisor reached ridiculous 
roportions in November of 1967, the Board of Supervisors submitted two Charter 
nendments to a vote of the people to remedy the situation. 

Both Charter Amendments were adopted by the electorate, with the following 
ffect: 

A. The filing fee, formerly i30.00, was increased to 2% of the annual 
salary of the office sought by each candidate. 

B. The required number of sponsors was approximately quadrupled. 

C. Certain discretionary deletions will now be permitted in the prepar- 
ation of the voter's pamphlet, which will save printing costs and 
make the pamphlet less repetitious and more readable. 



-29- 



)ptical Scanning Counting. EDP: 

In the June 4, 1968 Primary Election, a new technique was introduced wherein 
;he semi-official count on election night was handled by the Electronic Data 
^ocessing Bureau. 

Special mark sensing sheets were used to create electronic tapes which were 
•.hen fed into computers to produce periodic result print-outs. 

The count was not completed until the following morning, but the time at which 
fe finished the count compared favorably with other counties in California. 

The EDP Bureau continues to provide us with Index tapes and print-outs, and 
)ther materials needed in our operations and activities. 

Che November 5< 1968 Presidential Election: 

Our registration for the June Primary Election totaled 348,111 persons. Based 
mi experience we estimate some 52,400 more persons will register and be eligible to 
rote in the Presidential Election of November 4, 1968, bringing the expected final 
figures to 400,500. 

As all Presidential General Elections bring a heavy vote, a minimum of 85% of 
;he total registration are expected to cast ballots in November of 1968, which 
jould mean a turn out of some 340 , 000 voters. 

?-Year Workload Comparison 

Regular eleotions (number) 

Registration affidavits 
processed 

Registration affidavits 
canceled 

Sample ballots mailed 

Absentee ballots requested 
paper 

Absentee vote (paper) 

Absentee vote (machine) 

Precincts used 

/oting Machines used 

/oting machines loane^fleased 

?recinct vote (machines) 

[total votes cast 

inployee group elections 

(ballots) 12,195 12,629 26,157 13,725 29,187 

conclusion: 

Four elections were compressed into the 1967 - 68 fiscal period. This gave 
Little time for any reorganization of the existing office structure. 

We have been hard hit by personnel transfers and retirements, and hope to get 
u breathing spell after the November, 1968 Presidential Election during which we 
lope to stabilize and reorganize our present office structure. 

-30- 



1963-64 


1964-63 


1965-66 


1966-67 


1967-68 


2 


£ 


2 


1 


4 


81,394 


64,638 


54,333 


73,192 


102,667 


41,382 


82,908 


38,390 


74,109 


40,219 


785,323 


389,900 


701,497 


372,123 


1,263,564 


8,224 


14,198 


7,615 


12,370 


24,602 


7,160 


12,602 


6,794 


10,613 


21,779 


7,451 


5,287 


5,780 


5,793 


19,059 


3,140 


1,341 


2,686 


1,340 


1,349 


3,761 


1,670 


3,275 


1,670 


5,897 


I 233 


274 


313 


260 


270 


527,320 


313,723 


425,249 


328,591 


877,928 


541,931 


331,612 


438,656 


372,188 


919,546 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR - PUBLIC GUARDIAN (1967-68) 
Public Administrator 

The Public Administrator is an officer of the County Government 
as described in Section 24000 of the Government Code and as provided 
for in the Charter of the City and County of San Francisco. The pur- 
pose of the office is to provide for the protection of the property 
of deceased persons and for the protection of the interests of heirs 
and creditors in such property. 

The duties of the Public Administrator as both a conservator 
and an administrator of the estates of deceased persons is set forth 
in Section 1140 of the Probate Code, as follows: "The Public Adminis- 
trator of each county must take immediate charge of the property 
within his county of persons who have died when no executor or adminis- 
trator has been appointed and in consequence thereof the property, or 
any part thereof, is being wasted, uncared for or lost; and of all 
estates ordered into his hands by the Court. He shall apply for letters 
of administration upon estates of decedents who have no known heirs 
when the Superior Court of his county has jurisdiction thereof, and 
may apply for such letters upon any other estate upon which he is 
entitled to administer." 

All functions pertaining to each estate are handled by the 
office staff. These functions include - the investigation, making 
funeral arrangements, applications for letters, collection of all 
assets, payment of all legal debts, sales of real and personal property, 
filing and defending suits, obtaining all county, state, and Federal 
tax clearances, and distribution to heirs and the State of California. 
A complete and thorough investigation must be made of each estate 
reported - without a proper investigation there could be a loss of 
revenue to the county as well as a loss to the creditors and heirs. 

Investigation of Cases 

Approximately 40 per cent of the cases investigated are adminis- 
tered by the Public Administrator's Office. The remaining 60 per cent 
either have no assets or are turned over to the named executor or 
administrator who may have a priority to serve. The above is one of 
the service functions of this office. 

5 Year Workload Comparison 



Estates Investigated 
New Estates Opened 
Einal Accounts Filed 
Discharges Filed 
Open Estates 

(End of Year) 
Revenue from Fees 
Operating Expenses 
Met Revenue 



1964-65 


1965-66 


1966-67 


1967-68 


1968-69 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Estimate 


1,359 


1,362 


1,376 


1,358 


1,400 


505 
253 

313 


609 
190 
309 


560 
289 
487 


510 

311 
373 


500 
325 
400 


1,399 
$193 ,442 
$154,996 


1,699 
$193,000 
$166,000 


1,772 
$258,000 
$162,000 


1,909 
$309,000 
$166,000 


2,000 
$220,000 
$181,000 


$ 38,446 


$ 27,000 


$ 96,000 


$143,000 


$ 33,000 



-31- 



The Public Administrator's Office is entirely self-supporting 
and as a matter of fact produces a profit for the City and County of 
San Francisco out of the revenues received from the estates of 
decedents. These revenues pay not only for the services in the general 
estates , but also for the free services provided in investigating 
decedents' deaths where no estates are ever opened by the Public 
Administrator. 

Efficiency of Administration 

The fact that the Public Administrator does receive statutory 
fees in the general probates also imposes some obligation on him to 
the heirs and creditors to at least give them the same attention as 
would private administrators. Keirs are frequently prepared to be 
critical of the Public Administrator's Office, especially in those 
cases in which thev have been denied the right to probate the estate 
because of their non-residence. They feel that, if they had been 
allowed to administer the estate, they could do a much more efficient 
job and a much speedier job than the Public Administrator. As a 
matter of fact, the Public Administrator's Office would not bow to any 
other administrator whether a corporate institution, such as a bank, 
or a private individual, as to the efficiency and speed with which 
probate matters are administered. 

The public, of course, is not aware of this and the constant 
problem of attempting to please the unreasonable as well as the 
reasonable segments of the public means that every step must be taken 
that will insure a more efficient use of the staff. Actually, most 
expenditures which could be made to increase efficiency would, in fact, 
not be additional expense, but rather an investment to return more 
income to the City. There is every indication that the number of 
cases and the amount of money to be returned in estates will, during 
the years, continue to increase. The sooner these cases can be pro- 
cessed to completion, the sooner the fees are returned to the City 
treasury. 

10 Year Comparison - Expenditures and Revenues 





Budgeted 


Actual 










Fiscal 


Expendi- 


Expendi- 


Differ- 


Estimated 


Actual 


Differ- 


Year 


tures 


tures 


ence 


Revenue 


Revenue 


ence 


1957-58 


$109,610 


$106,009 


$-3,601 


$180,000 


$179,039 


$- 961 


1953-59 


115,454 


114,215 


-1,239 


180,000 


176,538 


- 3,462 


1959-60 


118,185 


115,716 


-2,469 


185,000 


205,249 


20,249 


196C-61 


134,654 


129,742 


-4,912 


200,000 


203,570 


3,570 


1961-62 


147,520 


138,761 


-8,759 


210,000 


181,652 


-28,348 


1962-63 


150,721 


147,190 


-3,531 


200,000 


230,508 


30,508 


1963-64 


155,791 


149,160 


-6,631 


207,000 


215,610 


8,610 


1964-65 


162 ,441 


154,996 


-7,850 


200,000 


193,442 


- 6,558 


1965-66 


171,478 


166,276 


-5,202 


200,000 


192,645 


- 7,355 


1966-67 


158,425 


162,033 


3,608 


200,000 


257,500 


57,500 


1957-68 


170,000 


166,537 


-3,463 


200,000 


309,000 


109,000 


1968-69 


181,299 






200,000 







-32- 



Public Guardian 

The office of Public Guardian was created in San Francisco 
County on July 1, 1960, under authority of Section 5175 of the Welfare 
and Institutions Code of the State of California. On July 1, 1960, 
the Public Administrator became ex officio Public Guardian. The pur- 
pose of the office is to provide a public officer to serve, when 
needed, as guardian of the person and/or estate of persons who ai-'e 
patients in county facilities or recipients of aid under the Welfare l 
and Institutions Code. 

The Public Guardian, like any other guardian appointed by the 
Court, has the care and custody of the person of his ward and the 
management of his estate until legally discharged, or in the case of 
the guardianship of a minor, until the minor reaches the age of 
majority, or the ward marries at 18 or over. The guardian must pay 
the ward's just debts as far as the estate is able, if necessary sell- 
ing the ward's real property or borrowing on it. He must demand, sue 
for and collect all debts due the ward. He must appear for and 
represent the ward in all actions or proceedings. He must manage the 
ward's estate frugally and without waste and apply the income as far 
as necessary to the convenience, suitable support, maintenace , and 
age of the ward. 

He must file an inventory of all the estate's assets, together 
with an appraisal of the assets, unless the estate consists of money 
only, or money and other personal property of a market value of less 
than $50.09. He must file periodic accounts for approval by the Court. 
Upon the death of the ward, if no probate of the estate is necessarv, 
the funeral and last illness expenses may be paid, and, after such 
payment of these expenses and of the fees of the Public Guardian, a 
balance of cash remains in the estate, this may be delivered to the 
heirs at law under Section 6 30 of the Probate Code or delivered to the 
Public Administrator for administration. 

The Public Guardian program has been in operation for eight 
years. The program is beneficial both to the ward and to the count'/. 
The ward is benefited by the personal attention of this office. The 
county is benefited by the payments for hospitalization and for back 
obligations of the ward. Without the Public Guardian program these 
incompetent people would be unable to collect welfare assistance, 
Social Security, and other pensions or benefits to which they are 
entitled. 

Eases Crowded Hospital Condition 

Where possible and when it appears to be in the best interest 
of the wards , they are moved from the county facilities to private 
rest homes. This provides additional beds at the San Francisco General 
Hospital for patients who are more in need of medical assistance. 



-33- 



1965-66 


1966-67 


Actual 


Actual 


1,163 


2,141 


398 


446 


247 


152 



1367-68 


1953-69 


Actual 


Estimated 


1,696 


1,700 


498 


600 


124 


150 


74 


100 


131,000 


$ 150,000 



'■.'orkload Comparison 



1964-65 
Actual 
Applications 

Investigated 529 

Total Wards as 

of June 30 213 

Mew Wards during 

Year 46 

Guardianships 

Terminated 70 61 102 

Expenditures $ 25,312 $ 91,000 $ 116,000 $ 131,000 

Benefits to 

County $537,387 $761,000 $1,762,000 $1,800,000 $2,000,000 

Revenues from 

Fees $ 8,734 $ 9,100 $ 18,500 $ 19,000 $ 20,000 

Fees 

The Welfare and Institutions Code provides that upon termination 
of the guardianship, either by death or restoration to competency, the 
Public Guardian may now be awarded fees by the judge of the Superior 
Court on the filing of the final account. The fees for the last fiscal 
year amounted to $19,000.00. These fees are in addition to other 
benefits, both direct and indirect, received through This program. 

Present and Anticipated Future Requirements 

As noted, even though the workload has increased, the present 
staff is able to handle the current workload. Due to the physical 
consolidation of the Public Administrator - Public Guardian office, 
the loss of four requested positions did not handicap the operation 
of the office as much as was expected. The utilization of personnel 
formerly assigned only to the respective offices in either program has 
afforded more flexibility to meet fluctuation in the workload of each 
office. 

As reported last year, two situations have increased the work- 
load; namelv, (1) the burial of the indigent dead; and (2) the investi- 
gation and burial arrangements of competent persons who die outside of 
the county and who are recipients of welfare benefits. 

At present the San Francisco College of Mortuary Science has a 
contract with the City and County of San Francisco for the removal and 
burial of the indigent dead. Due to the increased number of welfare 
recipients dying outside the county, the determination of indigency, 
especially at nights and on weekends , has become a serious problem. 
The jurisdiction of various County Departments (such as the Department 
°f Public Health, the Coroner, and the Public Administrator) in deter- 
mining the indigency of these decedents is in doubt. At joint meetings 



of representatives of these departments, it was concluded on a purely 
practical basis that the Public Administrator was in the best position 
to determine indigency and to complete the necessary arrangements when 
the death occurs during the night or weekend hours. At this time there 
is no way to make any reasonable calculation as to the effect on the 
Public Administrator workload in the near future. 

The other situation which affects the workload is the increasing 
practice by the Department of Social Welfare and the County Hospitals 
of placing competent patients in nursing and convalescent homes in 
other counties (Alameda, Contra Costa, Napa, Solano, San Mateo, Marin, 
Sonoma). Since these persons are involuntarily removed, they are 
residents of San Francisco and the other counties will not assume 
liability for their burial. 

At the joint meetings referred to above, a practical working 
arrangement has been initiated whereby the other affected departments 
are supposed to supply the Public Administrator's office with detailed 
information as to these placements and the history and assets of the 
patients. 

The 1968 session of the State Legislature enacted certain 
legislation and amended various code sections that will affect the 
caseload of the Public Administrator - Public Guardian office. It may 
be necessary during the coming year to request additional help - 
particularly for the Public Guardian program. 



-35- 



TAX COLLECTOR 



1967-68 



The Tax Collector operates under several sets of laws, either 
State or Local, as the basic nature of the task to be done dictates. 
As a County Officer he must observe the directives of the State Revenue 
and Taxation Code in: (a) collecting current and delinquent real and 
personal property taxes, (b) preparing and publishing by Sept. 8 of each 
year a list of delinquent real estate tax payers, (c) making required 
periodic reports to the State Controller and to the local auditor, 
(d) executing deeds to the State of California on properties delinquent 
for five or more years, (e) making provisions to hold public auctions of 
tax-deeded properties and the actual auctions themselves, and (f) making 
refunds on duplicate or erroneous payments. 

As a City Officer he proceeds under the Charter and Ordinances of 
the City and County in: (a) collecting licenses, (b) operating the 
Bureau of Delinquent Revenue, (c) collecting Parking Keter receipts, 
(d) collecting the Hotel Room Tax, and (e) making the reports and 
settlements required of a local official who collects monies. 

During 1967-68, there was again an appreciable increase in the 
work load of the Tax Collector's Office. The increased activity occurred 
in all eight of the Divisions that comprise the Tax Office. These are: 
Cashier's Division, Real Estate Tax Division, Parking Keter Division, 
Bureau of Delinquent Revenue, Bureau of Licenses, Legal Bureau, Hotel 
Tax Bureau, and Investigators Division. 

Cashier's Division 

During the last fiscal year, the Cashier's Division of the Tax 
Collector's Office collected $221,769,421.87, an all-time high for the 
fourteenth consecutive year. 

Peak periods for tax collection were from July 15 to September 15 
for unsecured personal property taxes, and from November 1 to December 
15 and March 1 to April 15 for real property taxes. Peak periods for 
license collections were in January, July and October. 

Following is a table of collections for the various divisions 
for 1967-68, as compared with 1966-67. 

1966-67 1967-68 

Real Property Taxes and Secured 

Personal Property Taxes .... <;.l47, 518,625.64 3 170, 634, 281.31 

Unsecured Personal Property Taxes 31,715,149.34 19,428,682.21 

Uniform Sales and Purchase Tax 21 ,048,186.66 22,884,665.84 

Parking Meters ........ 1,496,361.99 1,395,855.49 

Delinquent Revenue 4,456,670.76 3,553,429.45 

Licenses ........... 2,833,744.29 3,526,547.56 

Miscellaneous 70,270.30 ?6,So4.71 

tot;.l . . . 5209,139,008.98 3221,500,266.57 

-36- 



Unsecured Personal Property - 1968 , 242,295.07 

Unsecured Person?.! Property - 1968 (Abstracts) 26,860.23 



GRAND TOTAL ■3221, 769, 421. 87 



The £23,000,000 increase in real property taxes is due to the 
increased assessments, since the tax rate was lowered from :10.6l to 



Real Estate Tax Division 

Reconversion to an Electronic Data I rocossing program has been 
somewhat delayed, due to other E.D.P. schedulings. The July Real 
Estate Rolls, the Hailing Lists, and the November bills are all being 
electronically produced. Programming by the E.D.F. staff is proceeding, 
with the ultimate objective of having all tax collection procedures and 
accounts done electronically. Rapidity of accomplishment is, of course, 
contingent upon the amount of attention that can be given by the E.D.F. 
staff to Tax Office matters. 

Due to our implied legal obligation to mail tax bills to an 
address that has been given to the County Recorder, it is imperative 
that E.D.P. help us keep current on new deed recordings. 

Real Estate tax delinquencies in San Francisco are still the 
lowest among all maior counties in the State. 

The following table shows delinquencies for 1967-68, compared 
with 1966-67. 

Real Property Unsecured Eroperty 
Taxes Taxes 

Amount Delinquent June 30, 1963 32,351,898.99 3 494,516.19 

Amount Delinquent Juno 30, 1967 2,l8l,828.51 1,686,155.18 

Fer Cent Delinquent June 30, 1968 1.37 2.37 

Per Cent Delinquent June 30, I967 1.46 2.59 

There were 3,400 parcels sold to the State and 16 deeded to the 
State in 1967-68, compared to 2,737 parcels sold to the State and 12 
deeded to the State in the prior fiscal year. 

Uniform Sales and Pu rchase Tax 

San Francisco's Uniform Sales and Purchase Tax has been collected 
since July 1, 1958, by the State of California as agent for the City 
and County, and the revenues minus collection costs are returned to the 
City and County. 

The figures for this, and last year, are shown previously in 
this report. 



-37- 



Farkinp; Meter Division 

The- Parking Motor Division collects, sorts and counts, and 
prepares for deposit all coin deposited in approximately 12,000 parking 
meters in San Francisco. Thirteen collectors are used in the operation, 
eight men in three panel trucks collecting the money and winding the 
springs of about 4,250 meters daily, while five men in the office- 
process the coins. Of the 47,876,110 coins handled during the fiscal 
year 1967-68, 32,290,300 or 67.5% were pennies; 9,740,020 or 20.3% 
were nickels and 5 18451790 or 12,2% were dimes. The total weight of 
the coins processed during the year wa.s 360,952 pounds. 

During the year 820 lbs. of mutilated coins, plugs, can rings and 
foreign coins were processed. Canadian and other foreign coins were 
redeemed for vl, 372.28. 

The decrease in weight and revenue is attributed to the- removal 
of many meters during the construction of B.JRT and other buildings in 
the financial district. 

/« comparison of yearly parking meter revenue follows: 

1960-61 ;ll, 500, 003 1964-65 31,550,903 

1961-62 1,459,558 1965-66 1,569,204 

1962-63 1,491,368 1966-67 1,496,361 

1963-64 1,467,727 1967-68 1,395,855 

Bureau of Delinquent Revenu e 

.'. total of 4,602 accounts, other than personal property billings, 
was transferred to the Bureau of Delinquent Revenue by various City and 
County departments during 1967-63. 

The number of accounts handled represents a continuous increase- 
over these of previous fiscal years. This was accomplished with no 
increase in the number of personnel and without a full crew of 
investigators in the field for the entire year. 

As part of the reform program many more personal property bills 
have been placed on the secured roll resulting in a slight drop of the 
unsecured bills transferred to the Tax Collector. 

Cost to the City and County for monies collected by the Bureau 
of Delinquent Revenue was approximately 5% during the same fiscal year. 

Following is a summary of activities cf the Bureau for 1967-68 
showing also a comparison with 1966-67. 

1966-67 1967-68 

No. Unsec. Prop. Tax Bills 100,000 93,015 

Collections, Unsec. Del. Prop. 

Taxes !10,223,756.20 C3, 692, 310. 21 

-38- 



1966-67 1967-68 

No. Tub. Health Dept. Del. ..ccts. 942 1,670 

Collections, Fub. Health Dept. '■: 313,451.82 Z 366,456.84 

No. Pub. Library Del. ..ccts. 2,5l8 2,080 

Collections, Public Library 7,107.63 6,243.36 

New Sonoma Hone ;.ccts, 17 8 

Collections, Sonona Hone 85,175.02 85,226.41 

No. Other City & Co. Dept. 

Del. :.ccts. 673 725 

Collections, Other Depts. 53,098.77 6l, 812.71 

No. Interest, Fees, 

Court Costs ..ccts. 203 129 

Collections, Interest, Fees, 

Court Costs 1, if 75. 76 852.64 

Total No. Accounts Received 104,353 97,627 

Total Collections, Delinquent 

..ccounts : 10, 684, 065. 20 <J 4,213,048.07 

As part of collection enforcement procedures, 274 court actions 
were instituted in 1966-67. Of this tctal, 149 were filed in Snail 
Clains Court, 120 in the Municipal Court and 5 in the Superior Court. 

Bureau of Lic enses 

For the fiscal year 1967-68 the Bureau of Licenses shewed an 
increase in gross receipts. ..s an efficiency neve, we have endeavored 
to place licenses on an annual , rather than a quarterly basis, wherever 
possible. Following is a breakdown of licenses by type, number and 
amount for 1967-68 compared to 1966-67* 

1966 1967 1967 1968 





Number 


..mount 


Number 


.xi cunt 


General Business 


29,650 :; 


709,974.00 


28,649 


702,323.32 


Vehicles 


377 


40,112.75 


379 


4o,577.oo 


Bicycles 


3,399 


1,698.50 


2,949 


1,500.50 


Inspection Fees 


2,361 


76,381.33 


2,466 


90,321.25 


Contractors 


2,164 


21,800.00 


2,069 


20,882.00 


Miscellaneous 


4,076 


8,985.50 


4,076 


7,505.55 


Dog 


30,210 


120,836.00 


31,004 


124,012.00 


Duplicate Dog Tags 


345 


172.50 


398 


200,50 


Curb Painting 


18 


2,305.65 


8 


1,972.49 


Meat 


608 


19,170.00 


480 


16,397.75 



Tot^.l (Excluding 
Hotel Room Tax) 73,208 8 1,001, 436. 73 72,478 3 1,005, 692. 36 



-39- 



1966 1967 1967 19 68 

Number Amount Number ..mount 

Hotel Room Tax 1,495 *1, 832, 298. 96 1,431 32, 520, 873. 25 

GR..1ID T0T..L 

License Bureau 74,703 £2, 833, 735. 69 73,909 i3, 526,565.61 



Hotel Room Tax Sub- Bu reau 

..lthough a separate Budget item, the Hotel Room Tax as shewn 
above is collected by the Bureau of Licenses. 

Each quarterly amount represents the tax collected by the 
hotels between the dates specified. 

A comparison of collections by quarters follows: 

1966 - 1967 1967 - 1968 

July 1 - September 30 Z 442,523.53 Z 472,091.39 

October 1 - December 31 542,794.94 587,052.27 

January 1 - March 31 429,381.89 725,782.69 

April 1 - June 30 417,598.60 735,946.90 



TOTAL Z 1,832, 298. 96 Z 2,520,873.25 



■40- 



f 



<? 



1968-69 

Annual Report 



DIRECTOR OF 
FINANCE AND RECORDS 



DOCUMENTS 
SEP 2 3 1969 



^SAUCiSCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 




INCLUDING 



County Clerk Recorder Records Center 

Registrar of Voters Tax Collector 

Records Preservation Officer 

Public Guardian Public Administrator 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Agricultural Commissioner Farmers' Market 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Director of Finance and Records 

September 1, 1969 



Subject: 1968-69 Annual 
Report 
Honorable Thomas J. Mellon 
Chief Administrative Officer 
City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Mr. Mellon: 

We herein submit the annual report for the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1969, covering the City and County departments 
and offices under the jurisdiction of the Director of Finance and 
Records. 

Subject to your approval, we administer the services and 
activities of the Departments of Finance and Records, Weights and 
Measures, and Agriculture, which include the offices of County 
Clerk, Recorder, Registrar of Voters, Public Administrator, Public 
Guardian, Tax Collector, Records Center, Records Preservation 
Officer, Sealer of Weights and Measures, Farmers' Market and 
Agricultural Commissioner. 

Separate reports for each of these offices are included 
herein, together with the statistical data requested by the Mayor. 
Each separate report was prepared by the office head concerned. 

Offices which support or approximately support themselves 
through fees collected for services provided, are the Recorder, 
Public Administrator, and Farmers' Market. The Public Guardian 
likewise more than pays its own way, the benefits realized largely 
through hospital benefits paid in behalf of the wards. 

Very truly yours, 



'JOiA-JL^Zmiotb 



VIRGIL L. ELLIOTT 
Director 



INDEX 



Letter of Transmittal 1 

Index 2 

Organization Chart 3 

Records Center k 

Records Preservation Officer 6 

County Clerk 10 

Recorder 16 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 19 

Agricultural Commissioner • 2k 

Farmers ' Market 29 

Registrar of Voters 33 

Public Administrator-Public Guardian 35 

Tax Collector ^0 



-2- 



ORGANIZATION CHART ~ DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND RECORDS 
City and County of Sim Francisco, Calif oinia 



MAYOR AND EOARD OF SUPERVISORS 



LEGAL 


City 


& Diot Attya 




PROPERTY 


Real 


Estate Dapt. 



FISCAL 



Controller, Tresc 



DIRECTOR'S OFFICE 



2 eaployocs 



PERSONNEL 



Civil Servi< 



CHIEF 
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 



Thomas J. Mellon 
I 



DIRECTOR 

of 

FINANCE AND RECORDS 



Virgil L. Elliott 



J 



EMPLOYEE WELFAK 



Rot. Sys., H.S.S, 



SUPPLY 



Purchasing Dep t. 



MAIN . . REPAIR 



Pub. Works Dept. 



DATA PROCESSING 



Controller 






REGISTRAR 
OF VOTERS 



Basil Healey 



Register San Francisco 
voters; conouct elec- 
tions, INCLUDING EM- 
PLOYE e elections; 

MAINTAIN VOTING HA. 
CH I NES . 



2 k e-aployees 



COUNTY CLERX, 
RECORDER 

Martin Mons&a 



keep records of " 
Superiof. Court; 
issue marr i age li 
censes; provide 
cour troom clerks] 
recoro a no index 
d ocume nts. 



90 employees 



TAX 

COLLECTOR 



Londo Casacsa 



Collect ad valorem 
and unsecured taxes 
parking meter re- 
ceipts ; issue bus i - 
ness licenses, re- 
ceive purchase and 
use tax receipts. 

COLLECT HOTEL TAX 



11 em plo yees 



PUBLIC ADMIN., 

PUBLIC GUARDIAN 

Con S. Shoa 



ADMINISTER ESTATES; 
SERVES AS PUBLIC 
GUARD IAN. 



27 em ployees 



6-30-6 9 



AGRICULTURAL 
COMMISSIONER 



R. L. Bozzini 



I NSPECTS FRUITS, ȣC 
ETABLES, NUTS, POUL- 
TRY, EGGS, HONEY, 
NURSERY, PEST CONTROL 
& SEED", INSPECT FOR 
PLANT OUARANTINE AND 
EXPORT CERTIFICATES. 



9 employees 





RECORDS 


CENTER 


Wm. Satterfield 


3 employees 


, — — ,_. — , 


FARMERS' 


KARI'-iT 


F. J.O'Connell 


3 employees 



SEALER OF 
WTS. fc MEASURES 



O.C. Skinner, Jr 



Test weighing and 
measuring devices, 
inspect packaged 
commoo i t i es . 



9 employees 



RECORDS CENTER 
1968-69 

The Records Center was established l8 years ago by ordinance of 
the Board of Supervisors. This ordinance authorizes the Chief Administrative 
Officer to establish, maintain and operate within a department under his 
jurisdiction a Records Center for the "orderly storage, care, management and 
safeguarding of storage records of the departments and offices of the City 
and County and of the San Francisco Unified School District." The Chief 
Administrative Officer has delegated to the Director of Finance and Records 
the authority to administer the operations and personnel of the Records 
Center. Two Clerks and a Principal Clerk comprise the Center's staff. 

Under provisions of the Administrative Code, services of the Records 
Center are provided without charge, including storage boxes, transportation 
of boxes and reference services. Paper records are stored at 144 Townsend 
and at the old Municipal Railway streetcar barn, Geary Boulevard and 
Masonic Avenue. In June about 10,000 cubic feet were moved out of 
930 Bryant Street to the Townsend Street building. The moving cost was 
$6,600, and an additional $4,472 was spent for metal shelving. 

Microfilm Records Stored Underground : 

Microfilm records are stored in the underground vault beneath the 
Municipal Railway's Forest Hill Station. Most microfilm images are on 
100-foot, 16-mm reels and placed in cartons 2" x 4" x 1" in size. These 
cartons are stored in fireproof metal safes which have combination locks. 
Double fireproof doors protect against unauthorized entry to the vault 
room, wherein temperature and humidity controls have been provided. 

Following is a 5-year comparison of factors involving operation of 
the Records Center: 

1964-65 65-66 66-67 67-68 68-69 

Records in storage ( cu. f t. ) 

Records received, indexed 

Disposal of Useless Records 

References to Records 

Expenditures 

Cost per cubic foot 

Reference records are delivered twice daily to the departments, 
and returned via public transit. A small motorized vehicle would facilitate 
this task. 

A breakdown of records in storage as of June 50 , 1969, is shown on 
the next page. 



32,266 


35,317 


37,755 


38,220 


36,404 


1,319 


5,224 


3,217 


2,060 


1,774 


677 


2,173 


-0- 


1,595 


3,370 


28,218 


27,222 


23,024 


21,342 


23,232 


$32,232 


8 34, 067 


s 32, 522 


$31,262 


$47,088 


SI. 02 


$ .96 


% .86 


$ .82 


$1.29 



-4- 



RECORDS IN STORAGE AS OF JUNE 30, 1969 



MICROFILM 
DEPARTMENT (100' Reels) 

Adult Probation 

Art \ 

Assessor 38 S 

Board of Permit Appeals . . . . , 

Board of Supervisors 70.0 

Calif. Palace Legion of Honor ... '3 
Chief Administrative Officer 

City Attorney , 

City Planning ^5 

Civil Service ........... 73 

Controller ll'.G 

DeYoung Museum * . . . . 8 

District Attorney 

Electricity 3 x 

Fair Employment 

Finance and Records: 

County Clerk (Superior Court) . . 55.5 

Recorder 4,066.0 

Registrar of Voters 

Public Administrator 

Tax Collector 7^3 

Weights and Measures 

Law Library g q 

Mayor .. 

Municipal Court 55.0 

Public Defender , 

Public Health: Mental Hygiene ." 
Child Psychiatric Clinic .... 
Crippled Children's Services . . 

City Clinic 

Laguna Honda 

Other Health Services I5.O ■ 

S.F. General Hospital 

Public Utilities: 

Airport 1.5 

Bur. of Light, Heat and Power . . 2.5 

General Office P.U.C 

Hetch Hetchy 15 #0 

Municipal Railway 3*5 

Utilities Engineering Bureau . . 525.0 

Water 74.0 

Public Works: 

Army Street Office 

Engineering Office & Architecture 

Main Office 55.8 

Sewer Repair Division 

Purchasing 

Real Estate 

Recreation and Park 6.5 

Retirement System 8.5 

5 chools 1,064 [5 

Sheriff -^3 

Social Services 

Superior Court (Sec'y Records) . . 2.3 

Youth Guidance Center 

T0TAL 6,150.0 



PAPER RECORDS 


1968-69 


(Cubic Feet) 


References 


268 


38 


16 




251 


10 


11 




55 1 * 


52 




2 


6 


2 


934 


80 


121 


55 


1,323 


259 


5,190 


2 




1 


26 


3 


4 


4 


13,718 


15,785 


583 


10 


49 


1 


422 


59 


332 


942 


4 




12 




3,274 


2,437 


50 


1 




34 


211 


25 


148 


157 


3> 


603 


318 


39 


271 


4 


1,918 


65 


107 


3 


100 


2 


337 


34 




21 


84 


2 


638 


3 


200 


21 


41 


2 


3 




1,204 


26 


105 


4 


1,283 


7 


1,634 


66 


29 






6 


311 


1,360 



36,424 



22,227 



RECORDS PRESERVATION OFFICER 
1968-69 

The Administrative Code, Sections 8.9 through 8.11, provides that the 
"public interest demands that various City and County records which v»ould be 
essential to the continuity of government and the protection of rights and 
interest of individuals in event of a major disaster be preserved against 
possible destruction by fire, earthquake, flood, enemy attack or other 
cause." 

This ordinance names the Chief Administrative Officer, or the head 
of any department under his jurisdiction as designated by him, to serve as 
Records Preservation Officer. The Chief Administrative Officer delegated 
this duty to the Director of Finance and Records. 

Under provisions of the ordinance, the Records Preservation Officer 
"shall recommend to the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors a program for 
the selection and preservation of essential City and County records, shall 
advise and assist in its establishment and maintenance, and shall recommend 
the place and manner of safekeeping of essential records and preservation of 
duplicates." 

Annual Survey is Submitted : 

The Records Preservation Officer is required to submit annually to 
the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors a report containing recommendations 
as to which City and County records should be designated as essential and 
preserved against a major disaster. In addition, he It, required to report 
"on the status and progress of the records preservation program, together 
with recommendations for making such revisions as deemed necessary to keep 
the inventory of essential records current, accurate and complete." 

The latest such report submitted December 2, 1968, classified 
22,520,500 pages of City and County records as essential within the meaning 
of Administrative Code Sections 8.9-8.11. Of this total, 11,107,650 pages 
had been safeguarded by a preservation copy, either on microfilm, paper, by 
dispersal, or in a fireproof office vault. 

Safeguarding Through "Preservation" Copies : 

San Francisco, in the 1906 earthquake and fire, lost most of its 
vital records. It took many years through court actions to reconstruct 
important lost documents. Today, many important records have been safe- 
guarded through preservation copies. Included are birth, marriage and 
death records; about 95% of the important property documents; Superior Court 
judgments, decrees, wills and jury verdicts; Board of Supervisors* 
ordinances, resolutions and journals; Board of Education records; City 
Planning minutes and maps; Fire Department minutes and maps; Public Works 
engineering records; Utilities Engineering Bureau engineering records, and 
Water Department customer records. 

The list has grown rapidly in recent years as department heads have 
recognized the importance of protecting vital records, and of space savings 
made possible through use of microfilm. 

-6- 



Microfilming enables keeping in the department official copies of old 
records, rather than having them stored at the Records Center or some other 
remote location. In addition to this convenience, there is a tremendous 
saving in space, the ratio being 60 to 1. The original expense is a major 
item of consideration, and must be borne by the department having custody of 
the record. 

The cost to produce a 16 mm microfilm image is approximately 1.5tf for 
letter size paper records and about 2<? for legal size documents. The cost 
varies somewhat depending on whether the work is done by city personnel or 
by an outside contractor. 

Forty Years is "Break-even" Point : 

Records that must be kept indefinitely should be microfilmed. The 
break-even point is approximately kO years. Any paper record that must be 
kept for kO years or more can be kept more economically (not to mention more 
conveniently) in microfilm form. And duplicate preservation copies should 
be made of all essential records. Duplicate 16 mm microfilm copies can be 
made for about 1/20 per image . 

The three recommended methods for preserving essential records are: 

MICROFILM — The original document is microfilmed. A 
microfilm copy replaces the department's original copy 
for daily office reference; a second microfilm copy is 
stored in the Records Center's Underground Vault as a 
security copy. Under these conditions, the original 
paper copy usually can be destroyed, when certain 
approvals have been obtained. 

DISPERSAL — A duplicate copy (carbon, mimeograph, photo- 
copy, microfilm, etc.) is stored at a remote location. The 
duplicate copy then could be returned to the department 
in event the original is lost. 

OFFICE VAULT — If a fireproof office vault is available, 
this should provide reasonable security for essential 
records. Usually this method is used only where the 
volume of essential records is relatively small. 

As a general rule, any City and County record may be microfilmed and 
the microfilm copy substituted for the original paper copy, providing that 
one microfilm copy is made conveniently accessible to the public and a 
duplicate microfilm copy is stored in a safe and separate place for security 
purposes. There are numerous exceptions and variations to this rule, 
however. It is advisable to consult the City Attorney before initiating any 
record microfilming project. 

The Records Preservation Officer will assist in every way possible in 
the developing of records preservation program. Funds required for such 
activities must be requested by the various departments, offices, boards and 
commissions through the usual budgetary channels. Our "Inventory of Records 
Designated as Essential" follows on the next two pages. 



-7- 



INVENTORY OF RECORDS DESIGNATED A3 ESSENTIAL 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

(as of December 2, 1968) 



Department 

ADULT PROB. 

AIRPORT 

ART COMM. 

ASSESSOR 

BD. OF EDUCATION 

BD. OF SUPS. 

C.A.O. 

CITY ATTORNEY 

CITY PLANNING 

CIVIL SERVICE 

CONTROLLER 

COUNTY CLERK 

deYOUNG MUSEUM 
ELECTRICITY 
FIRE DEPT. 
HEALTH SER. SYS. 
HOUSING APPEALS 
HOUSING AUTHORITY 
JUV. PROBATION 
LEGION OF HONOR 
MUNICIPAL COURT 



Essential 

Records 

(Type) 

Minutes 

Leases 

Minutes 

Assessment Files 

Minutes, etc. 



Essential 

Records 

(Pages) 

5,^00 

4,250 

6,200 

900,000 

570,000 



Ords. & Resolutions 135,000 
Journals 210,000 



P. & A. Contracts 


1,000 


Rulings 


36,000 


Minutes , Maps 


30,500 


Minutes, Personnel 


203,000 


Fiscal, Payroll 


600,000 


Judgments 


3,620,000 


Indexes 


95,500 


Registers 


557,200 


Minutes, Inventory 


80,200 


Cable Maps 


1,000 


Minutes, Maps 


15 , 600 


Membership Records 


60,000 


Minutes 


3,000 


Minutes, Leases 


80,200 


Minutes 


4,200 


Minutes, Inventory 


^5,200 



Registers 925,000 

Indexes, Min. Books 875,000 



Safeguarded 

by 

Preservation 
Copies (Pages) 

2,200 

1,000 

1,000 

10,000 

540,000 

125,000 
205,000 





25,0C0 

10,000 

100,000 

280,000 



3,000 

1,000 

i5,4oo 

10,000 
1,000 
5,000 
1,000 

5,000 






Preservation 
Method in 
Use or 
Recommended 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Microfilm 

Microfilm 
Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Dispersal 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Microfilm 

Microfilm 
Microfilm 
Microfilm 

Office Vault 

Microfilm 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Microfilm 
Microfilm 



Department 


Essential 

Records 

(Type) 


Essential 

Records 

(Pages) 


Safeguarded 
by 

Preservation 
Copies (Pages) 


Preservation 
Method in 
Use or 

Recommended 


MUNI. RAILWAY 


Misc. Records 


7,500 




3,500 


Office Vault 


PARKING AUTH. 


Auth. Minutes 


54,200 




5,000 


Office Vault 


POLICE DEPT. 


Commission Minutes 


72,500 




10,000 


Office Vault 


PUBLIC ADMIN. 


Active Case Records 


8,coo 




8,000 


Office Vault 


PUBLIC HEALTH 


Birth Records 
Death Records 
Other 
Disinterments 


1,895,000 

1,640,000 
100,000 

60,000 


1, 
1, 


,950,000 

,640,000 

15,000 
60,000 


Dispersal 
Dispersal 
Microfilm 
Microfilm 


PUBLIC LIBRARY 


Commission iiinutes 


3,300 







Office Vault 


PUBLIC WORKS 


DPW Minutes 
Engineering Records 
Sewer Main Maps 
Other Maps 


280,000 

75,000 

1,000 
1,000 





40,000 

500 
500 


Office Vault 
Microfilm 
Microfilm 
Microfilm 


P.U.C. 


Minutes 


48,000 







Office Vault 


PURCHASER 


Contracts 
Equipment Inventory 


3,000 

18,500 





n 


Office Vault 
Office Vault 


REaL ESTATE 


Property Records 


6o,oo<~ 




5,000 


Office Vault 


RECORDER 


Property Records 
Marriage Licenses 


6,825,200 
613,550 


4, 


,800,000 
613,550 


Microfilm 
Dispersal 


REC.-PARK 


Commission Minutes 


5,500 




3,000 


Office Vault 


REDEVELOPMENT 


Minutes, Contracts 


10,500 




1,000 


Office Vault 


RETIREM'T SYS. 


Membership Records 


960,000 







Microfilm 


SHERIFF 


Inmate Records 


9,000 




4,000 


Office Vault 


U.E.B. (PUC) 


Engineering Records 


560,000 




525,000 


Microfilm 


WAR MEMORIAL 


Minutes 


21,500 




2,000 


Office Vault 


WATER DEPT. 


Customer Records 


106,000 




75,000 


Office Vault 


WELFhRE 


Minutes 
TOTALS 


18,800 




6,000 


Office Vault 




22,520,500 


11 


,107,650 





; 12,282 


12,399 


12,420 


3,796 


3,807 


3,997 


2,767 


3,158 


3,275 


i 3.141 


3,456 


3,420 


1,332 


814 


571 


202 


280 


161 


7,713 


7,917 


8,505 



COUNTY CLERK 
1968-69 

The County Clerk's office serves as the ministerial arm and 
office of record of the Superior Court of the City and County of San 
Francisco. In addition, certain statutory indices are maintained; 
the principal ones are the Corporation index, the Partnerships and 
Fictitious N^mes Index, and the index of Notaries Public. Carriage 
licenses are issued by this department. Branch offices are located 
at the Hall of Justice, the Youth Guidance Center, and at San Francisco 
General Hospital. 

3 Year Summary Comparison 1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Superior Court Proceedings: 
Civil actions and petitions 
Probate petitions 
Criminal actions 
Juv. petns. no. of children 
Psychiatric petitions 
Appeals to Superior Court 
, Marriage licenses issued 

Detailed operations of the various divisions of the County Clerk's 
Office are shown below: 

Cashier's Division 

The revenue from fees collected in 1968-69 was $283,543. A 
comparative statement of fee revenue follows: 

1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Probate Department $37,098 $83,655 $88,901 

General Department 129,897 132,669 136,058 

Civil Department 49,272 52,597 49,643 

Marriage License Dept. * 7,713 7.917 8,505 

Professional Registrations 404 380 436 

Total Office Fees $274,384 $277,218 $283,543 

♦Marriage License and Professional Registration Fees 
are now collected by the Recorder's Office. 

Fines, Law Library Fees and 

Collections for Other Departments : 1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Juvenile Court Fines 
Juvenile Court Traffic Fines 
Crim. Dept. Fines & Forfeitures 
Peace Officers Training Fund 
Payments to State Dept. Pub. Health 

(sec. 26859 Govt. Code) 
Law Library Fees 68,436 76,661 102,702 

-10- 



$ 475 


wm 


_ 


12,161 


$12,741 


$12,323 


81,271 


47,717 


58,559 


7,929 


6,478 


8,216 


5,586 


4.396 


4,122 



CASHIER °S DIVISION (Continued) 

Fines, Law Library Fees and 

Collections for Other Departments : 1 966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Sup. Ct. Reporters Salary Fund £227,156 $23^,201 -$231,280 

Total Fees and Fines Collected $677,398 $659,412 $700,745 

Trust Fund Deposits: 
Civil Court Deposits & Jury Fees 1,141,025 l,748,0i>4 5,653,893 
Criminal Bail Deposits, Cash & Bonds 16,562 40,036 86,525 

Total Money Collected $1,834,985 $2,447,492 $5,740,418 

GENERAL DIVISION 

New Civil actions filed during the past fiscal year totaled 12,420 
compared with 12,399 in 1967-68. A breakdown of other filings follows: 

1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Civil Actions 12,282 

Adoptions 354 

Certificates of Incorporation 880 

Cts.of Copartnership & Fie. Names 942 

Official and Notarial Bonds 1,120 

Oaths of Office 1,664 

The following is a classification by character of civil actions filed. 

1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

♦Personal Injury Cases 

By Hotor Vehicles 
Others 
Divorce 
Annulment 

Separate Ilaintenance 
**A11 Other Actions 

Totals 12,282 12,399 12,420 

♦First Reporting 
♦♦Adjusted Figures to Compensate for Change in Reporting. 

CIVIL DIVISION 



12,399 


12,420 


445 


355 


811 


1,223 


894 


1,149 


1,043 


1.325 


550 


477 





2,559 


2,733 


- 


1,634 


1,671 


3,133 


3,278 


3,378 


440 


513 


507 


181 


227 


191 


♦♦8,478 


4,188 


3,940 



Disposition of Civil Actions: 
Judgts. by Jury on Verdict 
Judgts. Misc. after Ct. Hearings 
Judgts. on Default 
Dismissals by Parties 



1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 



331 


315 


289 


4,262 


4,352 


3,364 


123 


66 


58 


3,844 


4,060 


3,438 



-11- 



CIVIL DIVISION (Continued) 



Disposition of Civil Actions: 
Trsfrd.to other Jurisdictions 
Sep. Maint. Judgts. Grtd. 
Annulments of Marriage Grtd. 
Interloc. Decrees of Div. Grtd. 
Final Decrees of Div. Grtd. 



1966-67 



1967-68 



1968-69 



280 


287 


344 


25 


27 


24 


377 


393 


348 


2,386 


2,740 


2.465 


2,323 


2,155 


2,374 



Appeals to District and Supreme 
Courts from Superior Court 

Appeals Disposed of: 
Affirmed 
Modified 
Reversed 
Dismissed 



298 



326 



280 



34 


40 


59 


3 


3 


3 


15 


31 


54 


48 


53 


66 



PROBATE DIVISION 



New Estate and guardianship proceedings totaled 3i997 compared with 
3,807 for the previous fiscal year. 



1966-67 



1967-68 



1968-69 



Probate Proceedings Filed: 








Testate 


2,035 


2,028 


2,070 


Intestate 


1.135 


1,091 


1,187 


Missing Persons 


3 


4 


2 


Guardianship Proceedings Filed: 








Minor 


166 


205 


196 


Incompetent 


340 


272 


252 


Conservator 


217 


207 


290 


Letters Issued: 








Testamentary 


1,780 


1,779 


1,816 


Administration 


888 


780 


954 


Administration with Will Annexed 


320 


289 


320 


Special 


167 


163 


149 


Guardianship 


510 


428 


482 


Conservator 


251 


229 


293 


CRIMINAL DIVI 


SI0N 







Four Courts hear criminal matters daily at the Hall of Justice. 
Statistics below are based on number of defendants: 



1966-67 



1967-68 



1968-69 



New Actions Filed: 
Informations 



2,767 
2,182 



3,158 
2,417 



3,275 
2,553 



-12- 



CRIMINAL DIVISION (Continued) 

1966-67 1967-68 



1968-69 



New Actions Filed, (Cont'd) 
Indictments 

Cert, from Muni. Ct. for Judgt. 
Cert, from Muni. Ct. for Hearing on 

Sexual Psychopathy 
Pets, for Cert, of Rehabilitation 
Cert, from Muni. Ct. for Hearing on 

Present Sanity 
Cert, from Muni. Ct. to Determine 

Narcotic Addiction 
Petitions for . frits of Habeas Corpus 

Disposition of C-^ses: 
Convicted after Pleas of Nolo 

Contendere 
Convicted after Pleas of Guilty 
Convicted after Court Trials 
Convicted after Jury Trials 
Dismissed 

Transferred to other Jurisdictions 
Acquitted after Court Trials 
Acquitted after Jury Trials 
Sentenced to County Jail 
Sentenced to State Prison 
Sentenced by Fines 
Committed to Youth Authority 
Committed as Sexual Psychopaths 
Committed as Insane 
Prob.Grtd. , incl. Conditional Prob. 
Certs, of Rehabilitation Granted 
Committed re: Narcotic Addiction 

Fines and Bail Forfeitures Collected: 
Fines and Assessments 
Bail Forfeitures 

Appeals to State Appellate C )urt 
Pending at Beginning of Year 
Filed During the Year 

Disposition of Appeals: 
Affirmed 
Reversed 
Dismissed 
Pending 
Modified 

Coroner's Transcripts Filed 



354 


354 


252 


43 


23 


25 


6 


8 


7 


3 


9 


10 


100 


205 


281 


6 


17 


39 


73 


128 


79 


44 


27 


34 


1,451 


1,898 


2,146 


313 


305 


323 


116 


124 


64 


359 


378 


324 


20 


35 


29 


128 


168 


221 


28 


21 


12 


234 


142 


127 


241 


272 


184 


6 


5 


10 


61 


92 


80 


10 


15 


7 


61 


100 


126 


1,207 


1,636 


1,389 


4 


9 


7 


119 


103 


160 


$51,303 


$43,098 


$47,949 


39,600 


29,851 


23,400 


128 


158 


150 


148 


121 


99 


56 


57 


60 


6 


3 


10 


50 


60 


40 


158 


150 


138 


6 


4 


1 



186 



369 



430 



-13- 



JUVENILE COURT DIVISION 

The Juvenile Court meets every week day at the Youth Guidance 
Center, 375 -foodside Avenue, San Francisco. Statistics follow: 

1966.67 1967-68 1968-69 



Petitions Filed: 










Ptns. for Coram, of Dep 


sndent 








Children 




462 


383 


389 


Number of Children 




783 


591 


712 


Ptns. Filed on Delinqu 


snt 








Children 




2.358 


2,865 


2,708 


Number of Children 




2.358 


2,865 


2,708 


Hearings by the Court: 










Detention 




2,753 


2,784 


2,901 


Special 




369 


224 


421 


Abandonments 




46 


47 


28 



Number of records sealed 119 209 241 

Juvenile Traffic Hearings : 

Moving violations 5,074 5.658 4,172 

Fines collected $12,031 $12,185 $12,236 

STATE HOSPITAL COURT DIVISION 

The State Hospital Court meets at 2:00 P.M. every week day at San 
Francisco General Hospital, 2450 Twenty-second Street. The Court Clerk is 
in attendance from 8 A.M. to 5 P.M. Monday through Friday. 



1966-67 1967-68 1963-69 



Alleged Insane Persons: 
Examinations 

Committed to State Hospitals 
Examined and Discharged 

Intemperance and Use of Drugs: 
Examinations 

Committed to State Hospitals 
Examined and Discharged 

Feeble Minded: 
Examinations 
Comm. to Homes for Feeble Minded 



1,130 


680 


519 


221 


122 


94 


909 


558 


425 


179 


127 


49 


13 


6 


3 


166 


121 


46 


23 


7 


3 


d 22 


7 


3 



-Ik- 



APPELLATE DIVISION 



Three judges of the San Francisco Superior Court, appointed by the 
Judicial Council, sit each Friday morning as the Appellate Department of 
the Superior Court. Appeals from the Municipal Court, Criminal and Civil, 
are heard by the Appellate Division. Appeals from the Small Claims Court 
are retried from the beginning. 



1966-67 



1967-68 1968-69 



Civil Appeals from Muni Court 
Filed During the Year: 



5^ 



91 



69 



Disposition of Appeals: 
Affirmed 
Modified 
Reversed 
Dismissed 
Rehearings Denied 
Under Submission or Pending 



32 


53 


tf> 











9 


26 


11 


13 


19 


15 


k 


10 


9 


16 


26 


25 



Criminal Appeals from Muni Court 
Filed During the Year: 



102 



137 



92 



Disposition of Appeals: 
Affirmed 
Reversed 
Dismissed 
Pending 
Abandoned 

Appeals from Small Claims Court 

Disposition of Small Claims Appeals 
Affirmed 
Reversed 
Dismissed 
Under Submission or Pending 



16 


72 


20 


2 


3 


10 


75 


^5 


70 


8 


21 


13 


1 


k 


1 



54 



52 



58 



38 


42 


36 


12 


2 


7 


i* 


7 


15 


9 


5 


10 



LICENSE DIVISION 

Marriage Licenses issued in I968-69 totaled 8,505# 588 more than 
the previous fiscal year. There were 2,37^ decrees of divorce entered, 
or 219 more than in 1967-68. 

1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 



Marriage Licenses Issued 
Professional Registrations 



7.713 
202 



7,917 
190 



8,505 
218 



-15- 



RECORDER 
1968-69 

The Recorder's Office, as required b/ law, receives for recording 
all papers or notices that may legally be recorded, makes and keeps a 
true copy of the original, indexes the same, and arranges the books of 
record and indices in suitable places to facilitate their inspection. 

A program for microfilming old record books dating back to the 
1906 earthquake and fire, which program was begun in 1960-61, was 
concluded at the end of June 1969. A total of 9,904 books was micro- 
filmed, A few books were not microfilmed, since their contents are of 
such a nature that they are seldom if ever referred to. It was felt 
that it would be a waste of time and money to copy these. 

In the Recorder's budget for 1969-70, $1700 was appropriated for the 
purchase of a microfilm reader-printer. It was planned to remove one 
of the large Photostat machines and substitute this much smaller machine, 
which will make copies from roll film or acetate jackets, either positive 
or negative. In June of 1969, it was discovered that by transferring some 
unused funds, a reader-printer could be purchased from 1968-69 funds, 
opening the way for disposal of both Photostat machines, making available 
for use a considerable amount of floor space. In order to accomplish 
this, it is planned to rent a Xerox copier to make copies of marriage 
records which are negative originals and are not on microfilm. By 
transferring the unused $1700 in the l?69-70 budget to pay for the 
installation of a separate electrical circuit which the Xerox machine 
requires, and the rental fees for the copier for the ensuing year, this 
purpose could be accomplished. 

Receipts 

1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Recording Fees $153,824.00 $159,659.20 $157,547.80 

Special Service fees 12,497.25 11,612.40 12,598,05 
Marriage certificate recording 

fees 7,812.00 31,668.00 34,204.00 

Real Property Transfer Tax - 208,266.85 413,401.80 

$174,133.25 $411,206.45 $617,751.65 

The increase in marriage certificate fees in 1967-68 was not due 
to any great increase in the number of certificates recorded. The fee 
now includes an additional $3 for each certificate, which is credited to 
a property tax reduction fund. 

Expenditures 

1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Salaries $179,785.56 $179,157.90 $192,290.73 

Other 24,838.45 19,200.00 16,333.36 

$204,624.01 $198,357.90 $208,629.09 
Excess, receipts over 

expenditures - $30,490.76 $212,848.55 $409,122.56 



-16- 



Receipts listed do not include desk rental fees collected last 
fiscal year by the Real Estate Department for desk space in the Recorder's 
office used by title companies, record searchers, etc. Neither do they 
include $13,914.40 estimated work for 3,636 papers (5,759 pages) of 
"•official ■ or free recordings; that is, the service rendered to war 
veterans, dependents of war veterans, compensation and pension claims, 
old age pension claims and miscellaneous Federal, State or other 
political subdivision recordings; which service is required by State 
law to be performed without fees. 

An additional $250 could be added for other free work performed 
as a courtesy to other City and County departments. 

The monthly breakdown of recording and filing fees follows: 

1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 



July 


$14,285.15 


^16,433.50 


C-17,479.25 


August 


15,^28.50 


19,329.25 


13,130.30 


September 


13,131.95 


15,122.20 


15,412.20 


October 


13,541.55 


16,894.95 


18,106.70 


November 


12,906.15 


17,357.30 


16,366.45 


December 


13,449.90 


16,733.95 


17,020.40 


January 


12,955.35 


16,262.65 


16,192.50 


February 


13,253.20 


15,403.55 


14,985.75 


March 


17,268.90 


17,692.10 


16,272.60 


April 


14,796.95 


17,705.00 


18,588.10 


May 


16,148.50 


17,838.15 


17,001.20 


June 


16,967.15 


16,167.00 


18,793.90 




$174,133.25 


$202,939.60 


$204,349.85 



Beginning January 1, 1968, the Recorder's office assumed its new 
duties of collecting the Real Property Transfer Tax imposed upon 
transfers of real property in San Francisco by Ordinance No. 315-67. 
It was estimated that this new tax would mean added revenue of about 
$400,000.00 per year. The figures below, for the first complete fiscal 
year, show that this estimate was not too optimistic: 

July 1968 $34,674.35 

August 33,108.10 

September 28,024.20 

October 32,900.15 

November 29,050.65 

December 43,556.10 

January I969 33,44-0.10 

February 23,692.10 

March 37,780.25 

April 38,838.60 

May 40,100.50 

June 33.236.70 

TOTAL $413,401.80 



-17- 



Documents Filed and Recorded 

The following are the principal classifications of the 78,924 
documents filed and recorded during 1968-69. For comparative purposes, 
lists for the two preceding fiscal years are included: 



1966.67 1967-68 1968-69 



Affidavits of death 

Agreements 

Decrees 

Deeds 

Deeds of Trust & Mortgages 

Abstracts of Judgments 

Miscellaneous 

Military Discharges 

Uniform Com. Code Filings 

Notices of Default 

Reconveyances 

Tax Liens - Federal 



1,286 


1,363 


1,420 


279 


133 


493 


859 


907 


1,029 


11,210 


11,863 


11,962 


10,606 


11,732 


11,419 


3,578 


3,358 


2,610 


31.383 


30,691 


30.361 


348 


331 


315 


6,637 


6,771 


6,874 


1,574 


1,292 


1,098 


9,405 


10,194 


9,507 


1,520 


1,521 


1,836 



78,685 80,156 78,924 



The figures below show recordings of deeds, deeds of trust and 
mortgages for the past 10 years: 







Deeds of Trust and 


Fiscal Year 


Deeds 
17,350 


Mortgages 


1959-60 


17,454 


1960-61 


17,147 


19,235 


1961-62 


18,680 


22,490 


1962-63 


19,707 


24,761 


1963-64 


18,379 


22,956 


1964-65 


18,390 


23,032 


1965-66 


14,877 


17,822 


1966-67 


11,210 


10,606 


1967-68 


11,863 


11,732 


1968-69 


11,962 


11,419 



The following table lists the number of marriage certificates 
recorded in San Francisco since 1949-50: 



1949-50 


7,397 


1959-60 


6,629 


1950-51 


8,195 


1960-61 


6,538 


1951-52 


7,220 


1961-62 


6,602 


1952-53 


7,359 


1962-63 


6,786 


1953-54 


6,711 


1963-64 


7.215 


1954-55 


6,686 


1964-65 


7.160 


1955-56 


6,526 


1965-66 


7,377 


1956-57 


6,895 


1966-67 


7,793 


1957-58 


6,502 


1967-68 


7,837 


1958-59 


6,595 


1968-69 


8,311 



-18- 



ANNUAL REPORT 

DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Fiscal Year 1968-69 



The office of the Department of Weights and Measures of 
San Francisco has been in the City Hall since its construction 
and continues to be staffed by one Sealer, one Senior 
Inspector, six Inspectors, and one Senior Clerk Typist, 
whose duties are the enforcement of State and Federal laws 
and regulations and to educate and assist consumers, 
merchants, and producers. 

National Bureau of Standards: Handbook 82, Weights and 
Measures Administration, 1962, p. 2. states: 

"The importance to a community of adequate weights and 
measures administration can scarcely be overestimated. Next 
to the personal health and safety of the people , one of the 
most important of the fundamental obligations of the state 
or municipality to its citizens is this of the regulation of 
commercial weighing and measuring instruments .... There 
is no single individual in a community whose interests are 
not affected by these considerations, for weighing and 
measuring operations enter . . . into the distribution of 
all of the necessaries of life, particularly of food and 
fuel. Furthermore, an important consideration in this 
connection is that in the case of the less prosperous 
members of a community, whose purchases are necessarily made 
in the smallest quantities and most frequently, this 
interest is a vital one." 

Traditionally the role of the weights and measures 
official has been precisely defined: "The primary function 
of the weights and measures official is to see that equity 
prevails in all commercial transactions involving the 
determinations of quantity." Yet, the weights and measures 



-19- 



official has for a long time performed various duties 
beyond those statutorily required of him, the most notable 
of which has probably been his role in educating the 
consumer. In fact, it may be correctly said that the 
weights and measures official has long been engaged in the 
field of consumer protection. 

However, with the increase in the volume of pre- 
packaged goods, the mushroom growth of credit facilities, 
mail order firms and others, it has been the determination 
of quality rather than of quantity, the detection of mis- 
leading advertising rather than of giving short measure, 
that has seemingly become of prime importance in the field of 
consumer protection. As a result, the extent of the 
responsibilities of the weights and measures official, 
in this continually changing and expanding field, has 
become somewhat va.gue . Few attempts have yet bvien made to 
define his new role, and to coordinate his activities with 
those of other consumer protection agencies until very 
recently. 

Change in weights and measures enforcement in the 
past twenty years has kept pace with, or possibly has 
antedated, general marketing progress in the United States. 

In earlier times, retail sales were largely made in 
the presence of both the buyer and the seller and made from 
bulk to retail size, thus offering an opportunity for 
personal observance and control. 'This is no longer the 
manner in which retail sales of foods and almost all 
common household articles are made. In a supermarket, 
approximately 10,000 products and sizes of products are 
now displayed, all of which bear a quantity declaration 
which a consum r must accept as correct, with no other 
assurance than the knowledge that './eights and Measures 
Departments, equipped with modern equipment and staffed 
by trained inspectors are continuously on the alert to 
protect his interests. 



-20- 



The complexity of modern control now requires a 
constant study and review of such diversified equipment 
as taximeters, odometers, gasoline dispensing pumps, 
electric meters, water meters, devices to control 
cryogenics, liquid petroleum gas, vehicle measures, fabric, 
cordage and wire measuring devices, and assorted meters, 
all of which are regulated by California Codes. 

A new responsibility is implementation of the "U. S. 
Fair Packaging and Labeling Act", which requires not only 
the accurate statement of quantity, but the type, size, 
positioning, and other information on the label of each 
consumer commodity. 

The next problem on the horizon is the increasing 
demand for improvement in consumer protection and better 
communication with the general public. 

The great majority of complaints received by this 
office, while not alleging or containing facts indicating 
direct fraud, do contain legitimate gripes and elements of 
unfair dealings against consumers. Many are the results 
of lack of communication between consumer and store or 
service personnel. As a result, we have endeavored to 
establish liaison with the consumer or customer service- 
departments maintained by business concerns so that 
consumer complaints may be properly channelled and dis- 
posed of. 

It is also a fallacy to believe that consumer and 
business interests must of necessity conflict. Nothing 
could be further from the truth. Programs gauged for the 
protection of the consumer also serve as protection for 
the honest and ethical businessman. If a product or 
service is falsely advertised it is not only the consumer 
who is hurt, but also the honest businessman who has lost 
those hard-earned consumer dollars. If premium gasoline 
is adulterated and sold at a lower price, the unaware 
consumer is cheated and the honest gasoline service 



-21- 



station operator loses custoners. If excessive fat is 
contained in chopped neat or a merchant short-weights 
merchandise, the loss is sustained by both the consumer 
and the honest businessman. 

Not all complaints received by this office are from 
consumers, complaints also emanate fron businessmen, who 
often are the first to suffer fron the effects of a 
consumer fraud. This office seeks to pronote "Consumer 
Protection" - but the end result is protection of all 
the connunity and a goal of honesty and fairness in the 
marketplace. 

In the belief that the department has successfully 
accomplished its duty for this yoer, we attach a 
statistical summary of the work performed 



-22- 



During the 1968-69 Fiscal Year there were 81 
complaints received and. adjusted by our Inspectors 
and 31 "Orders to Conform" were issued. A total of 
1,117,651 packages was inspected, of which 31,176 were 
found to be "Short Weight". 



Scales: 



Sealed Adjust. Condemn. Confis 



Counter 2,062 372 169 8 

Spring 2,432 241 40 

Computing 5,478 553 90 1 

Heavy Capacity 2,677 504 233 

Person Weighers 72 27 5 

Prescription (Drugs) 715 13 

Weights : 

Drug 
Commercial 

Measures : 

Retail Pumps 
Grease Meters ) 
Lube Oil Meters) 
Yardage Meters 
Liquid Measures 
Wholesale Meters 
Taximeters 

COMPARISON OF WORKLOAD FACTORS 

1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Certificates Issued 14,185 15,261 13,077 

Scales Tested 19,719 16,455 13,728 

Weights Inspected 25,460 21,052 23,647 

Gas Pumps Inspected 5,356 5,437 5,158 

Other Measuring Devices 4,218 2,798 2,094 
Containers Inspected 1,657,353 1,124,927 1,117,651 

Miscellaneous Calls 2,000 1,570 1,454 



24,519 
10,766 



376 


4,879 


35 


317 


1 


170 

1,773 

7 

116 


2 

3 


26 









47 





344 





13 











2 











72 






-23- 



COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
AGRICULTURAL COMMISSIONER 

ANNUAL REPORT 
1968 - 1969 

The San Francisco County Department of Agriculture is a branch of the City 
and County government. It is responsible for the enforcement of all State laws, 
rules and regulations pertaining to the office of the County Agricultural Commis- 
sioner and such other work as is prescribed by the Chief Administrative Officer. 

The general purposes and responsibilities of this department include the fol- 
lowing : 

To promote and protect the agricultural industry. 

To protect and benefit both the grower and the consumer by enforcing 
the provisions of the Agricultural Code. 

Within the authority delegated to us, to promote and protect the health 
and welfare of our citizens. 

In order to provide uniformity of enforcement throughout the various counties 
of California, many of the functions are performed under the supervision of the 
California State Deirector of Agriculture. 

The California Agricultural Code, from which this office derives its author- 
ity, became effective on August 21, 1933, when all laws pertaining to agriculture 
were removed from other codes and consolidated into one code. 

The origin of the County Department of Agriculture dates back to the year 
I08I when the California State Legislature first authorized the appointment of County 
Boards of Horticultural Commissioners entitled: "An Act to Protect and Promote the 
Horticultural Interests of the State." 

In 1909» the California State Legislature amended the act providing for the 
elimination of the thr-ee-man-board and setting up a single Horticultural Commissioner. 

As the work continued to broaden, the name was changed In 1931 to "Agricul- 
tural Commissioner." In 1937, the term "County Department of Agriculture" was desig- 
nated as the official name of the department with the Agricultural Commissioner in 
charge . 

This department inspects fruits, vegetables, eggs, nuts, honey, poultry and 
rabbit meats in wholesale and retail establishments, Inspections are made of nurser- 
ies, seed firms, apiaries, pos't offices, express and freight terminals in order to 
detect plant diseases and insect pests and to enforce the plant quarantine require- 
ments. This department certifies agricultural products being exported to foreign 
countries so that the requirements of "Freedom from Pests & Diseases" can be met. 

V/e also conduct pest surveys and maintain various insect traps, including 
"Residential Grid Detection," where one block is thoroughly checked at every 1/2 
mile interval. It is a survey specifically designed to detect, with a minimum of 
manpower expenditure, pests before they become established in an area. With the 
great increase and speed of travel, the danger of introducing new pests becomes more 
acute. Introductions are most apt to occur in urban areas. 

-2k- 



San Francisco County has 2 farms that produce vegetables on appro xi mate ly 5 
acres; and 12 grower nurseries that produce potted plants and cut flowers in 827,000 
square feet of glasshouses, with a total gross value of $ 711,361. 

Revenue From Two Sources : 

Revenue received in 1968-69, consisted of $3,300.00 from the State to augment 
the salary of the San Francisco Agricultural Commissioner; and $4, 268. 00 export 
certification fees, 

In addition to the duties listed above, the Chief Administrative Officer has 
delegated to the Agricultural Commissioner the supervision of the Farmers' Market, 
including its functions and personnels 

Following is a comparison breakdown of inspection services provided: 



PLANT QUARANTINE 

All shipments of nursery stock and plants, plant products including fruit, 
seed and grain, used agricultural implements and appliances; are required to be held 
for inspection upon first arrival in the county. This requirement is to prevent the 
entry of plant diseases, insects, noxious weeds or seeds, which may be detrimental to 
agriculture. The post office, railway express, freight yards and commercial trucking 
concerns are visited daily for this inspection. In addition, many plants are in- 
spected at nurseries. 

In many cases treatment can be applied to plants rejected, thus insuring 
cleanliness; and the commodities may then be released. 



Plant Quarantine : 

Number of Premises 
Shipments Inspected 
Plants Inspected 
Plants Rejected 
Total Man Hours 



1966-67 



1967-68 



1968-69 



240 


240 


240 


8,576 


12,842 


19,817 


10,285,382 


10,464,177 


14,287,731 


8,169 


17,760 


121,979 


l,482 1 / 2 


1, 7^/2 


l,604 1 /a 


STANDARDIZATION 





This is one of the major functions of this department. It relates to the in- 
spection of fruits, nuts, vegetables, eggs, poultry meat, and honey, at the wholesale 
produce terminal, retail stores, and any other place where produce is offered for 
sale. This is to insure the enforcement of the requirements governing the quality, 
packing and marketing of these products. We inspect and certify loads of commodities 
moving interstate or intrastate; and to foreign countries when requested by shippers, 
to show compliance with California's standardization requirements. 



Wholesale Produce Market 



1966-67 



1967-68 



1968-69 



Number of Premises 


47 


47 


47 


Premises Inspected 


11,^30 


11,295 


11,430 


Rejection Tags 


1,006 


898 


846 


Packages Rejected 


56,825 


55,536 


50,204 


Packages Inspected 


6,784,254 


7,136,574 


7,399,767 



-25- 



STANDARDIZATION - continued 



Retail Stores : 



1966-67 



1967-68 



1968-69 



Number of Premises 


2,142 


2,145 


2,142 


Premises Inspected 


2,505 


1,616 


1,726 


Rejection Tags 


257 


254 


158 


Packages Rejected 


1,431 


2,778 


1,607 


Packages Inspected 


244,556 


214,687 


215,655 


Farmers ' Market : 








Number of Premises 


45 


45 


45 


Premises Inspected 


12,950 


15,800 


12,750 


Rejection Tags 


18 


20 


5 


Packages Rejected 


502 


1,069 


64 


Packages Inspected 


146,698 


145,777 


141,862 


Total Kan Hours for all Produce 


5,59^/a 


5,226 


5,544 


Inspection 








Wholesale Eggs : 








Number of Premises 


19 


17 


15 


Premises Inspected 


649 


607 


464 


Dozens Rejected 


158,150 


235,550 


195,296 


Dozens Inspected 


848,952 


949,492 


815,540 


Retail Eggs: 








Number of Premises 


2,155 


2,155 


2,157 


Premises Inspected 


2,6ll 


1,905 


1,946 


Dozens Rejected 


105,702 


126,960 


105,669 


Dozens Inspected 


790,259 


676,060 


646,165 



Total Man Hours for Wholesale 
& Retail Egg Inspection 



5,648 



5,515 



2,755% 



Poultry Meat 



Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 


950 

1,688 

2,098 

160,192 


951 
1,522 

2,560 
185,679 


951 
1,445. 
1,850 
140, 055 


Total Man Hours - Poultry 


524 


558 


591 


Honey : 








Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 


2,148 

1,795 

561 

175,546 


2,150 

1,551 

1,055 

148,751 


2,150 

1,665 

126 

164,268 


Total Man Hours - Honey 


499% 


525 


545 1 /z 


TOTAL MAN HOURS FOR ALL 
STANDARDIZATION 


10,066 


7,529 


8,854 



-26- 



182 


180 


178 


199 


2*tl 


290 


508 1 /2 


**75 


327% 



NURSERY INSPECTION 

All nurseries within the county are inspected at periodical intervals for 
the presence of pests, and for compliance with Grades and Standards. If serious 
pests are found, eradication measures must be taken immediately by the nursery. 
All plants must be correctly labeled with the botanical name, 

1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Number of Nurseries 
Premises Inspected 
Total Man Hours 

SEED INSPE C TION 

This involves the inspection and sampling of agricultural and vegetable 
seed lots at wholesale and retail locations for proper labeling as to germination. 

1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Number of Premises lA-0 1^2 1^5 

Premises Inspected 190 156 175 

Total Plan Hours 236/2 235 210 



EXPORT CERTIFICATION 

This is the inspection of fruits and vegetables going to foreign countries, 
and is done to insure the plant quarantine and standardization requirements of 
those countries. A fee is charged for this work. 

1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Certificates Issued 1,705 1,685 1,^32 

Packages Inspected 267, 3^+ 222,^81 19^,610 



DISPOSAL ORDERS ISSUED AT WHOLESALE PRODUCE TERMINAL 

Disposal orders are issued for produce that has been rejected, or has been 
on hand too long. It is not salvageable. 

1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Disposal Orders Issued 1,530 1,992 1,636 

Number of Packages ^3,283 51,920 289,363 



-27- 



PSST SURVEYS AKD PS3T CONTROLS 



Detection surveys are important for determining the possible presence of 
nev; nr.d dangerous agricultural pests. If pests can be discovered before they 
become too widely distributed, then there is a greater possibility of eradication. 

Agricultural pest control operators are licensed by the State Department 
of Agriculture. They must register with the Commissioner of the county in which the 
work is to be done. 

State regulations specify conditions of workmanship, and the precautions in 
application under direction of the Agricultural Commissioner. 



Number of Fruit Fly Traps 

Number of Japanese Beetle 

Residential Grid Detection 

Registered Pest Control 
Operators 

Permits Issued for Use of 
Injurious Herbicides 

Permits Issued for Use of 
Injurious Materials 



Total Man Hours 250 286 1 / 2 520 



RELATED FUNCTIONS 

This includes the other varied activities such as giving garden advice to 
home owners, the gathering of crop statistics, certifying official fumigation 
chambers, and performing general public relations work. 



166-67 


1967-68 
36 


1968-69 


30 


32 


15 


30 


31 


- 


213 


371 


13 


14 


Ik 


17 


16 


15 


k 


6 


1 



************** 



-28- 



SAN FRANCISCO FARMERS ' MARKET 

Annual Report 
1968-1969 



The San Francisco Farmers' Market opened on ^ugust 12, 19^3> during the 
wartime as an outlet for surplus and distressed crops from the neighboring 
counties. Its first location was at Market Street and Duboce avenue, and was 
operated by the farmers themselves. The City and County assumed management 
on .-iUgust 1st, 19 Mf. The Farmers' Market opened at its present location, at 
100 Alemany Boulevard, on ^ugust *t, 19^7 1 under a City Ordinance which author- 
izes the Chief Administrative Officer to establish a Farmers' Market to be 
administered by him or by any department under his jurisdiction. It is now 
under the supervision of the County agricultural Commissioner who reports to 
the Chief administrative Officer through the >.irector of Finance and Records. 

The Farmers' Market Ordinance requires that fees charged shall be suffi- 
cient to pay the operating and maintenance costs of the Market, and in 
addition, to repay the City and County within a reasonable period, any capital 
improvements at the Market. As of June 30, I969, 3325,893.09 had been repaid 
to the City. This is $67, 216.0^ in excess of the cost of the land and capital 
improvements at the Farmers' Market, which amounted to 5256,677.05. 



3<-.LE3 PROMOTION: 



Sales at the Market are promoted through news releases to newspapers and 
radio and television stations, and other outlets. We also mail growers cer- 
tificates and news information about the Market to all growers who have used 
the Market in recent years. Informational letters concerning the Market are 
sent to all county agricultural commissioners. 



The Market operates on a five day week, Tuesday through Saturday, from 
7:00 a. m. to 6:00 p.m. 



The Market celebrated its Twenty-fifth .mniversary on August 12th, 1968. 



-29- 



On August 17, 1968, during Farmers' Market 25th Anniversary Week, Mayor Joseph 
Alioto came to the Market and presented awards for best decorated stalls: 

First Prize: A 9" Silver Compote Dish, awarded to - 

PRIMO HULLANA of Merced County 

Stalls 74 & 76 
Mrs. Effie Augustin, Saleslady 

Second Prize: A 6" Silver Compote Dish, awarded to - 

A. M. NIELSEN of Fresno County 

Stalls 53 & 55 
Mrs, Herminia Ascano, Saleslady 

Mayor Alioto also crowned the State Watermelon-Eating Champion: 

Mario Soriano, 15 years old 
( father r Mr. Carlos Soriano) 
421-A South Van Ness Avenue 
Member of Columbia Park Boys ' Club 

Music was provided by the San Francisco Municipal Band and dancing was pro- 
vided by many of the dancing clubs of San Francisco presenting folk dancing 
and wearing colorful costumes. A very successful and entertaining day was 
enjoyed by the many thousands of visitors and customers who came to the Mar- 
ket to help us celebrate our 25th anniversary. 



The breakdown below summarizes the Farmers' Market Capital Expenditures 
Program as of June 50, 1969. The City and County of San Francisco has been 
reimbursed for capital expenditures through the excess revenue each year. 

Capital Expenditures : (Adjusted to agree with Controller's figures 1963-64) 

Land 3 53,032.15 

Improvements 205,644.90 

Total ... t 253,677.05 



Revenue and Operating Expenses : 

Revenues 783,3l8.8l 

Less Operating Expenses . . 457,425.72 



525,893.09 



Excess of Net Revenues Over 

Capital Expenditures ... 3 67,216.04 

-30- 



RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE FARMERS' MARKET: 



The following projects are necessary for the proper maintenance of the 
Farmers ' Market : 



The interior of the administration building needs painting 
to maintain the appearance of the office, conference room, 
supply room and rest rooms. Painting will also prevent 
deterioration of the walls and woodwork. 



2. Post holes and the use of removable posts at each end of 
the main drive would aid in the safe control of traffic 
when it is expedient to close the main drive to traffic. 
These posts would also safely prevent motorists from using 
the main drive when the Market is closed for business. 



3. Repair cyclone fence: The cyclone fence which prevents 
people from entering the Market at other than proper en- 
trances, is damaged. The cyclone fence and the fence posts 
do need repair to keep the Market safe and to efficiently 
control the entrance and exit of people who use the Market. 



-31- 



COMPARISON SUMMARY: 



The following tabulation is a summary of the Farmers' Market Revenues, operating 
expenses, capital costs, and stall and tonnage fees from 1946 through June 30? 
1969: 



Fiscal 
Year 



■ 



Operating 
Expenses 



Excess of 
Revenue 



Stalls 

Rented 



Tonnage 



1946-47 
1947-48 
1948-49 
1949-50 
1950-51 
1951-52 
1952-53 
1953-54 
1954-55 
1955-56 
1956-57 
1957-58 
1958-59 
1959-60 
1960-61 
1961-62 
1962-63 
1963-64 
1964-65 
1965-66 
1966-67 
1967-68 
1968-69 



$ 16,006.50 
19,748.00 
26,287.50 
32,190.50 
20,601.50 
29,363.50 
33,403.25 
37,423.50 
37,916.25 
35,142.00 
34,812.06 
34,844.00 
40,93^.00 
46,850.75 
47,159.50 
41,769.75 
38,763.75 
37,541.00 
36,058.00 
35,892.00 
34,714.00 
32,008.50 
33,839.00 



I 4 
14 
15 
12 
21 
21 
18 
18 
18 
17 
18 
19 
22 
19 
20 

25 
20 
21 

23 
24 
24 
26 
28 



101.48 
747.31 
285.47 
458.77 
231.69 
651.73 
374.48 

670.37 
661.35 
675.67 
454.77 
148.69 
475.18 
583.62 
708.90 
129.64 
232.25 
863.44 

156.33 

310.17 
767.28 
273.02 
475.61 



I 11,905.02 

5,020.19 

11,002.03 

19,731.73 

-(630.19) 

7,711.77 

15,028.77 

18,753.13 

19,254.90 

17,466.33 
16,357.29 
15,695.31 
18,458.82 

27,267.13 

26,450.60 

16,640.11 

18,531.50 

15,677.56 

12,901.67 

11,573.83 

9,946.72 

5,735.48 

5,413.39 



15,428 
17,267 
20,895 
13,556 
14,431 
18,726 
20,662 
21,495 
20,755 
20,534 
20,659 
22,712 
22,128 
22,461 
21,012 
18,683 
13,367 
17,893 
17,847 
17,288 
15,781 
16,733 



6,085 
10,668 
11,695 
7,337** 
8,156 
3,813 
9,^97 
9,481 
7,927 
3,019 
7,694 
6,385 
6,806 
6,651 
5,675 
5,244 

4,897 
4,396 
4,085 
3,668 
3,431 
3,53 



S733,3l3.8l 



^457,425.72 3 325,893.09 



415,368 150,675 



* Records are incomplete for fiscal year. 

'* Market was closed from February to July due to 
construction of new stalls. 



-32- 



REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 
1968 - 69 

The City and County Charter and the State Elections Code vest the control 
conduct end management of registration of electors, the holding of elections, 
and all matters pertaining to elections in the Registrar of Voters. 

The Registrar has a staff of 2k permanent employees which is augmented 
during periods "hich precede and folio" elections by temporary workers v/ho num- 
ber the equivalent of 55 full-time employees. Thus the Registrar's staff in 
actuality is 79 employees. 

Volunteer Deputies : 

An increased burden of work has f al] en upon the permanent staff due to the 
increasing number of "volunteer deputies" v/ho apply for and receive affidavit 
books which they take out to register electors. The work turned in by such "vol- 
unteer deputies" must be examined for accuracy and corrections are frequently 
necessary. Additionally, such "volunteer deputies", often fail to return books of 
affidavits of registration and such failures to deliver cause the Registrar of 
Voters to expend many man hours of regular employee time in attempting to retrieve 
the missing books. 

In connection with such "volunteer deputies" it must be noted that the 
law makes it almost mandatory for the Registrar of Voters to give these persons 
books of affidavits upon their demand. 

Elections in 1968-^9 : 

Only one general election was held in fiscal 1968-69. This was the pres- 
idential election held in November 5» Vote counting by use of optical scanning 
sheets prepared by precinct workers for the scanning machine proved to be unsucc- 
essful and their use has been abandoned. The forthcoming election of November, 
1969 will employ punch cards on our electronic data system for the purpose of vote 
counting on election night. Precinct workers will not be involved with the punch 
cards. The abandoning of optical scanning is expected to assist in recruitment of 
precinct workers. 

Two City and County employee elections were conducted. In the first 
Warren DeMerritt was elected to the Retirement System Bo"rd in a spirited contest 
in which five candidates received 14,924 votes. In the other, Patrick M. Breen was 
returned to the Health Service System Board without opposition. A legal tech- 
nicality required going through the balloting, and the h~nd counting of 6,602 votes, 
even though there v/as but one candidate, and no write-in votes could be counted. 
The Registrar has initiated action to correct this situation. 

Personnel Reorganization : 

The personnel structure of the Office of the Registrar of Voters has long 
been a problem besetting successive Registrars, In the year 1968-69 this problem, 
together with other elective problems, was the subject of an investigation by a 
committee of the Board of Supervisors. After studying the vexatious situation of 
rapid turnover of key personnel, the committee came to the conclusion that these 
positions had been established at levels too low to retain competent and ambitious 
workers. 

-33- 



Following the announcement of the conclusions reached by the committee of 
the Board of Supervisors the Civil Service Commission also investigated the key 
personnel situation and, as a result of such investigation, upgraded the positions 
to levels commensurate with responsibilities. 

5^ZS£S Workload Comparison: 

1964-65 1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 

Regular elections (number) 12 1 4 1 

Registration affidavits 

processed 64,638 54,333 73,192 102,667 69,102 

Registration affidavits 

cancelled 82,908 38,390 74,109 40,219 35,617 

Sample ballots mailed 389,900 701,497 372,123 1,263,56*+ 374,335 

Absentee ballots requested 
(paper) 

Absentee vote (paper) 

Absentee vote (machine) 

Precincts used 

Voting Machines used 

Voting Machines loaned/leased 

Precinct vote (machines) 

Total votes cast 

Employee group elections 

(ballots) 12,629 26,157 13,725 29,187 21,526 



14,198 


7,615 


12,370 


24,602 


13,800 


12,602 


6,794 


10,613 


21,779 


13,231 


5,287 


5,780 


5,793 


19,059 


5,425 


1,3^1 


2,686 


1,340 


1,349 


1,349 


1,670 


3,275 


1,670 


5,897 


1,597 


274 


313 


260 


270 


312 


313,723 


425,249 


328,591 


877,928 


288,356 


331,612 


438,656 


372,188 


919,546 


307,012 



-34- 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATCP - PUBLIC GUARDIAN (196 8-69) 

Public Administrator 

The Public Adrinistrator is an officer of the County 
Government as described in Section 24000 of the Government Code 
and is provided for in the Charter of tha City and County of 
San Francisco. The purpose of the office is to nrovide for the 
protection of the property o^ deceased persons and for the :.ro- 
tection of the interests of heirs and creditors in such propertv. 

The duties of the Public Administrator as both a conservator 
and an administrator of the estates of deceased persons is set 
forth in Section 1140 of the Probate Code, as follows: "The Public 
Administrator of each county must take immediate charpe of the prop- 
erty within his county of persons who have died when no executor 
or administrator has been anpointed and in consequence thereof the 
property, or any part thereof, is bein" wasted, uncared for or lost; 
and of all estates ordered into his hands bv the Court. He shall 
apply for letters of administration upon estates o^ decedents who 
have no known heirs when the Superior Court of his county has juris- 
diction thereof, and may apply for such letters upon any other 
estate upon which he is entitled to administer." 

All functions pertaining to each estate are handled by the 
office staff. These functions include - the investigation, making 
funeral arrangements, applications for letters, collection of all 
assets, payment of all le^al debts, sales of real and personal 
property, filing and defending suits, obtaining all county, state, 
and Federal tax clearances, and distribution to heirs and the State 
of California. A complete and thorough investigation must be made 
of each estate reported - without a proper investigation there 
could be a loss of revenue to the county as well as a loss to the 
creditors and heirs. 

Investigation of Cases 

Approximately 40 per cent of the cases investigated are 
administered by the Public Administrator's Office. The remaining 
60 per cent either have no assets or are turned over to the named 
executor or administrator who may have a priority to serve. The 
above is one of the service functions of this office. 

5 Year Workload Comparison 



1965-66 


1965-67 


1967-68 


1968-69 


1969-70 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Estimated 


1,362 


1,376 


1,358 


1,402 


1,400 


609 


560 


510 


520 


500 


190 


289 


311 


370 


350 


309 


487 


373 


339 


350 



Estates Investigated 
New Estates Opened 
Final Accounts Filed 
Discharges Filed 
Open Estates 

(End of Year) 1,599 1,772 1,909 2,090 2,250 



-35- 



1965-66 1966-57 1967-58 1969-69 1969-70 
Actual A ctual Actual Actual Esiimated 

Revenue from Fees $193,000 $258,000 $309,000 $265,1+00 $200,000 
Operating Expenses $166,000 $162,000 $166,000 $137,100 $205,000 
Net Revenue $ 27,000 $ 96,000 $143,000 $ 78,300 $ -5,000 

The Public Administrator's Office is entirely self-supporting 
and as a matter of fact produces a profit for the City and County of 
San Francisco out of the revenues received from the estates of dece- 
dents. These revenues pay not only for the services in the general 
estates, but also for the free services provided in investipatinr 
decedents' deaths where no estates are ever opened by the Public 
Administrator. 

Efficiency of Administration 

The fact that the Public Administrator does receive statutory- 
fees in the reneral probates also imposes some obligation on him to 
the heirs and creditors to at least f?ive them the same attention as 
would private administrators. Heirs are frequently prepared to be 
critical of the Fublic Administrator's Office, especially in these 
cases in which they have been denied the richt to probate the estate 
because of their non-residence. They feel that, if they had been 
allowed to administer the estate, they could do a much more effi- 
cient job and a much speedier job than the Public Administrator. 
As a matter of fact, the Public Administrator's Office would not 
bow to any other administrator whether a corporate institution, 
such as a bank, or a private individual, as to the efficiency and 
speed with which nrobate matters are administered. 

The public, of course, is not aware of this and the constant 
problem of attempting to please the unreasonable as well as the 
reasonable segments of the nublic means that every step must be 
taken that will insure a mere efficient use of the staff. Actually, 
most expenditures which could be made to increase efficiency would, 
in fact, not be additional exnense, but rather an investment to 
return more income to the City. There is every indication that the 
number of cases and the amount of money to be returned in estates 
will, durinr the years, continue to increase. The sooner these 
cases can be processed to completion, the sooner the fees are 
returned to the City treasury. 

10 Year Comparison - Expenditures and Revenues 

Budgeted Actual 
Fiscal Expendi- Expendi- Differ- Estimated Actual Differ- 
Year tures tures ence Revenue Revenue ence 

1958-59 $115,454 $114,215 $-1,239 $180,000 $176,539 $- 3,462 

1959-60 118,185 115,716 -2,469 185,000 205,249 20,249 

1960-61 134,654 129,742 -4,912 200,000 203,570 3,570 

1961-62 147,520 138,761 -8,759 210,000 181,652 -28,348 

1962-63 150,721 147,190 -3,531 200,000 230,508 30,508 

-36- 



Budgeted Actual 
Fiscal Expendi- Expendi- Differ- Estimated Actual Differ- 
Year tures tures ence Revenue Revenue ence 

1963-64 $155,791 $149,169 $-5,631 $207,099 $215,610 $ 9,610 

1964-65 162,441 154,996 -7,850 200,000 193,442 - 6,558 

1965-56 171,478 166,276 -5,202 200,900 122,645 - 7,355 

1966-67 158,425 162,033 3,608 200,000 257,500 57,500 

1967-68 170,000 166,537 -3,463 200,000 309,000 109,000 

1968-69 181,299 187,144 5,845 200,000 265,400 65,400 

1969-70 205,642 200,000 

Public Guar d ian 

The office of p ublic Guardian was created in San Francisco 
County on July 1, 1960, under authority of Section 517 5 of the Wel- 
fare and Institutions Code of the State of California. On July 1, 
1960, the Public Administrator became ex officio Public Guardian, 
The purpose of the office is to provide a public officer to serve, 
when needed, as guardian of the person and/or estate. 

The Public Guardian, like any other ruardian appointed by the 
Court, has the care and custody of the person of his ward and the 
management of his estate until legally discharged, or in the case of 
the euardianship of a minor, until the minor reaches the a^e of 
majority, or the ward marries at 18 or over. The o-uardian must pay 
the ward's just debts as far as the estate is able, if necessary 
selling the ward's real property or borrowing on it. He must demand, 
sue for and collect all debts due the ward. He must appear for and 
represent the ward in all actions or proceedings. He must manage 
the ward's estate frugally and without waste and apply the income as 
far as necessary to the convenience, suitable support, maintenance, 
and age of the ward. 

He must file an inventory of all the estate's assets, together 
with an appraisal of the assets, unless the estate consists of money 
only, or money and other personal property of a market value of less 
than $50.00. He must file periodic accounts for approval by the Court 
Upon the death of the ward, if no probate of the estate is necessary, 
the funeral and last illness expenses may be paid, and, after such 
payment of these expenses and of the fees of the Public Guardian, a 
balance of cash remains in the estate, this may be delivered to the 
heirs at law under Section 6 30 of the Probate Code or delivered to 
the Public Administrator for administration. 

The Public Guardian procrara has been in operation for nine 
years. The propram is beneficial both to the ward and to the county. 
The ward is benefited by the personal attention of this office. The 
county is benefited by the payments for hospitalization and for back 
obligations of the ward. Without the Public Guardian -oropram these 
incompetent Deople would be unable to collect welfare assistance, 
Social Security, and other pensions or benefits to which they are 
entitled. 



-37- 



Eases Crowded Hospital Condition 

Where possible and when it appears to be in the best interest 
of the wards, they are moved from the county facilities to private 
rest homes. This provides additional beds at the San Francisco Gen- 
eral Hospital for patients who are more in n^ed of medical assistance 

Workload Comparison 





1965-66 


1966-67 


196' 


'-68 


1968-69 


1969-70 




Actual 


Acti 


jal 


Actual 


Actual 


Estimated 


Applications 






















Investigated 


1. 


,163 


2 


,141 


lj 


,696 


1. 


,792 


1, 


,700 


Total Wards as 






















of June 3 




398 




446 




498 




531 




550 


New Wards durin 


0" 




















Year 




247 




152 




124 




130 




150 


Guardianships 






















Terminated 




61 




102 




74 




97 




131 



Expenditures $ 91,000 $ 116,000 $ 131,000 $ 139,200 $ 156,700 
Benefits to 

County $761,000 $1,762,000 $1,800,000 $1,800,000 $2,000,000 
Revenues from 

Fees $ 9,100 $ 18,500 $ 19, GOO $ 52,580 $ 60,000 

Fees 

The Welfare and Institutions Code provides that the Public 
Guardian may be awarded fees by the judce of the Superior Court on 
the filinp of his accounts. The fees for the last fiscal year 
amounted to $52,580.00. These fees are in addition to other benefits, 
both direct and indirect, received through this program. 

Present and Anticipated Future Requirements 

As noted, even though the workload has increased, the present 
staff is able to handle the current workload. Due to the physical 
consolidation of the Public Administrator - Public Guardian office, 
the loss of four reouested positions did not handicap the operation 
of the office as much as was expected. The utilization of personnel 
formerly assigned only to the respective offices in either propram 
has afforded more flexibility to meet fluctuation in the workload of 
each office. 

As reported last year, two situations have increased the work- 
load; namely, (1) the burial of the indigent dead; and (2) the 
investigation and burial arrangements of competent persons who die 
outside of the county and who are recipients of welfare benefits. 

At present the San Francisco Collep-e of Mortuary Science has a 
contract with the City and County of San Francisco for the removal and 
burial of the indigent dead. Due to the increased number of welfare 
recipients dyinp outside the county, the determination of indigency, 



-38- 



especially at nights and on weekends, has become a serious problem. 
The jurisdiction of various County Departments (such as the Depart- 
ment of Public Health, the Coroner, and the Public Administrator 1 ) 
in determininr the indigency o^ these decedents is in doubt. At 
jcint meetings of representatives of these departments, it was con- 
cluded on a purely practical basis that the Public Administrator was 
in the best position to determine indigency and to complete the 
necessary arrangements when the death occurs during the nirht cr 
weekend hours. At this time there is no way to make any reasonable 
calculation as to the effect on the Public Administrator workload 
in the near future. 

The other situation which affects the workload is the increasing 
practice by the Department of Social Welfare and the County Hospitals 
of niacin? competent patients in nursinr and convalescent homes in 
other counties (Alameda, Contra Costa, Napa, Solano, San Mateo, Marin, 
Sonoma). Since these persons are involuntarily removed, they are 
residents of San Francisco and the other counties will not assume 
liability for their burial. 

At the joint meetings referred to above, a practical working 
arrangement has been initiated whereby the other affected deparcments 
are supposed to supply the p ublic Administrator's office with detaile' 
information as to these placements and the history and assets of the 
patients . 

Presently we are changing our accounting system from a manual 
to an electronic accounting machine operation. This change should 
speed up the processing of estates and also facilitate handling the 
inevitable increase in our caseload. 

We do not know what effect the enactment of the Lanterman- 
Petris-Short Act (effective July 1, 1969) will have on the Public 
Guardian prop-ram. If the number of referrals exceeds our normal 
intake, additional positions will have to be allocated. 



-39- 



TAX COLLECTOR 



1968-69 



The Tax Collector operates under several sets of laws, either 
State or Local, as the basic nature of the task to be done dictates. 
As a County Officer he must observe the directives of the State Revenue 
and Taxation Code in: (a) collecting current and delinquent real and 
personal property taxes, (b) preparing and publishing by Sept. fa of each 
year a list of delinquent real estate tax payers, (c) making required 
periodic reports to the State Controller and to the local auditor, 
(d) executing deeds to the State of California on properties delinquent 
for five or more years, (e) making provisions to hold public auctions of 
tax-deeded properties and the actual auctions themselves, and (f ) making 
refunds on duplicate or erroneous payments. 

As a City Officer he proceeds under the Charter and Ordinances of 
the City and County in: (a) collecting licenses, (b) operating the 
Bureau of Delinquent Revenue, (c) collecting Parking Meter receipts, 
(d) collecting the Hotel Room Tax, and (e) collecting Business Tax, and 
(f ) making the reports and settlements required of a local official who 
collects monies. 

During the 1968-69 fiscal year, the Tax Collector's Office 
assumed the collection of the Business Tax which became effective 
October 1, 196b. This added function caused an increase, in activities 
in most of the other bureaus such as: increased payroll, increased 
materials, supplies, equipment, and etc. To administer the taxes, 
the personnel of the Tax Collector's Office increased by L2 employees. 

Cashier's Divisior 

During 196fa-69, the Cashier's Division of the Tax Collector's 
Office collected $250,596,062.55, an all-time high for the fifteenth 
consecutive year. 

Peak periods for tax collection were from July 15 to September 
15 for unsecured personal property taxes, and from November 1 to Decem- 
ber 15 and March 1 to April 15 for real property taxes. Peak periods 
for license collections were in January, July and October. 



-ko- 



A comparison of yearly parking met^r revenue follows j 

1961-62 $1,U59,558 1965-66 $1,569, 20U 

1962-63 1,191,368 1966-67 l,U96,36l 

1963-61 1,U67,727 1967-68 1,395,855 

196U-65 1,550,903 1968-69 1,230,323 

Eurcau of Delinquent Revenue 

A total of 7,535 accounts, other than personal property billings, 
was transferred to the Bureau of Delinquent Revenue by various City and 
County departments during 1966-69. 

Thu. number of accounts handled represents a continous increase 
over those of previous fiscal years. This was accomplished with no 
increase in th<- number of personnel and without a full crew of 
investigators in the field for the entire year. 

As part of the reform program many more personal property bills 
have been placed on the secured roll resulting in a slight drop of the 
unsecured bills transferred to the Tax Collector. 

Cost to the City and County for monies collected by the Bureau 
of Delinquent Revenue was approximately S'i during the same fiscal year. 

Following is a summary of activities of the Bureau for 1966-69 
showing a comparison with 1967-68. 

1967-68 1966-69 

Nc. Unsec. Prop. Tax Bills 
Collections, Unscc.Del. Prop. Taxes 

No. Pub .Health Dept.Del.Accts. 
Collections, Pub. Health Dept. 

No. Pub. Library Del. Accts. 
Collections, Public Library 

New Sonoma Home Accts. 
Collections, Sonoma ^ome 

No. Other City & Co. Dept.Del.Accts 
Collections, Other Depts . 

Nclnterest, Fees, Court Costs Accts. 
Collections, Interest, Fees, Court Costs 

Total No. Accounts Received 

Total Collections, Delinquent Accounts $U,213,OU6.07 

As part of collection enforcement procedures, 235 court actions 
were instituted in 1968-69 . Of this total, 160 were filed in Small 
Claims Court, 67 in the Municipal Court and 6 in the Superior Court. 



-kl- 



93,015 
$3,692,310.21 


78,292 
$1,295,951.93 


1,670 

366,U56.8h 


1,910. 

353, 533. 2U 


2,080 
6,2U3.66 


2,972 
12,612.11 


8 
85,226.11 


11 
83,987.00 


725 

61,612.71 


2,U66 
63,60O.6U 


129 
852. 6U 


1U5 
2,259.61 


97,627 
$U, 213, 018.07 


85,827 

$1,816,9U7.56 



Following is a table of collections for the various divisions 
for 1968-69, as compared with 1967-68. 

1967-68 1968-69 

Real Property Taxes and Secured 

Personal Property Taxes $170,63U, 261.31 $200,529,267.98 

Unsecured Personal Property Taxes 19,U28,682.21 17,003,928.15 

Uniform Sales and Purchase Tax 22,86l4,665„8U 22,882,161.29 

Parking Meters 1,395, 855. U9 1,280,323.73 

Delinquent Revenue ...... 3,553,U29.U5 1,92^,866.57 

Licenses . . * 3,526,5ii7.56 a,807,267.30 

Miscellaneous 76,60U.71 199,296.12 



TOTAL . . . $221,500,266.57 $2U8,627,136.7U 
Gross Receipts Tax I,96tl,9li5c8l 



GRAND TOTAL $250,596,082.55 
Real Estate Division 

Further adaptation of property tax collections and accounting 
to E.D.P. was planned in 1968-69. Programming by the E.D.P. staff is 
proceding with the ultimate objective of having all tax collection 
procedures and accounts done electronically. The July real estate 
rolls, the mailing list and the November bills are all being elec- 
tronically produced. Rapidity of achievement is, of course, con- 
tingent upon the amount of time and attention that can be given by 
the E.D.P. staff to Tax Office matters. 

Due to our implied legal obligation to mail tax bills to an 
address that has been given to the County Recorder, it is imperative 
that E.D.P. help us keep current on new deed recordings. 

Real estate tax delinquencies in San Francisco are still the 
lowest among all major counties in the state. 

The following table shows delinquencies for 1968-1969 compared 
with 1967-1968. 

Real Property Unsecured Property 
Taxes Taxes 

Amount Delinquent d une 30, 1969 $2,279,168.50 552,295-Oh 

Amount Delinquent June 30, 1968 2,351,698.99 h9h, 516.19 

Per Cent Delinquent June 30, 1969 1.12 2.96 

Per Cent Delinquent °une 30, 1968 1.37 2.37 



-42- 



There were 2,U8l parcels sold to the State and 16 deeded to 
the State in 1968-69, compared to 3h00 parcels sold to the State and 
the same number deeded to the State in the prior fiscal year. 

The outstanding decrease in the number of parcels sold to the 
State June 30, 1969 was due, in part, to the first installment delinquent 
notice sent out by this office for the first time. This notice was so 
successful that it will be followed as standard procedure in the future. 

Uniform Sales and Purchase Tax 

San Francisco's Uniform Sales and Purchase Tax has been collected 
since July 1, 1958, by the State of California as agent for the City 
and County, and the revenues minus collection costs are returned to the 
City and County. 

The figures for this, and last year, are shown previously in 
this report. 

Business Tax Division 

The Business Tax Ordinance went into effect on October 1, 1968, 
Originally, the measure of the tax period was on a quarterly basis and 
the first collection was payable in January, 1969. In March, 1969, 
the measure of the tax period was amended to a semi-annual basis with 
the first semi-annual period ending June 30, 1969, and payment due 
during the month of July, 1969. Collections on a cash basis totalled 
$1,968,916.31 for the fiscal year 1963-69. A s of now, it is estimated 
that $8,000,000.00 will be collected annually. 

Parking Meter Division 

The Parking Meter Division collects, sorts, counts, and prepares 
for deposit all coins deposited in approximately 13,15>0 parking meters 
in San Francisco. Thirteen collectors are used in the operation, eight 
men in three panel trucks collecting the money and winding the springs 
of about h, 0^0 meters daily, while five men in the office process the 
coins. Of the U3,k77,329 coins handled during the fiscal year 1968-69, 
29.163,667 were pennies or 67%; 8,861,311 were nickels or 20.1$j and 
!p,U£2,3!?1 were dimes or 12.6$. The total weight of the coins processed 
during the year was 322,821 pounds. 

During the year liOO lbs. of mutilated coins, plugs, can rings 
and foreign coins were processed. Canadian and other foreign coins 
were redeemed for $li5>0.00. 

The decrease in weight and revenue is attributed in part to the 
removal of many meters during construction work. 



-<*> 



Bureau of Licenses 

For the fiscal year 1968-69, the Bureau of Licenses showed an 
increase in gross receipts. As an efficacy move, we have endeavored 
to plac<- licenses on an annual , rather than a quarterly basis, where- 
ever possible. Following is a breakdown of licenses by type, number 
and amount for 1968-69 compared to 1967-68* 

1967 - 1968 1968 - 1969 





Number 


Amount 


IHimber 


Amount 


General Business 


26,6U9 


$ 702,323.32 


30,657 


$ 830,665.59 


Vehicles 


379 


bO,$77.00 


318 


39,90lwlO 


Bicycles 


2,°U9 


1,500.50 


3,227 


1,613.50 


Inspection F^s 


2,U66 


90,321.25 


2,327 


90,72U.99 


Contractors 


2,069 


20,882.00 


1,979 


19,973.00 


Miscellaneous 


U,076 


7,505.55 


3,71ii 


8,683.55 


Dog 


31,00k 


12ii,012.00 


30,368 


121,572.00 


Duplicate Dog Tags 


398 


200.50 


U50 


222.00 


Curb Painting 


8 


1,972.1*9 


13 


2,012.50 


Pub. Eat. Place 






796 


16,966.00 


Total (Excluding 










Hotel Room Tax) 


72,1*78 


$1,005,692.36 


73,879 


$1,161,337.53 


Hotel Room Tax 


1,U31 


2,520,873.25 


i,lao 


3,117,525.01 


GRAND TOTAL 










License Bureau 


73,909 


$3,526,565.61 


75,289 


$1,581,662. 5U 


Hotel Room Tax Sub 


-Bureau 









Although a separate Budget item, the Hotel Room Tax as shown 
above is collected by the Bureau of Licenses. 

Each quarterly amount represents the tax collected by the 
hotels between the dates specified, 

A comparison of collections by quarters follows: 

1967 - 1968 1968 - 1969 

July 1 - September 30 $ 172,091.39 $ 901,910. 0U 

October 1 - December 31 587,052.27 872,316.28 

January 1 - March 31 725,782.69 808,1*88.65 

April 1 - June 30 735,91+6,90 83l*,8lO.Ol* 



TOTAL $2,520,873.25 $ 3, U17, 525.01 



-kk- 



DOCUMENTS 

SEP 3 1970 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



1969-70 



Annual Report 



DIRECTOR OF 



FINANCE AND RECORDS 




INCLUDING 



County Clerk Recorder Records Center 

Registrar of Voters Tax Collector 

Records Preservation Officer 



Public Guardian 



Public Administrator 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Agricultural Commissioner Farmers' Market 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Director 

of 

Finance and Records 



September 1, 1970 



Subject: 1969-70 Annual 
Report 
Honorable Thomas J. Mellon 
Chief Administrative Officer 
City and County of San Francisco 

Dear Mr. Mellon: 

Herewith is submitted our annual report for the fiscal 

year ended June 30, 1970, covering the City and County departments 

and offices under the jurisdiction of the Director of Finance and 
Records. 

Subject to the approval of the Chief Administrative Officer, 
the Director of Finance and Records administers the services and 
activities of the Departments of Finance and Records, Weights and 
Measures, and Agriculture, which include the offices of County Clerk, 
Recorder, Registrar of Voters, Public Administrator, Public Guardian, 
Tax Collector, Records Center, Records Preservation Officer, Sealer 
of Weights and Measures, Farmers' Market and Agricultural Commissioner. 

Separate reports for each of these offices are included 
herein, together with the statistical data requested by the Mayor. 
Each separate report was prepared by the office head concerned. 

Offices which support or approximately support themselves 
through fees collected for services provided are the Recorder, Public 
Administrator, and Farmers' Market. The Public Guardian likewise more 
than pays its own way, the benefits realized largely through hospital 
benefits paid in behalf of the wards. 

Very truly yours, 
P, 



V*#L£WM£ 



VIRGIL L. ELLIOTT 
Director 



INDEX 



Letter of Transmittal 1 

Index 2 

Organizati on Chart 3 

Records Center h 

Records Preservation Officer 7 

Recorder . . 11 

Sealer of Weights and Measures Ik 

Agricultural Commissioner 16 

Farmers' Market „ 21 

Registrar of Voters 25 

Public Administrator-Public Guardian 27 

Tax Collector 33 

County Clerk , *+0 



-2- 



ORGANIZATION CHaRT — DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND RECORDS 
City and County of San Francisco, California 
j MAYOR AND BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 



LEGAL 



FISCAL 



PERSONNEL 



City & Dist Attys | j Controller, Tres. 



Civil Service 



I EMPLOYEE WELFARE 



j Ret. Sys,, H.S.sT 



PROPERTY 



Real Estate Dept. 



)IRECTOR ; S OFFICE 
2 employees 



CHIEF 
ADMINISTRATOR OFFICER 



Thomas J. Mellon 



DIRECTOR 

of 

FINANCE AND RECORDS 



Virgil L. Elliott 



b 



SUPPLY 



P urchasing; Dept. 



._ MAIM . , REPAIR | 
i Pub. Works Dept. 



DATA PROCESSING 



Conwoller 



REGISTRAR 
OF VOTERS 



Emmery Mihaly 



Register San 
Francisco Voters; 
conduct elections, 
including employee 
elections; main- 
tain voting 
machines. 



COUNTY CLEEK, 
RECORDER 



2k employees 



M artin Mongan 

Keep records of 
the Super?. -.-r Ct; 
issue marriage 
licenses ; pro- 
vide courtroom 
clerks; record 
and index 
documents. 



90 employees 



ry 


TAX 
ELECTOR j 


1 

j Ta 


i 

.d Broun 1 


Collect 


! 

ad ■ 


valorem 


and un- 


secured 

parking 
receipt 


taxes, 
meter 
5; issue 


1 busines 
j Receive 
1 arid use 
j ceipts. 

' hotel a; 


3 licenses 
purchase 
tax re- 
collect 

id busi- 


1 ness ta: 


z. 


1 

110 employees 



PUBLIC ADMIN. 
PUBLIC GUARDIAN 



Con S. Shea 



Administer 
estates; serves 
as Public 
Guardian. 



28 employees 



AGRICULTURAL 
COMMISSIONER 



R. L. Bozzini 



Inspects fruits, 
vegetables, nuts, 
poultry, eggs, honey 
nursery, pest con- 
trol & seed; inspect 
for plant quarantine 
and export certifi- 
cates. 

9 employees 



RECORDS 
CENTER 



Wm. Satterfielcl 
! 3 employees 



FARMERS' 
: MARKET 

! F.J.O'Connell 



3 employees 



SEALER OF 1 
WTS, & MEASURES 

Kenneth G. Royal 

JTest weighing and ; 
measuring devices,) 
inspect packaged | 
commodities. 



9 employees 



6-30-70 



RECORDS CENTER 
1969-7C 

Function of the Records Center, established by Ordinance No. 7070, is to 
provide for the orderly storage, care and management of City and County Depart- 
ment Records which must, by law or other requirement, be kept for varying 
periods of time and whose removal from the offices involved is necessary because 
of the absence of storage space. 

At the end of its seventeenth year of operation, fifty- three departments 
were storing a total of 39,287 cubic feet of records in the Center, the bulk 
being boxed paper records. 

During fiscal 1969-70, there were 3,139 cubic feet of records received 
from various departments. Authorization for the destruction of approximately 
5,000 cubic feet of boxed records has been received but due to the heavy 
increase in the number of references to stored records and the lack of addi- 
tional personnel, the preparation of these records for removal and destruction 
was deferred. 

Records Center service is provided without charge to the departments. 
Storage boxes and transportation of boxed records from office to storage is 
supplied. Reference service to stored records is a major function of the 
Center as well as the interfiling of documents sent by the department for 
records or files previously sent to storage. Records requested by departments 
are delivered twice daily by public transportation. 

The number of references to stored records during the past fiscal year 
was 2^,907. A reference (statistical count value: 2) is considered to be the 
complete cycle of the following: 

1) Request for record (more often than not by phone) 

2) Obtaining storage box location from Kardex 

3) Removal of record from storage box 

4) Typing and affixing copy of reference service request form to record 

5) Delivery of record to requesting office. Remove signed original of 
reference request form from Kardex 

6) Pick-up and return of record to Center when reference is complete 

7) Removal of reference service request form from record and original 
of same from Kardex 

8) Refiling returned record in storage box 

Interfilings (additions to records on hand) must be sorted by depart- 
mental designation and record title, their box locations entered from Kardex 
and then placed within the proper file in storage box. Since it is necessary 
to refer to each storage box only once for each interfiled document, a statis- 
tical count value of "1" is given for such activity. Our reference ratio for 
the past year was 1 to 1.57. This means that we serviced one (1) reference 
request for each 1.57 cubic feet of records in storage. By way of comparison 
the reference ratio for fiscal year 195^-55 was 1 to 4, a figure which indicated 
that on an overall basis we were holding records that were neither too active 
nor too inactive in terms of reference activity. 



-k- 



While the reference ratio for fiscal year 1969-70 reflects a marked 
increase in reference activity, it should be pointed out that this increase 
is concentrated within certain groupings of records, principally those of 
the County Clerk's Office. Records of many departments have little or no 
reference activity. 

The Records Center has custody of the microfilmed records stored in the 
Twin Peaks Tunnel Vault. Custody of these records was transferred from the 
Recorder to the Records Center by Ordinance No. 8689. An inventory taken at 
the time of transfer revealed that City departments had 930 rolls of microfilm 
in storage. Total rolls in storage for various City departments as of this 
date is: 6,^36. Number of references for fiscal year 1969-70: 2. 



-5- 



RECORDS IN STORAGE AS OF JUNE 30, 1970 



DEPARTMENT 



MICROFILM 


PAPER 


RECORDS 


1969-70 


(100« Reels) 


(Cubic Feet) 


References 






268 


20 






16 




38.5 




417 
58 


29 


70.0 




623 


110 


.3 












6 


2 






934 


25 


39.5 




123 


72 


7.8 




1,335 


268 


17.6 




5,747 


33 



Adult Probation 

Art 

Assessor 

Board of Permit Appeals 

Board of Supervisors 

Calif. Palace Legion of Honor . 
Chief Administrative Officer . . 

City Attorney 

City Planning 

Civil Service 

Controller 

De Young Museum .8 

District Attorney 26 

Electricity 3*3 

Fair Employment 4 

Finance and Records: 

County Clerk (Superior Court) ... 55«5 

Recorder 4,266.0 

Registrar of Voters 

Public Administrator 

Tax Collector 7.8 

Weights and Measures 

Law Library 6.0 

Mayor 

Municipal Court 55 • 

Public Defender 

Public Health: 

Child Psychiatric Clinic » 

Crippled Children's Services .... 

City Clinic 

Laguna Honda 

Other Health Services 15.0 

S.F. General Hospital 

Public Utilities: 

Airport 1.5 

Bur. of Light, Heat and Power .... 2.5 

General Office P.U.C 

Hetch Hetchy 15.0 

Municipal Railway 3«5 

Utilities Engineering Bureau .... 525.0 

Water 74.0 

Public Works: 

Army Street Office 

Engineering Office 

Main Office 55.8 

Sewer Repair Division 

Purchasing 

Real Estate 

Recreation and Park 6.5 

Retirement System 8.5 

Schools 1,064.5 

Sheriff 3.8 

Social Services 

Superior Court (Sec'y Records) ... 2.3 
Youth Guidance Center 

TOTALS 6,3^6.0 39,287 24,907 



14, 108 


18, 406 


583 


4 


49 


1 


422 


30 


343 


310 


4 




12 




3,413 


1,966 


67 


5 


219 


572 


176 


232 


340 


1,181 


328 


70 


271 


1 


3,118 


630 


107 


15 


116 




337 


8 



638 


15 


217 


96 


41 


13 


3 




1,325 


194 


105 


9 


1,283 


3 


1,681 


72 


29 




311 


493 



RECORDS PRESERVATION OFFICER 



1969-70 



Sections 8.9-8.11 pf the Administrative Code provide that the "public 
interest demands that various City and County records which would be essential 
to the continuity of government and the protection of rights and interest of 
individuals in event of a major disaster be preserved against possible destruc- 
tion by fire, earthquake, flood, enemy attack or other cause." 

This code provision names the Chief Administrative Officer, or the head 
of any department under his jurisdiction as designated by him, to serve as 
Records Preservation Officer. The Chief Administrative Officer delegated this 
duty to the Director of Finance and Records. 

The Records Preservation Officer is required to submit annually to the 
Mayor and the Board of Supervisors a report containing recommendations as to 
which City and County records should be designated as essential and preserved 
against a major disaster. In addition, he is required to report "on the status 
and progress of the records preservation program, together with recommendations 
for making such revisions as deemed necessary to keep the inventory cf essential 
records current, accurate and complete." 

Essential Records Safeguarded : 

The latest such report submitted December 1, 1969, classified 23,^+38,261 
pages of City and County records as essential within the meaning of Administra- 
tive Code Sections 8.9-8.11. Of this total, 11,931,861 pages had been safeguarded 
by a preservation copy, either on microfilm, paper, by dispersal, or in a fire- 
proof office vault. 

San Francisco, in the 1906 earthquake and fire, lost most of its vital 
records. It took many years and innumerable court actions to reconstruct 
important lost documents. Today, many important records have been safeguarded 
through preservation copies. Included are birth, marriage and death records; 
property documents; Superior Court judgments, decrees, wills and jury verdicts; 
Board of Supervisors' ordinances, resolutions and journals; Board of Education 
records; City Planning minutes and maps; Fire Department minutes and maps; 
Public Works engineering records; Utilities Engineering Bureau engineering 
records, and Water Department customer records. 

Microfilming enables keeping in the department official copies of old 
records, rather than having them stored at the Records Center or some other 
remote location. In addition to convenience, there is a tremendous saving in 
space, the ratio being 60 to 1. The original expense is a major item of con- 
sideration, and must be borne by the department having custody of the record. 

The cost to produce a 16 mm microfilm image is approximately 1.7% for 
letter size paper records and about 2# for legal size documents. The cost 
varies somewhat depending on whether the work is done by city personnel or by 
an outside contractor. 



-7- 



Records that must be kept indefinitely should be microfilmed. The break- 
even point is approximately kO years. Any paper record that must be kept for 
kO years or more can be kept more economically (not to mention more conveniently^ 
in microfilm form. And duplicate preservation copies should be made of all 
essential records. Duplicate 16 mm microfilm copies can be made for about 1/2 <t 
per image. 

The three recommended methods for preserving essential records are: 

MICROFILM — The original document is microfilmed. A 
microfilm copy replaces the department's original copy 
for daily office reference; a second microfilm copy is 
stored in the Records Center's Underground Vault as a 
security copy. Under these conditions, the original 
paper copy usually can be destroyed, when certain 
approvals have been obtained. (An alternative microfilming 
method : The paper original remains in the department for 
office reference; the microfilm copy is stored in the 
Records Center's Underground Vault. This method is less 
costly, but it deprives the department of space that could 
be saved with having a microfilm copy for office reference, 
if space is a factor for consideration.) 

DISPERSAL — A duplicate copy (carbon, mimeograph, photo-copy, 
microfilm, etc.) is stored at a remote location. The duplicate 
copy then could be returned to the department in event the 
original is lost. 

OFFICE VAULT ~ If a fireproof office vault is available, 
this should provide reasonable security for essential records. 
Usually this method is used only where the volume of essential 
records is relatively small. 



As 
microfilm 
microfilm 
microfilm 
There are 
advisable 
project. 



a general rule, any City and County record may be microfilmed and the 
copy substituted for the original paper copy, providing that one 
copy is made conveniently accessible to the public and a duplicate 
copy is stored in a safe and separate place for security purposes, 
numerous exceptions and variations to this rule, however. It is 
to consult the City Attorney before initiating any record microfilming 



The Records Preservation Officer will assist in every way possible in 
the developing of records preservation program. Funds required for such 
activities must be requested by the department, office, board or commission 
through the usual budgetary channels. Our "Inventory of Records Designated as 
Essential" follows on the next two pages. 



Department 

ADULT PROB. 

AIRPORT 

ART COMM. 

ASSESSOR 

BD. OF EDUCATION 

BD, OF SUPS. 

C.A.0 o 

CITY ATTORNEY 

CITY PLANNING 

CIVIL SERVICE 

CONTROLLER 

COUNTY CLERK 

deYOUNG MUSEUM 
ELECTRICITY 
FIRE DEPT. 
HEALTH SER. SYS. 
HOUSING APPEALS 
HOUSING AUTHORITY 
JUV. PROBATION 
LEGION OF HONOR 
MUNICIPAL COURT 



INVENTORY OF RECORDS DESIGNATED AS ESSENTIAL 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

(as *f December 1, 1969) 

Essential 

Records 

(Type) 

Minutes 

Leases 

Minutes 

Assessment Files 

Minutes, etc. 

Ords. & Resolutions 
Journals 

P. & A. Contracts 

Rulings 

Minutes, Maps 

Minutes, Personnel 

Fiscal, Payroll 

Judgments 

Indexes 

Registers 

Minutes, Inventory 

Cable Maps 

Minutes, Maps 

Membership Records 

Minutes 

Minutes, Leases 

Minutes 

Minutes, Inventory 

Registers 

Indexes, Min. Books 





Safeguarded 


Preservation 


Essential 


by 


Method in 


Records 


Preservation 


Use or 


(Pages) 


Copies (Pages) 


Recommended 


5,600 


2,200 


Office Vault 


4.300 


1,000 


Office Vault 


6,4ro 


1,500 


Office Vault 


900,00^ 


20,000 


Office Vault 


575,000 


540,000 


Microfilm 


145,00^ 


135,000 


Microfilm 


215,000 


210,000 


Office Vault 


1,000 





Office Vault 


36,500 


p 


Dispersal 


3l,coo 


25,000 


Office Vault 


205,500 


10,000 


Office Vault 


600,000 


100,000 


Microfilm 


3,6V\GOO 


300,0. r o 


Microfilm 


96,000 


p 


Micrcfilm 


559,00^ 





Microfilm 


80, 400 


3,000 


Office Vault 


1,000 


1,000 


Microfilm 


15 , 8co 


15,8co 


Office Vault 


62,00*, 


10,000 


Office Vault 


3,000 


1,000 


Office Vault 


80, 400 


5,oco 


Office Vault 


4,400 


1,000 


Office Vault 


45,400 


5,000 


Office Vault 


930,000 


n 


Microfilm 


895,000 





Microfilm 



Department 
MUNI. RAILWAY 
PARKING AUTH. 
POLICE DEPT. 
PUBLIC ADMIN. 
PUBLIC HEALTH 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 
PUBLIC WORKS 

P.U.C. 
PURCHASER 

REAL ESTATE 
RECORDER 

REC.-PARK 
REDEVELOPMENT 
RETIREM'T SYS. 
SHERIFF 
U.E.B. (PUC) 
WAR MEMORIAL 
WATER DEPT. 
WELFARE 



Essential 

Records 

(Type) 

Misc. Records 

Auth. Minutes 

Commission Minutes 

Active Case Records 

Birth Records 
Death Records 
Other 
Disinterments 

Commission Minutes 

DPW Minutes 
Engineering Records 
Sewer Main Maps 
Other Maps 
Minutes 

Contracts 
Equipment Inventory 

Property Records 



Essential 

Records 

(Pages) 




1,910,000 
1,650,000 

100,000 

60,000 

3,400 

280, 0C0 

75,000 

1,000 

1,000 

50,000 

3,000 

18,700 
60,000 



Safeguarded 

by 

Preservation 
Copi es (Page s) 

3,500 

5,000 

10,000 

8,000 

1,910,000 

1,650,000 
15,000 
60,000 




40,000 

500 

500 






5,000 



Misc. Documents 


7,625,000 


5,600,000 


Marriage Licenses 


621,861 


621,861 


Commission Minutes 


5,800 


3,000 


Minutes, Contracts 


10,800 


1,000 


Membership Records 


964,000 





Inmate Records 


9,000 


4,0C0 


Engineering Records 


560,000 


525, OCC 


Minutes 


21,900 


2,000 


Customer Records 


108,000 


75,000 


Minutes 


19,200 


6,000 



Preservation 
Method in 
Use or 
Rec omme nded 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Dispersal 
Dispersal 
Microfilm 
Microfilm 

Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Microfilm 
Microfilm 
Microfilm 
Office Vault 

Office Vault 
Office Vault 

Office Vault 

Microfilm 

Dispersal 

Office Vault 
Office Vault 
Microfilm 
Office Vault 
Microfilm 
Office Vault 
Office Vault 
Office Vault 



TOTALS 



23,438,261 11,931,861 



RECORDER 
1969-70 Annual Report 



The Recorder's Office, as required by law, receives for recording 
all papers or notices that may legally be recorded, makes and keeps a 
true copy of the original, indexes the same, and arranges the books of 
record and indices in suitable places to facilitate their inspection. 

In the Recorder's budget for 1969-70, $1700 was appropriated for 
the purchase of a microfilm reader-printer. It was planned to remove 
one of the large Photostat machines and substitute this much smaller 
machine, which will make copies from roll film or acetate jackets, either 
positive or negative. In June of 1969, it was discovered that by 
transferring some unused funds a reader-printer could be purchased from 
1968-69 funds, opening the way for disposal of both Photostat machines, 
making available for use a considerable amount of floor space. In order 
to accomplish this, we rented a Xerox copier to make copies of marriage 
records which are negative originals and are not on microfilm. By 
transferring the unused ^1700 in the 1969-70 budget, we were able to 
install a separate electrical circuit, required by this Xerox machine, 
and pay the rental fees for the copier for the ensuing year, resulting 
in more rapid and efficient service during 1969-70. The Photostat 
machines are no longer being used and the Purchasing Department was 
requested prior to June 30 to remove them from the office. 



Receipts 



1967-68 



Recording fees $159,659.20 

Special Service fees 11,612. 40 

Marriage certificate recording 

fees 31,668.00 

Real Property Transfer Tax ... 208. 266.85 

Ptll.206.4-5 



1968-69 

$157,547.80 
12,598.05 



1969-70 

£144,704.20 
13,35^.05 



34,204.00 30,948.00 
413.401.80 370.079.70 
5617,751.65 : 559,085.95 



The marriage certificate fees in 1967-68 were greatly increased 
over the previous fiscal year because the fee now includes an additional 
?3 for each certificate, which is credited to a property tax reduction 
fund. 



Expenditures 



1967-68 



Salaries 5179,157.90 

Other 19.200.00 

$198,357.90 



1968-69 1969-70 



$192,290.73 

16.338.36 

^208,629.09 



5194,734.50 

13.215.65 

$207,950.15 



Excess, receipts over 
expenditures 



$212,848.55 



•5409,122.56 $351,135.80 



-11- 



receipts listed do not include desk rental fees collected last 
^■i^rcal year by the R eal Estate Department for desk space in the Recorder's 
Office used by title companies, record searchers, etc. Neither do they 
include $13,713.80 estimated work for 3,565 papers (5,301) pages of 
"official" or free recordings; that is, the service rendered to war 
veterans, dependents of war veterans, compensation and pension claims, 
old age pension claims and miscellaneous Federal, State or other political 
subdivision recordings; which service is required by State law to be 
performed without fees. 

An additional ^250 could be added for other free work performed 
as a courtesy to other City and County departments. 

The monthly breakdown of recording and filing fees follows: 

1967-68 1968-6? 1969-70 

July $16,433.50 $17,479.25 $16,847.50 

August 19.329.25 18.130.80 16,015.65 

September 15,122.20 15,412.20 14,956.20 

October 16,894.95 18,106.70 16,474.35 

November 17.357.30 16,366.45 13.477.75 

December ..... 16,733.95 17,020.40 16,834.80 

January 16,262.65 16,192. 50 14,543.90 

February 15,403.55 14,985.75 13.506.55 

March ........ 17.692.10 16, 272.60 15,688.25 

April 17,705.00 18,588.10 16,829.70 

May 17.838.15 17.001.20 16,577.95 

June ;6 i l67.0Q 18,79?.9Q 17,085,65, 

$202,939.60 $204,349.85 $188,838.25 

Beginning January 1, 1968, the Recorder's Office assumed its new 
duties of collecting the Real Property Transfer Tax imposed upon transfers 
of real property in San Francisco by Ordinance No. 315-67. It was 
estimated that this new tax would mean added revenue of about $400,000.00 
per year. The figures below are for the first two complete fiscal years. 

1968-69 1969-70 

July $34,674.35 $40,194.75 

August 33.108.10 25.292.85 

September 28,024.20 27,880.45 

October 32,900.15 31.257.05 

November 29,050.65 31.^96.30 

December 43,556.10 40,047.00 

January 33.440.10 29,949.65 

February 28,692.10 28,756.20 

March 37,780.25 28,816.50 

April 38,838.60 30, 706.35 

May 40,100.50 31.841.30 

June 33.236.70 23.841.30 

TOTAL $413,401.80 $370,079.70 
-12- 



Documents Filed and Recorded 

The following are the principal classifications of the 72,917 
documents filed and recorded during 1968-69. For comparative pur- 
poses, lists for the two preceding fiscal years are included: 

1967-68 1968-69 1969-70 

Affidavits of death 1,363 1,420 1,357 

Agreements 133 493 510 

Decrees 907 1,029 1,081 

Deeds 11,863 11,962 10,342 

Deeds of Trust & Mortgages. 11,732 11,419 9,038 

Abstracts of Judgments..... 3,358 2,6l0 3,009 

Miscellaneous 30,691 30,36l 28,810 

Military Discharges 331 315 337 

Uniform Com. Code Filings.. 6,771 6,874 7,241 

Notices of Default 1,292 1,098 1,223 

Reconveyances 10,194 9,507 8,353 

Tax Liens - Federal 1.521 1.836 1.6l6 

80,156 78,924 72,917 



The figures below show recordings of deeds, deeds of trust and 
mortgages for the past 10 years: 







Deeds of Trust and 


Fiscal Year 


Deeds 
17.147 


Mortgages 


1960-61 


19.235 


1961-62 


18,680 


22,490 


1962-63 


19,707 


24,761 


1963-64 


18,379 


22,956 


1964-65 


18,390 


23,032 


1965-66 


14,877 


17,822 


1966-67 


11,210 


10,606 


1967-68 


11,863 


11.732 


1968-69 


11,962 


11,419 


1969-70 


9,038 


10,342 



The following table lists the number of marriage certificates 
recorded in San Francisco since 1950-51: 

1950-51 8,195 1960-61 6,538 

1951-52 7,220 1961-62 6,602 

1952-53 7,359 1962-63 6,786 

1953-54 6,711 1963-64 7,215 

1954-55 6,686 1964-65 7,l6o 

1955-56 6,526 1965-66 7,377 

1956-57 6,895 1966-67 7,793 

1957-58 6,502 1967-68 7,837 

1958-59 6,595 1968-69 8,311 

1959-60 6,629 1969-70 ..... 7,737 

-13- 



DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
1969-70 Annual Report 

The primary function of the San Francisco Department of 
Weights and Measures is to safeguard the consuming public by insuring 
the accuracy of commercially used weighing and measuring devices, as 
well as checking the quality of certain petroleum products and the 
weight of packaged goods sold commercially. This department was 
established in 1915* Some of its original equipment included measures 
and balances that had been on display at the 1915 Panama-Pacific 
International Exposition in San Francisco. 

Mr. 0. C. Skinner, Jr. retired as Sealer of Weights and Measures 
on November 1, 1969 after 29 years of service to the City, and at that 
time Mr. Kenneth G. Royal was appointed Sealer. The department's 
staff consists of the Sealer, a Senior Inspector, a Senior Clerk 
Typist, and six Inspectors, with offices in the basement of the City 
Hall. 

There were two matters before the Governmental Services 
Committee of the Board of Supervisors in 1969-70 which involved this 
department. One, a proposal to merge the Weights and Measures and the 
Agriculture departments, was tabled. The other, still not decided as 
of the end of the fiscal year, was a plan to add a consumer's affairs 
function to the Department of Weights and Measures. 

A significiant happening during 1969-70 was the formation of an 
association of law enforcement agencies under the direction of the 
Federial Trade Commission. This was formed to see that all consumer 
complaints will be looked into. The association will ascertain just 
where additional protection for the consumer is needed. The San 
Francisco Sealer of Weights and Measures is a member of this group. 

The State Bureau of Weights and Measures made a survey of this 
department in January of 1970 and found, among other things, 
deficiencies in testing equipment for use on electric sub-meters, 
truck meters, and liquified petroleum gas products. However, the 
1970-71 budget will permit the testing of truck meters and liquified 
petroleum gas products through a contractural arrangement. 

The State survey-report also recommended moving the Weights and 
Measures office from City Hall to a more suitable location. Such a 
move should include provision for a laboratory testing facility, 
storage and parking facilities for automotive equipment, and additional 
field equipment. Similar updated facilities, as well as expanded 
manpower requirements have been provided in recent years in the Bay 
Area counties of San Mateo, Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara, Sonoma, 
and Solano. 



-3A- 



The following is a statistical summary of the work performed 
by this department during the fiscal year 1969-70: 

There were 91 complaints received and adjusted in 1969-70 by 
our Inspectors and 123 "Orders to Conform" were issued. A total of 
723,006 packages was inspected. 



DEVICE 


Sealed 


Adjusted 


Condemned 


Confiscated 


Scales 




Counter 


1,706 


280 


200 


6 


Spring 


1,773 


285 


64 


1 


Computing 


^,613 


697 


194 


4 


Platform 


1,878 


342 


232 


7 


Person Weighers 


42 


37 


8 


2 


Prescription 


253 


19 


1 




Weights 










Drug 


8,159 




10 




Commercial 


9,084 


173 


69 




Measures 










Retail Pumps 


4, 617 


77 


575 




Grease (Oil) Meters 


163 


1 


9 


1 


Yardage Meters 


157 


2 






Liquid Measures 


809 


13 






Wholesale Meters 


7 


1 






Taxi Meters 


299 


44 


154 





33,560 

COMPARISON OF WORKLOAD FACTORS 



Certificates Issued 
Scales Tested 
Weights Inspected 
Gas Pumps Tested 
Other Measuring Devices 
Miscellaneous Visits 
Containers Inspected 



1,971 



1967-68 

15,261 

17,006 

21,052 

5,^37 

2,798 

1,570 

1,124,927 



1,516 



1968-69 



21 



1969-70 



13,077 


13,919 


13,728 


12,787 


23,647 


17,401 


4,53^ 


5,269 


2,094 


1,754 


1,454 


1,73^ 


936,350 


723,066 



-15- 



COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
AGRICULTURAL COMMISSIONER 

ANNUAL REPORT 
1969 - 1970 

The San Francisco County Department of Agriculture is a branch of the City 
and County government. It is responsible for the enforcement of all State laws, 
rules and regulations pertaining to the office of the County Agricultural Commis- 
sioner and such other work as is prescribed by the Chief Administrative Officer. 

The general purpose and responsibilities of this department include the fol- 
lowing : 

To promote and protect the agricultural industry. 

To protect and benefit both the grower and the consumer by 
enforcing the provisions of the Agricultural Code. 

Within the authority delegated to us, to promote and protect 
the health and welfare of our citizens. 

In order to provide uniformity of enforcement throughout the various coun- 
ties of California, many of the functions are performed under the supervision of the 
California State Director of Agriculture. 

The California Agricultural Code, from which this office derives its author- 
ity, became effective on August 21, 1933, when all laws pertaining to agriculture 
were removed from other codes and consolidated into one code. 

The origin of the County Department of Agriculture dates back to the year 
lS8l when the California State Legislature first authorized the appointment of County 
Boards of Horticultural Commissioners entitled: "An Act to protect and Promote the 
Horticultural Interests of the State." 

In 1909, the California State Legislature amended the act providing for the 
elimination of the three-man-board raid setting up a single Horticultural Commissioner 

As the v/ork continued to broaden, the name was changed in 1931 to "Agricul- 
tural Commissioner." In 1937, the term "County Department of Agriculture" was desig- 
nated as the official name of the department with the Agricultural Commissioner in 
charge • 

This department inspects fruits, vegetables, eggs, nuts, honey, poultry and 
rabbit meats in wholesale and retail establishments. Inspections are made of nurser- 
ies, seed firms, apiaries, post offices, express and freight terminals in order to 
detect plant diseases and insect pests and to enforce the plant quarantine require- 
ments. This department certifies agricultural products being exported to foreign 
countries so that the requirements of "Freedom from Pests and Diseases" can be met. 

We also conduct pest surveys and maintain various insect traps, including 
"Residential Grid Detection, " where one block is thoroughly checked at every 1/2 
mile interval. It is a survey specifically designed to detect, with a minimum of 
manpower expenditure, pests before they become established in an area. V/ith the 
great increase and speed of travel, the danger of introducing new pests becomes more 
acute. Introductions are most apt to occur in urban areas. 

-16- 



San Francisco County has 2 farms that produce vegetables on approximately 7 
acres; and 12 grower nurseries that produce potted plants and cut flowers in 768,64-5 
square feet of glasshouses, with a total gross value of :] 832,510. 

Revenue From Two Sourc es : 

Revenue received in 1969-70, consisted of ,,3,300.00 from the State to aug- 
ment the salary of the San Francisco Agricultural Commissioner; and ^4,716.00 export 
certification fees. 

In addition to the duties listed above, the Chief Administrative Officer 
has delegated to the Agricultural Commissioner the supervision of the Farmers' Mar- 
ket, including its functions and personnel. 

Following is a comparison breakdown of inspection services provided: 

PLANT QUARANTINE 

All shipments of nursery stock and plants, plant products including fruit, 
seed and grain, used agricultural implements and appliances; are required to be held 
for inspection upon first arrival in the county. This requirement is to prevent the 
entry of plant diseases, insects, noxious weeds or seeds, which may be detrimental 
to agriculture. The post office, railway express, freight yards and commercial 
trucking concerns are visited daily for this inspection. In addition, many plants 
are inspected at nurseries. 

In many cases treatment can be applied to plants rejected, thus insuring 
cleanliness; and the commodities may then be released. 

Plant Quarantine : 1967-68 I968-69 1969- 70 

Number of Premises 
Shipments Inspected 
Plants Inspected 
Plants Rejected 
Total Man Hours 



This is one of the major functions of this department. It relates to the 
inspection of fruits, nuts, vegetables, eggs, poultry meat, and honey, at the whole- 
sale produce terminal, retail stores, and any other place where produce is offered 
for sale. This is to insure the enforcement of the requirements governing the qua- 
lity, packing and marketing of these products, tfe inspect and certify loads of com- 
modities moving interstate or intrastate; and to foreign countries when requested 
by shippers, to show compliance with California's standardization requirements. 

Wholesale Produce Marke t; 1967-68 1968^69 1969-70 

Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Rejection Tags 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 



240 

12,842 

10,464,177 

17,760 

1,743/2 


240 

19,817 

14,287,731 
121,979 

i,6o4y 2 


239 

16,538 

13,203,482 

2,055 

1,437 


STANDARD!. 


,ATI0N 





47 


47 


48 


11,295 


11,430 


11,205 


898 


346 


645 


55,536 


50,204 


39,068 


7,136,574 


7,399,767 


7,188,441 



-17- 



Retail Stores; 



STANDARDIZATION - continued 

1967-68 1968-69 



Total Man Hours for r/holesale 
& Retail Egg Inspection 

Poultry Meat 

Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 

Total Man Hours - Poultry 

Honey 

Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 

Total Man Hours - Honey 

TOTAL MAN HOURS FOR ALL 
STANDARDIZATION 



3,513 



358 



323 



7*90 



2,755 1 /2 



391 



343 1 /2 



s>a§<* 



1969-70 



Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Rejection Tags 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 


2,145 

1,616 

254 

2,773 

214,687 


2,142 

1,726 

158 

1,607 

213,655 


2,143 

1,382 

166 

1,936 

210,153 


Farmers ' Market : 








Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Rejection Ta;js 
Packages Rejected 
Packages Inspected 


43 

13,800 

20 

1,069 

143,777 


43 

12,750 

5 

64 
141,862 


43 

12,655 

11 

182 

188,011 


Total Man Hours for all Produce 
Inspection 


5,226 


5,344 


5,157 


Wholesale Eggs: 








Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Dozens Rejected 
Dozens Inspected 


17 

607 

233,530 

949,492 


15 

464 

193,296 

815,540 


15 

498 

144,876 

635,151 


Retail Eggs: 








Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Dozens Rejected 
Dozens Inspected 


2,135 

1,905 

126,960 

676,060 


2,137 

1,946 

103,669 

646,165 


2,135 

2,065 

63,819 

518,017 



3,159 



931 


931 


931 


1,322 


1,445 


1,074 


2,560 


1,830 


332 


185,679 


140,053 


114,610 



295/2 



2,150 


2,150 


2,150 


1,531 


1,665 


1,846 


1,033 


126 


l4o 


148,751 


164,268 


173,167 



385/2 



1397 



N tnffiSERT INSPECTION 

All nurseries within the county are inspected at periodical intervals for 
the presence of pests, and for compliance with Grades and Standards. If serious 
pests are found, then eradication measures must be taken immediately by the nursery. 
All plants must be correctly labeled with the botanical name. 



Number of Nurseries 
Premises inspected 
Total Man Hours 



1967-68 

180 
241 
475 



1968-69 



1969-70 



178 
290 

327/2 


175 
235 
691 



SISD INSPECTION 



This involves the inspection and sampling of agricultural and vegetable 
seed lots at wholesale and retail locations for proper labeling as to germination. 






Number of Premises 
Premises Inspected 
Total Man Hours 



1967-68 

142 
156 
235 



1968-69 

145 
175 
210 



1969-70 

145 
137 
190 



EXPORT CERTIFICATION 

This is the inspection of fruits and vegetables going to foreign countries, 
and is done to insure the plant quarantine and standardization requirements of those 
countries, a fee is charged for this work. 



1967-68 



1968-69 



1969-70 



Certificates Issued 
Packages Inspected 



1,685 
222,481 



1,432 
194,610 



1,513 
222,265 



DISPOSAL PJlDSPySJESSUED. AT WHOLE SALE PRODUCE TERM INAL 

Disposal orders are issued for produce that has been rejected, or has been 
on hand too long. It is not salvageable. 



Disposal 
Orders Issued 

Number of Packages 



196_7-68 

1,992 
51,920 



I96D-69 

1,636 
239,363 



1969-70 

1,293 
39,605 



-19- 



PEST SURVEYS ."JJD PEST CONTROLS 



Detection surveys are important for determining the possible presence of 
new and dangerous agricultural pests. If pests can be discovered before they be- 
come too widely distributed, then there is a greater possibility of eradication. 

Agricultural pest control operators are licensed by the State Department 
of Agriculture. They must register with the Commissioner of the county in which the 
work is to be done. 

State regulations specify conditions of workmanship, and the precautions in 
application under direction of the Agricultural Commissioner. 



Number of Fruit Fly Traps 

Number of Japanese Beetle Traps 

Residential Grid Detection 

Registered Pest Control 

Operators 

Permits Issued for Use of 
Injurious Herbicides 

Permits Issued for Use of 
Injurious Materials 



1967-68 


1968-69 


1969-70 


36 


32 


32 


30 


31 


20 


213 


371 


260 


Ik 


Ik 


18 


16 


15 


15 


6 


1 


1 



Total Man Hours 



286)4 



520 



7k2Vz 



RELATED FUNCTIONS 



This includes the other varied activities such as giving garden advice to 
home owners, the gathering of crop statistics, certifying official fumigation 
chambers, and performing general public relations work. 



I * >s ****** * 



-20- 



SAN FRANCISCO FARMERS' MhRKET 

annual Report 
1969-1970 



The San Francisco Farmers' Market opened on august 12, 19^+3? during the 
wartime as an outlet for surplus and distressed crops from the neighboring 
counties. Its first location was at Market Street and Duboce .>venue, and v/as 
operated by the farmers themselves. The city and County assumed management 
on August 1st, 19kk. The Farmers' Market opened at its present location, at 
100 --lemany Boulevard, on .August 3i 19^7, under a City Ordinance which author- 
izes the Chief administrative Officer to establish a Farmers' Market to be 
administered by him or by any department under his jurisdiction. It is now 
under the supervision of the County Agricultural Commissioner who reports to 
the Chief Administrative officer through the Director of Finance and Records. 

The Farmers' Market Ordinance requires that fees charged shall be suffi- 
cient to pay the operating and maintenance costs of the Market, and in 
addition, to repay the City and County within a reasonable period, any capital 
improvements at the Market. As of June 30, 1970, »332, 965.95 had been repaid 
to the City. This is £7^, 288.90 in excess of the cost of the land and capital 
improvements at the Farmers' Market which amounted to ^258, 677.05. 



SrtLES PROMOTION : 

Sales at the Market are promoted through; news releases to newspapers and 
radio and television stations, and other outlets. We also mail growers cer- 
tificates and news information about the Market to all growers who have used 
t t#tthe Market in recent years. Informational letters concerning the Market are* 
sent to all county agricultural commissioners. 

The Market operates on a five-day week, Tuesday through Saturday, from 
7:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. 

The Market celebrated its Twenty-sibcth anniversary on August 12, 1969 • 



-21- 



On Saturday, August 9? 196°, Mayor Joseph Alioto came to the Market to honor one 
of the Market's oldest farm couples, Mr. and Mrs. Antonio Piccardo, with a Double 
Garlic Wreath Ceremony in observing the Farmers' Market's 26th Anniversary. 



The breakdown below summarizes the Farmers ' Market Capital Expenditures Program 
as of June 30, 1970. The City and County of San Francisco has been reimbursed 
for capital expenditures through the excess revenue each year. 

Capital Expenditures : (Adjusted to agree with Controller's figures 1963-64) 



Land . . . 
Improvements 
TOTAL: . . . 



53,032.15 
205,644.90 



$ 258,677.05 



Revenue and Operating Expenses : 

Revenues ....... 

Less Operating Expenses 
TOTAL NET REVENUE 



820,^12.56 
487,446.61 



332,965-95 



Excess of Net Revenue over 
Capital Expenditures . , 



$ 7^,288.90 



-22- 



RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE FARMERS' MARKET: 

The following projects are necessary for the proper maintenance of the 
Farmers ' Market : 

1. The interior of the Administration Building needs painting 
to maintain the appearance of the office, conference room, 
supply room and rest rooms. Painting will also prevent 
deterioration of the walls and woodwork. 

2. Post holes and the use of removable posts at each end of 
the main drive would aid in the safe control of traffic 
when it is expedient to close the main drive to traffic. 
These posts would also safely prevent motorists from using 
the main drive when the Market is closed for business. 

3. Repair cyclone fence: The cyclone fence which prevents 
people from entering the Market at other than proper en- 
trances, is damaged. The cyclone fence and the fence posts 
do need repair to keep the Market safe and to efficiently 
control the entrance and exit of people who use the Market. 

k. Traffic striping is urgently needed: The existing crosswalk 
clearance line and parking lane striping through out the 
Market is worn so that it is partly obliterated. This con- 
dition is leading to haphazard parking and the resultant 
loss of traffic control, and is a hazard to both motorists 
and pedestrians . 

5. Wooden partitions between stalls need replacement: Several 
wooden partitions between the stalls are rotting at their 
base and should be replaced to improve the Market and pre- 
vent injury as their present condition is dangerous. 

6. Painting of stalls: Wooden partitions between the stalls 
and all wooden surfaces at the stall spaces need painting. 

7. Security when Market is closed: Floodlights on lighting 
poles at each end of the Market would aid in keeping the 
Market secure at night. Uniform backing to enclose rear 
of each stall would aid in preventing pilferage when the 
Market is closed. 



-23- 



C { MPARIS CH 3 UMMARY : 



The following tabulation is a summary of the Farmers' Market revenues, operating 
expenses, capital costs, and stall and tonnage fees from 1946 through June 30, 
1970: 



Fiscal 
Year 



Revenues 



Operating 
Expenses 



excess of 
Rerenue 



Stalls 
Rented 



Tonnage 



1946-47 
1947-48 
1948-49 
1949-50 
1950-51 
1951-52 
1952-53 
1953-5*+ 
1954-55 
1955-56 
1956-57 
1957-58 
1958-59 
1959-60 
1960-61 
1961-62 
1962-63 
1963-6^ 
19 64-65 
1965-66 
1966-67 
1967-68 
1968-69 
1969-70 



$16,006.50 
19,7^8.00 
26,287.50 
32,190.50 
20,601.50 
29,363.50 
33,403.25 
37,423.50 
37,916.25 
35,142.00 
34,812.06 
34,844.00 
40,934.00 
46,850.75 
47,159.50 
41,769.75 
38,763.75 
37,541.00 
36,058.00 
35,892.00 
34,714.00 
32,008.50 
33,889.00 
37,093-75 



$ 4,101.48 
14,747.81 
15,285.47 
12,458.77 
21,231.69 
21,651.73 
18,374.48 
18,670.37 
18,661.35 
17,675.67 
18,454.77 
19,148.69 
22,475.18 
19,583.62 
20,708.90 
25,129.64 
20,232.25 
21,363.44 

23,156.33 
24,318.17 
24,767.28 
26,273.02 
28,475.61 
30,^20.89 



511,905.02 

5,020.19 

11,002.03 

19,731.73 

-(630.19) 

7,711.77 

15,028.77 

18,753.13 

19,254.90 

17,466.33 

16,357.29 

15,695.31 

18,458.82 

27,267.13 

26,450.60 

16,640.11 

18,531.50 

15,677.56 

12,901.67 

11,573.83 

9,946.72 

5,735.48 

5,413.39 

7,072.86 



15,428 
17,267 
20,895 
13,556 
14,431 
18,726 
20,662 
21,495 
20,755 
20,584 
20,659 
22,712 
22,128 
22,461 
21,012 
18,683 
13,367 
17,898 
17,847 
17,288 
15,781 
16,733 
18,432 



6,085 
10, 668 
11,695 
7,337* 
8,156 
3,313 
9,497 
9,481 
7,927 
3,019 
7,694 
6,885 
6,806 
6,651 
5,675 
5,244 
4,897 
4,396 
4,085 
3,668 
3,431 
3,535 
4,006 



$820,412.56 $487,446.61 $332,965-95 433,800 154,681 



* Records are incomplete for this fiscal year. 

** Market was closed from February to July due to 
construction of new stalls. 



-24- 



REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 
1969 - 1970 

The Registrar of Voters has charge of the registration of voters and con- 
ducting of elections, through the assistance of the Assistant Registrar and staff 
aides. He works with other City and County officials and agencies, State and 
Federal authorities, political parties and other groups on policy matters. A 
small permanent staff of 23 is supplemented by temporary workers averaging about 
125 weekly during registration and mailing periods prior to election. In the 
month prior to election, and the two weeks following, the crew of temporary vot- 
ing machine servicemen approximates kO men. On election day about 4,100 precinct 
election officials are employed. Temporary workers average about 67 full-time 
positions if computed on an annual basis — hence the Registrar's staff, when the 
67 full-time equivalents are added to the 23 permanent workers, numbers 90 full- 
time jobs. Figures are predicted upon a two year cycle: a municipal election in 
odd years; a primary and general election in even years. 

The Registrar and Assistant Registrar work through a small central office 
group, and control operations through supervisors of the three operating bureaus — 
election division, recruitment and property contract section, and the voting 
machine warehouse and operations division. 

Volunteer Deputies : 

The use of volunteer deputies by all recognized political parties and by 
interested groups continues to steadily increase. A significant portion of the 
work done by such "volunteers" is inferior to work processed through our regular 
and temporary office staff where better supervision and control can be exercised. 
The present laws should be amended to provide a definite limit to the use of vol- 
unteer deputies by recognized parties and other non-partisan groups. Such a 
limit should be based upon the population density of the area involved. 

Elections in 1969-70 : 

Two elections took place during the past fiscal year: a municipal elec- 
tion on November k, 1969, and a direct primary election on June 2, 1970. No 
problems were encountered in connection with the November Municipal Election, and 
the semi-official count was 90% complete by 11:00 p.m. However, only a k5% re- 
sult was available as of midnight of the June 2nd Primary. The delay was caused 
by two factors; one being the large number of candidates appearing on the ballot, 
a total of 206 candidates plus 17 state and local measures; the other that the 
election was the first direct primary election conducted entirely through elec- 
tronic data processing system. \/hile San Francisco's performance was far above 
par for the state, it is expected that in future primary elections results will 
be available at an earlier time. 

Personnel : 

The personnel structure and composition of the Registrar of Voters perman- 
ent staff has long been a problem besetting successive Registrars. Remedial 
measures instituted and supplemented during 1969 corrected most of the defects in 
the organizational structure of the office. With the presently pending request 
for the re-classification of the vacant position of 1^+03 Election Clerk to the 
position of 1408 Principal Clerk, the lines of command and succession in the three 



-25- 



Personnel : 

operating divisions of the office will be completed. 

Difficulties have been experienced the past few years with the recruitment 
of precinct election officers. Over 1800 cancellations of appointments as elec- 
tion officers occurred the last few elections, representing a turnover of 43% of 
the approximately 4100 election officers required to man our present polling loca- 
tions. We hope that the increased pay rates for election officers for the new 
fiscal year will alleviate the situation somewhat. It is also expected that upon 
the completion of re-apportionment that will take place in 1971, a reduction in 
the number of precincts will further relieve the staffing problem. 

5-Year Workload Comparison: 



Regular Elections (Number) 

Registration Affidavits (Processed) 

Registration Affidavits (Cancelled) 38,390 

Sample Ballots Mailed 

Absentee Ballots Requested (Paper) 

Absentee Vote (Paper) 

Absentee Vote (Machine) 

Precincts Used 

Voting Machines Used 

Voting Machines Loaned/Leased 

Precinct Vote (Machines) 

Total Votes Cast 

Employee Group Elections (Ballots) 

Recommendation : 

Section 183 of the Charter allowing proponents of initiative measures or 
to opponents of any local measure to present arguments to the Registrar not later 
than 35 days prior to an election should be amended to 45 days. The present 
limit of 35 days is unrealistic and expensive. A 45 day limit would substantially 
lower the cost of conducting an election because of: reduced printing costs; the 
reduction of the error factor so likely to occur because of the short interval of 
time between the 35th day before an election and the 29th day before an election 
when absentee voting commences (voters ' pamphlets and other material must then be 
ready) this amounts to 2 - 3 working days only; earlier mailing of sample ballots 
and voters' pamphlets without costly overtime, together with the additional bene- 
fit of minimizing a continuing source of voters' complaints objecting to the 
briefness of available time to analyze various local and state measures to be 
voted upon. 



-26- 



1965-66 


1966-67 


1967-68 


1968-69 


1969-70 


2 


l 


4 


1 


2 


54,333 


73,192 


102,667 


69,102 


77,4C0 


38,390 


74,109 


40,219 


35,617 


34,135 


701,497 


372,123 


1,263 ,'564 


374,335 


661,265 


7,615 


12,370 


24,602 


13,800 


7,202 


6,794 


10,613 


21,779 


13,231 


5,604 


5,780 


5,793 


19,059 


5,425 


6,180 


2,686 


1,340 


1,349 


1,349 


2,400 


3,275 


1,670 


5,897 


1,597 


3,165 


313 


260 


270 


312 


215 


425,249 


328,591 


877,928 


288,356 


402,359 


438,656 


372,188 


919,546 


307,012 


414,143 


26,157 


13,725 


29,187 


21,526 


12,121 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR - PUBLIC GUARDIAN (1969-70) 

Public Administrator 

The Public Administrator is an officer of the County 
Government as described in Section 24000 of the Government 
Code and is provided for in the Charter of the City and 
County of San Francisco. The purpose of the office is to 
provide for the protection of the property of deceased persons 
and for the protection of the interests of heirs and creditors 
in such property. 

The duties of the Public Administrator as both a con- 
servator and an administrator of the estates of deceased 
persons is set forth in Section 1140 of the Probate Code, as 
follows: "The Public Administrator of each county must take 
immediate charge of the property within his county of persons 
who have died when no executor or administrator has been 
appointed and in consequence thereof the property, or any part 
thereof, is being wasted, uncared for or lost; and of all 
estates ordered into his hands by the Court. He shall apply 
for letters of administration upon estates of decedents who 
have no known heirs when the Superior Court of his county has 
jurisdiction thereof, and may apply for such letters upon any 
other estate upon which he is entitled to administer." 

All functions pertaining to each estate are handled 
by the office staff. These functions include - the inves- 
tigation, making funeral arrangements, applications for 
letters, collection of all assets, payment of all legal debts, 
sales of real and personal property, filing and defending 
suits, obtaining all county, state, and federal tax clearances, 
and distribution to heirs and the State of California. A 
complete and thorough investigation must be made of each 
estate reported - without a proper investigation there could 
be a loss of revenue to the county as well as a loss to the 
creditors and heirs. 

Investigation of Cases 

Approximately 40 per cent of the cases investigated 
are administered by the Public Administrator's Office. The 
remaining 60 per cent either have no assets or are turned 
over to the named executor or administrator who may have a 
prioritv to serve. The above is one of the service functions 
of this office. 



-27- 



5 Year Workload Comparison 



1966-67 


1967-68 


1968-69 


1969-70 


1970-71 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Estimated 


1.367 


1,358 


1,402 


1,420 


1,400 


560 


510 


520 


556 


500 


289 


311 


370 


201 


350 


487 


373 


339 


346 


500 



Estates Investigated 
New Estates Opened 
Final Accounts Filed 
Discharges Filed 
Open Estates 

(End of Year) 1,772 1,909 2,090 2,300 2,300 
Permanent Positions 15 15 15 15 15 

Revenue from Fees $257,552 $309,723 $265,484 $219,713 $220,000 
Operating Expenses $162,120 $166,800 $187,144 $199,347 $220,000 
Net Revenue $ 95,432 $142,923 $ 78,340 $ 20,366 $ -0- 

The Public Administrator's Office is entirely self- 
supporting and as a matter of fact produces a profit for the 
City and County of San Francisco out of the revenues received 
from the estates of decedents. These revenues pay not only 
for the services in the general estates, but also for the free 
services provided in investigating decedents' deaths where no 
estates are ever opened by the Public Administrator. 

Efficiency of Administration 

The fact that the Public Administrator does receive 
statutory fees in the general probates also imposes some 
obligation on him to the heirs and creditors to at least give 
them the same attention as would private administrators. Heirs 
are frequently prepared to be critical of the Public Adminis- 
trator's Office, especially in those cases in which they have 
been denied the right to probate the estate because of their non- 
residence. They feel that, if they had been allowed to administe 
the estate, they could do a much more efficient job and a much 
speedier job than the Public Administrator. As a matter of 
fact, the Public Administrator's Office would not bow to any 
other administrator whether a corporate institution, such as 
a bank, or a private individual, as to the efficiency and speed 
with which probate matters are administered. 

The public, of course, is not aware of this and the 
constant problem of attempting to please the unreasonable as 
well as the reasonable segments of the public means that every 
step must be taken that will insure a more efficient use of 
the staff. Actually, most expenditures which could be made 
to increase efficiency would, in fact, not be additional expense, 
but rather an investment to return more income to the City. 
There is every indication that the number of cases and the amount 

-28- 



of money co be returned in estates will, during the years, 
continue to increase. The sooner these cases can be 
processed to completion, the sooner the fees are returned 
to the City treasury. 



12 Year Comparison - Expenditures and Revenues 





Budgeted 


Actual 










Fiscal 


Expendi- 


Expendi- 


Differ- 


Estimated 


Actual 


Differ- 


Year 


tures 


tures 


ence 


Revenue 


Revenue 


ence 


1959-60 


$118,185 


$115,716 


$-2,469 


$185,000 


$205,249 


$ 20,249 


1960-61 


"134,654 


129,742 


-4,912 


200,000 


203,570 


3,570 


1961-62 


147,520 


138,761 


-8,759 


210,000 


181,652 


-28,343 


1962-63 


150,721 


147,190 


-3,531 


200,000 


230,508 


30,508 


1963-64 


155,791 


149,160 


-6,631 


207,000 


215,610 


8,610 


1964-65 


162,441 


154,996 


-7,850 


200,000 


193,442 


- 6,553 


196 5-66 


171,478 


166,276 


-5,202 


200,000 


192,645 


- 7,355 


1966-67 


158,425 


162,120 


3,695 


200,000 


257,552 


57,552 


1967-68 


170,000 


166,800 


-3,200 


200,000 


309,723 


109,723 


1963-69 


131,299 


137,144 


5,845 


200,000 


26 5,484 


65,484 


1969-70 


205,642 


199,347 


6,295 


200,000 


219,713 


19,713 


1970-71 


220,000 






220,000 






Public Guardian 













The office of Public Guardian was created in San Francisco 
County on July 1, 1960, under authority of Section 5175 of the 
Welfare and Institutions Code of the State of California. On 
July 1, 1960, the Public Administrator became ex officio Public 
Guardian. The purpose of the office is to provide a public 
officer to serve, when needed, as guardian of the person and/or 
estate. 

The Public Guardian, like any other guardian appointed 
by the Court, has the care and custody of the person of his 
ward and the management of his estate until legally discharged, 
or in the case of the guardianship of a minor, until the minor 
reaches the age of majority, or the ward marries at 18 or over. 
The guardian must pay the ward's just debts as far as the estate 
is able, if necessary selling the ward's real property or borrow- 
ing on it. He must demand, sue for and collect all debts due 
the ward. He must appear for and represent the ward in all 
actions or proceedings. He must manage the ward's estate 
frugally and without waste and apply the income as far as nec- 
essary to the convenience, suitable support, maintenance, and 
age of the ward. 

He must file an inventory of all the estate's assets, 
together with an appraisal of the assets, unless the estate 



-29- 



consists of money only, or money and other personal property 
of a market value of less than $50.00. He must file periodic 
accounts for approval by the Court. Upon the death of the 
ward, if no probate of the estate is necessary, the funeral 
and last illness expenses may be paid and, after such payment 
of these expenses and of the fees of the Public Guardian, a 
balance of cash remains in the estate, this may be delivered 
to the heirs at law under Section 630 of the Probate Code or 
delivered to the Public Administrator for administration. 

The Public Guardian program has been in operation for 
ten years. The program is beneficial both to the ward and to 
the county. The ward is benefited by the personal attention 
of this office. The county is benefited by the payments for 
hospitalization and for back obligations of the ward. Without 
the Public Guardian program these incompetent people would be 
unable to collect welfare assistance. Social Security, and 
other pensions or benefits to which they are entitled. 

Eases Crowded Hospital Condition 

Where possible and when it appears to be in the best 
interest of the wards, they are moved from the county facilities 
to private rest homes. This provides additional beds at the San 
Francisco General Hospital for patients who are more in need of 
medical assistance. 



Workload Comparison 





1966-67 


1967-68 


1968-69 


1969-70 


1970-71 




Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Actual 


Estimated 


Applications 












Investigated 


2,141 


1,696 


1,792 


1,569 


1,500 


Total Wards as 












of June 30 


446 


498 


531 


533 


550 


New Wards 












during Year 


152 


124 


130 


111 


150 


Guardianships 












Terminated 


102 


74 


97 


109 


100 



Expenditures$ 116,376 $ 131,636 $ 139,191 $ 156,905 $ 162,360 
Benefits to 

County $1,762,000 $1,800,000 $1,800,000 $2,000,000 $2,000,000 
Revenues from 

Fees $ 18,526 $ 18,853 $ 52,581 $ 88,461 90,000 

Fees 

The Welfare and Institutions Code provides that the Public 
Guardian may be awarded fees by the judge of the Superior Court 

-30- 



on the filing of his accounts. The fees for the last fiscal 
year amounted to $88,400.00. These fees are in addition to 
other benefits, both direct and indirect, received through 
this program. 

Present and Anticipated Future Requirements 

The workload of this office is continually increasing 
due to four situations: (1) Burial of the indigent dead? 
(2) investigation and burial arrangements of competent persons 
who die outside the County and who are recipients of Welfare 
benefits; (3) the inability to cover about 18 weeks of vacation 
time of employees directly involved in preliminary investigations; 
and (4) the increased responsibility for proper management of 
real property under the jurisdiction of the Public Administrator- 
Public Guardian. 

At present the San Francisco College of Mortuary Science 
has a contract with the City and County of San Francisco for the 
removal and burial of the indigent dead. Due to the increased 
number of welfare recipients dying outside the county, the 
determination of indigency, especially at nights and weekends, 
has become a serious problem. The jurisdiction of various 
County Departments (such as the Department of Public Health, 
the Coroner, and the Public Administrator) in determining the 
indigency of these decedents is in doubt. At joint meetings 
of representatives of these departments, it was concluded on 
a purely practical basis that the Public Administrator was in 
the best position to determine indigency and to complete the 
necessary arrangements when the death occurs during the night 
or weekend hours. At this time there is no way to make any 
reasonable calculation as to the effect on the Public Admin- 
istrator workload in the near future. 

The other situation which affects the workload is the 
increasing practice by the Department of Social Welfare and 
the County Hospitals of placing competent patients in nursing 
and convalescent homes in other counties (Alameda, Contra Costa, 
Napa, Solano, San Mateo, Marin, Sonoma). Since these persons 
are involuntarily removed, they are residents of San Francisco 
and the other counties will not assume liability for their 
burial. 

At the joint meetings referred to above, a practical 
working arrangement has been initiated whereby the other 
affected departments are supposed to supply the Public 
Administrator's office with detailed information as to these 
placements and the history and assets of the patients. 



-31- 



In connection with real property, the occurrence of 
"breakins," the involvement with code enforcement and com- 
laints from tenants and neighbors has and will continue to 
consume considerable time. 

It is anticipated that due to the problems created by 
points 3 and 4 above that additional investigatory employees 
will be required. On a very short time basis this might be 
handled by temporary employments, which is not a very desir- 
able permanent solution. Two additional permanent Class 42 30 
Estate Investigator positions must be allowed. 

The accounting system for the Public Guardian has been 
completely changed from the manual to the electronic accounting 
machine operation. The change from manual to electronic 
accounting machine operation for the Public Administrator will 
be accomplished this year. 



-32- 



TAX COLLECTOR 

1969-70 

The Office of the Tax Collector has undergone some changes in fiscal 
year 1969-70 and set in motion the foundation for other changes for future 
years. An examination was held for the position of Tax Collector and as a 
result a new person came to this office after it had been administered by 
an interim Tax Collector for a period of almost two years. The new Tax 
Collector, with the assistance of his entire staff, has beun making progress 
towards pinpointing some of the problem areas and making plans for their 
resolution. 

After examining the organizational structure of the Tax Collector's 
office, it was decided that the major operations should be separated into 
several divisions. This was done wherein six operational units were created. 
These divisions are Real Estate, Cashiering, Business Tax, Delinquent Revenue, 
Investigation and License. The legal unit has moved into a staff alignment 
to give legal advise to the entire Tax Collector's Office, Other staff 
support functions created were those of Administrative Assistant and Payroll 
and Personnel Desk. Parking Meter Collection was made temporarily responsible 
to the Cashiering Division until such time as it is determined whether it 
should be an individual Division. 

This reorganization also determined that there should be a Chief 
Assistant Tax Collector who would have line responsibility for the operation 
of the entire office in the absence of the Tax Collector and who cculd give 
key assistance to the Tax Collector in the day to day operations of office 
routine. Many of these changes have been put into effect and while this 
structure is net inflexible, we feel that it better serves the purposes of 
this office at this time. Application was made to the Civil Service Com- 
mission for certain job reclassifications needed to reinforce the reorgani- 
zation of this office. The staff of the Civil Service Commission has made 
a study of our request and is in the process of making recommendations to 
the Commission. We feel that our requests are justified and hope that the 
Commission acts favorably on them. 

This office has instituted a program of periodic staff conferences 
between the division supervisors. We have found this beneficial in educating 
other divisions to the problems and the progress of each unit and also found 
this tc be a good avenue for resolving intradivi sional problems that arise 
within this office. 

Difficulty was encountered in administering the Business Tax Ordinance 
when it required two filing cycles annually, le petitioned the Board of 
Supervisors to amend the Ordinance so that there would be only one filing 
in order to give our staff adequate time to complete the filing routine 
and allow us to make internal and external audits on filings. The Ordinance 
was amended on March 26, 1970 and machinery was established to allow for 
field audits. The Tax Collector has intimately involved himself with the 
Business Tax Division both because of its relative newness and because of 
the many problems brought about by its administration. 



-33- 



Based on our experience with the Ordinance over the past year and 
a half, we feel that it has a legitimate place in the revenue structure of 
the City and County of San Francisco. Given proper staffing and time to work 
out certain logistical aspects of administration we feel that this Ordinance 
as presently enacted could and should produce approximately nine million dol- 
lors a year in revenue. The revenue potential of the Ordinance has been con- 
stantly incruasing because of the increased diligence in its administration 
and our efforts in its enforcement. Our field investigators have spent 
extensive time seeing that taxpayers are timely in their filings and aware 
of the Ordinance so that the taxpayer may escape unusual penalties. When 
a full fledged audit operation is established we feel that increasingly 
the full revenue potential of the Ordinance will be realized. 

The Real Estate section of this office went through intensive study 
with the objective of streamlining and converting our system to data pro- 
cessing. This took the most part of a year to accomplish. Along with the 
staff from EDP and the Controller's Audit Bureau the staff of this office 
visited other Northern California Counties that have already converted to 
data processing. The counties visited were Marin, Alameda, San Mateo, 
Santa Cruz, Santa Clara and Los Angeles County. From our physical inspection 
of these facilities and from our discussions with the Tax Collectors involved, 
we formulated plans for scheduled implementation of a partial conversion 
to data processing for fiscal year 1970-71. Our staff realizes that we will 
have to operate very carefully because of the accuracy that has to be main- 
tained in setting up this system so as not to disturb our real estate 
collections. V!e feel that if all goes well a full conversion can take place 
during fiscal year 1971-72. 

Since the Tax Collector's staff was increased by U2 positions with 
the passage of the Business Tax Ordinance this office is cramped for space. 
During the past fiscal year we constantly sought to educate the Mayor's 
Office and the Board of Supervisors of the necessity for making alterations 
to our present office. We pointed out that these physical changes were 
needed in order to make maximum use of the limited space available. We 
finally received funding to begin making some of these changes. We are in 
the process of staff conferences to resolve among ourselves what the priori- 
ties will be for the expenditure of these initial funds. We have also been 
in consultation with the Bureau of Architecture and together we have tenta- 
tively drawn up plans for phasing in the remodeling project. 

The Tax Collector, along with other departments, has been called 
upon by the Board of Supervisors to give consultation towards the expansion 
of the tax revenue base of San Francisco. We feel that since San Francisco 
relies so heavily on the real property tax there will be a strong attempt 
to widen the tax base with other revenue measures. It is assumed that this 
office will have the responsibility for administering any new tax measure 
that is enacted for the City and County. 

Overall we feel that definite progress has been made during the past 
fiscal year in accomplishing some of the objectives we set for ourselves. 
We have laid the basic framework during the past fiscal year and we lock 
forward to some definite fruition during the next. 



-3^- 



List of Collections 

Following is a table of collections for the various divisions for 
1969-70, as compared with 1963-69. 

1968-69 1969-70 

Real Property Taxes and Secured 

Personal Property Taxes $200,529,267.98 $237,910,629.87 

Unsecured Personal Property Taxes 17, 003, 928. U5 19,210,810.98 

Uniform Sales and Purchase Tax 22,882,16^.29 23,829,955.37 

Parking Meters 1,280,323.73 1,319,778.09 

Delinquent Revenue 1,92U, 888.57 2,288,177.50 

Licenses U, 807, 267. 30 5,07U,2U7.93 

Business Tax 1,968, 9U5. 81 7,926, U31. 72 

Miscellaneous 199, 296. U2 mi,856.1|0 

TOTAL $250,596,082.55 $297,701,887.86 

Cashier's Division 

During 1969-70 the Cashier's Division of the Tax Collector's Office 
collected $297,701, 237. C6, an all-tine high for the sixteenth c ncecutive year, 

Peak periods for tax collection were from March 1 to September 15 
for unsecured personal property taxes, and from November 1 to December 31 
and March 1 to April 20 for real property taxes. Peak periods for license 
collections were in January, July and October. Business tax was collected 
January thru June. 

Parking Meter Unit 

The Parking Meter Unit collects, sorts, counts, and prepares for 
deposit all coins deposited in approximately 1U,162 parking meters in San 
Francisco. Thirteen collectors are used in the operation, eight men in 
four panel trucks collecting the money and winding the springs of about 
U,721 meters daily, while five men in the office process the coins. Of 
the Ui,6l7,752 coins handled during the fiscal year 1969-70, 29,750,210 
were pennies or 66.9%j 9,299,U32 were nickels or 20.7$j and 5,568,110 were 
dimes or 12. k%» The total weight of the coins processed during the year 
was 329,106 pounds. 

During the year U22 lbs. of mutilated coins, plugs, can rings and 
foreign coins were processed. Canadian and ether foreign coins were 
redeemed for $386. Ul. 

The increase in weight and revenue is attributed in part to the 
installation of an additional 1000 meters. 

Real Estate Division 

The continued adaptation of EDP to property tax collections and 
accounting has resulted in the installation in 19'69-70 of two printers and 



-35- 



one viewer to give improved service to the public. The printers can issue 
a duplicate bill almost immediately while the viewer enables the information 
clerk tc give instant information concerning every property in 
San Francisco. 

Further adaptation of EDP is anticipated for the 1970-71 tax year 
which should result in some of the manual operations being converted to 
electrcnic procedures. This year we will ask the taxpayer to return only 
the installment stub with his payment instead of the entire bill as in the 
past years. 

Real estate tax delinquencies in San Francisco continue to be among 
the lowest of the major counties in the State. 

The following table shows delinquencies for 1969-70 compared with 
1968-69. 

Unsecured 
Real Property Taxes Property Taxes 

Amount Delinquent June 30, 1970 3,388,977.73 813,61*0. 7U 

Amount Delinquent June 30, 1969 2,279,168.50 552. 295.01* 
Per Cent Delinquent June 30, 1970 1.1*0 3.71 

Per Cent Delinquent June 30, I969 1.12 2.96 

There were 2,828 parcels sold to State and ll* deeded to the State 
in 1969-70 compared to 2,1*81 sold to State and 16 deeded to the State in 
the prior fiscal year. 

Uniform Sales and Purchase Tax 

San Francisco's Uniform Sales and Purchase Tax has been collected 
since July 1, 1958, by the State of California as agent for the City and 
County, and the revenues minus collection costs are returned to the City 
and County. 

The figure for this year is $23,829,955.37 - 1569-70. 

Business Tax Division 

The Business Tax Ordinance went into effect on October 1, 1968. 
Originally, the measure of the tax period was on a quarterly basis and the 
first collection was payable in January, 1969. In March, 1969, the measure 
of the tax period was amended to a semi-annual basis with the first semi- 
annual period ending June 30, 1969, and payment due during the month of 
July, 1969. In March, 1970, the measure of the Tax period was amended to 
an annual basis with the first annual period ending December 31, 1970, and 
payment due during the months of January and February 1971. Collections 
on a cash basis totaled $7,926,1*31.72 for the fiscal year 1969-70. As of 
now, it is estimated that $8,000,000.00 will be collected annually. 



-36- 



License Livision 

For the fiscal year 1969-70, the License Division has shown a marked 
increase in gross receipts collected. This was primarily made possible by 
the transfer of approximately 1,950 Public Eating Place accounts from the 
Department of Public Health to the License Division for collecticn. 

Several other new classifications were added to the License Division 
Accounts as indicated in the report and their receipts reflected notably 
to the total amount collected. 

Following is a breakdown of licenses by type, number and amount for 
1969-70 compared to I968-69. 

1968 1969 1969 1970 







Number 




Amount 


Number 


Amount 


General Business 




30,657 


$ 


830,665.59 


30,759 


$ 70U,271.1U 


Vehicles 




3U8 




39,90ii.UO 


369 


U2,2l8.5o 


Bicycles 




3,227 




1,613.50 


2,705 


1,352.50 


Inspection Fees 




2,327 




90,72U.99 


2,189 


89,532.00 


Contractors 




No Ion ^ 


lev 


liable for licen; 


sing since 


7-1-69. 


Miscellaneous 




3,7LU 




8,683.55 


U,U67 


10,221.95 


Dogs 




30,368 




121,572.00 


30,U9U 


121,976.00 


Duplicate Dogs 




U50 




222.00 


U05 


202.50 


Curb Painting 




13 




2,012.50 


lU 


2,027.00 


Pub. Eat. Place 




796 




U8, 966.00 


2,759 


169,533.75 


Taxicab Permits (New) 








60 


90,000.00 


Taxicab Transfers 


(New) 








h 


U, 000.00 


Limousine Permits 


(New) 








5 


25,000.00 


Limcusine Transfe] 


7S (Ne' 


«) 






1 


750.00 


TOTAL (Excluding 












Hotel Tax) 




73,879 


$ 


l,l6h,337.53 


7U,23l 


$1,261, 085. 3U 


Hotel Room Tax 




1,U10 




3,U17,525.01 


l,Uu0 


3,813,173.75 


GRAND TOThL 












License Bureau 




75,289 


$ U,581,862.5U 


75,671 


$5,07U,259.09 


Hotel Room Tax Unit 













Although a separate Budget item, the Hotel Room Tax as shown above 
is collected by the Division of -Licenses. 

Each quarterly amount represents the tax collected by the hotels 
between the dates specified. 

A comparison of collections by quarters follows; 



-37- 



1968 - 1969 1969 - 1970 

July 1 - September 30 $ 901, 910. Ok $ 912,613.60 

October 1 - December 31 872,316.28 l,lu3,l5l.H 

January 1 - March 31 8O8,U80.65 921,966. Ou 

April 1 - June 30 83U,8lO.OU 835,uu3.00 



TOT^L $3,117,525.01 $3,813,173.75 

Delinquent Revenue Division 

A total of 8,232 accounts, other than personal property billings, was 
transferred to the Delinquent Revenue Division by various City and County 
Departments during 1969-70. 

The number of accounts handled represents a continuous increase over 
those of previous fiscal years. This was accomplished with no increase in the 
number of personnel and without a full crew of investigators in the field 
for the entire yoar. 

As part of the reform program many more personal property bills 
have been placed on the secured roll resulting in a slight crop of the 
unsecured bills transferred to the Tax Collector. 

Cost to the City and County for monies collected by the Delinquent 
Revenue Division was approximately 5% during the same fiscal year. 

Following is a summary of activities of the Delinquent Revenue 
Division fcr 1969-70 showing a comparison with 1968-69. 



1968-69 1969-70 



No. Unsec. Prop. Tax Bills 
Collections, Unsec. Del. Prop. Taxes 

No. Pub. Health Dept., Del. ..tccts. 
Collections, Pub. Health Dept. 

No. Pub. Library Del. Accts. 
Collections, Public Library 

New Sonoma Home Accts. 
Collections, Sonoma Home 

No. Other City & Co. Dept.Del. Accts. 
Collections, Other Depts. 

No. Interest, Fees, Court Costs Accts. 
Collections, Interest, Fees, Court Costs 

Total No. Accounts Received 

Total Collections, Delinquent Accts. 



-38- 



78,292 
$1,295,95U,93 


39,758 
$2,000,561.76 


1,9U1 
353,533-21* 


1,781; 
252,981.29 


2,972 
12,612.11 


U,770 
10,618,92 


11 

83,987.00 


5 
79,317.53 


2,U66 
68,600.6U 


730 
212,909.28 


LU5 
2,259.61 


11*7 

1,395.93 


85,027 
$1,016,9U7.56 


U7,259 
$2,557,731.71 



As part of collection enforcement procedures, 3U7 court actions were 
instituted in 1969-70. Of this total, 179 were filed in Small Claims Court, 
1$0 in the Municipal Court and 18 in the Superior Court. 

Investigation Division 

Investigation Division operates in a staff capacity servicing delin- 
quent accounts of both the Division of Delinquent Revenue and the Business 
Tax Division, 

Its main function is to make field investigations in connection with 
the collection of delinquent accounts and to bring about compliance with 
registrations in connection with the Business Tax Ordinance. 

For the 1969-70 year, 13,$U0 accounts were carried over from the 
previous year plus 9,073 accounts transferred during the year. Of these 
22,613 accounts 6,276 closed out during the year, leaving 16,237 on hand 
June 30, 1970. This increased carryover from last year is due to the 
delinquent accounts in the Business Tax Division. 



-39- 



COUNTY CLERK 
1969-70 



The County Clerk's office serves as the ministerial arm and 
office of record of the Superior Court of the Cit/ and County of San 
Francisco. In addition, certain statutory indices are maintained; 
the principal ones are the Corporation index, the Partnerships and 
Fictitious N-mes Index, and the index of Notaries Public. Marriage 
licenses are issued by this department. Branch offices are located 
at the Hall of Justice, the Youth Guidance Center, and at San Francisco 
General Hospital. 



1968-69 



3 Year Summary Comparison 1967-68 

Superior Court Proceedings: 

Civil actions and petitions 12,399 

Probate petitions 3,807 

Criminal actions 3.158 

Juv. petns. no. of children 3.456 

Ken. Health petitions 814 

Appeals to Superior Court 280 

Marriage licenses issued 7,917 

Detailed operations of the various divisions of the County Clerk's 
Office are shown below: 



12,420 


13.14^ 


3.997 


4,00? 


3.275 


4.4o3 


3.420 


w* 


571^ 


6co 


8,505 


232 


7,73<? 



Cashier's Division 



The revenue from fees collected in l<}66m6<) was £583*5^^ A 






comparative statement of fee revenue follows: 



1967-68 



1968-69 



Probate Department 
General Department 
Civil Department 
Marriage License Dept, * 
Professional Registrations 

Total Office Fees 



$83,655 


$88,901 


132,669 


136,058 


52,597 


49,643 


7.917 


8,505 


380 


436 



$277,218 



$283.54} 



♦Marriage License and Professional Registration Fees 
are now collected by the Recorder's Office. 



Fines, Law Library Fees and 
Collections for Other Departments 






1967-68 



1968-69 



\W-lo 



Juvenile Court Traffic Fines $12,741 $12,323 * \\A5o 

Crim. Dept. Fines & Forfeitures 47,717 58,559 H-3,4^0 

Peace Officers Training Fund 6,478 8,2l6 30,2111 

Payments to State Dept. Pub. Health 4,396 4,122 X"f37 

(sec. 26859 Govt. Code) 

Law Library Fees 76,661 102,702 \ISZ\O 



-40- 



CASHIER'S DIVISION (Continued) 



Fines, Law Library Fees and 

Collections for Other Departments : 1967-68 1968-69 



mill 



Sup. Ct. Reporters Salary Fund 

Total Fees and Fines Collected 



$234,201 $231,280 
$659.^12 $700,7^5 



4 






5", $3% $60 
11331 



Trust Fund Deposits: 
Civil Court Deposits & Jury Fees 1,748,044 5,653,893 
Criminal Bail Deposits, Cash & Bonds 40,036 86,525 

Total Money Collected $2,447,492 $5,740,418 W F, <\ O $, 55% 

GENERAL DIVISION „ _ ... 

iimi} 

New Civil actions filed during the past fiscal year totaled 12, * »£ ? (> • 
compared with • I£,39 9*~in I * ? 6 ?-6Q. A breakdown of other filings follows : 



n,Wfi 



HW-6<} 



1967-68 



1966-69 



Civil Actions 

Adoptions 

Certificates of Incorporation 

Cts.of Copartnership & Fie. Names 

Official and Notarial Bonds 

Oaths of Office 



12,399 


12,420 


445 


355 


811 


1,223 


894 


1,1*9 


1.043 


1.325 


550 


477 



13,744 
1,141 

Vis- 



The following is a classification by character of civil actions filed. 



1967-68 



1968-69 



Personal Injury Cases 

By Motor Vehicles 
Others 

Divorce 

Annulment 

Separate Maintenance 

All Other Actions 



2,559 


2,733 


1,634 


1,671 


3.278 


3,378 


513 


507 


227 


191 


4,188 


3,940 



Totals 



12,399 



12,420 



<U±Jo 

4.030 

'331 



CIVIL DIVISION 



Disposition of Civil Actions: 
Judgts. by Jury on Verdict 
Judgts. Misc. after Ct. Hearings 
Judgts. on Default 
Dismissals by Parties 



1967-68 



I968-69 



315 


289 


4,352 


3,364 


66 


58 


4,060 


3,438 



[46lr1< 



26? 

lite 



-41- 



CIVIL DIVISION (Continued) 



Disposition of Civil Actions: 
Trsfrd.to other Jurisdictions 
Sep. Maint. Judgts. Grtd. 
Annulments of Marriage Grtd. 
Interloc. Decrees of Div. Grtd. 
Final Decrees of Div. Grtd. 

Appeals to District and Supreme 
Courts from Superior Court 

Appeals Disposed of: 
Affirmed 
Modified 
Reversed 
Dismissed 



1967-68 1968-69 [W~3£. 



287 
27 

393 
2,740 
2,155 



326 



344 
24 

348 
2.465 
2.374 



280 



233 

2,432, 
3,01 Z 



3o<) 



PROBATE DIVISION 



New Estate and guardianship proceedings totaled 3.99 P compared with 
■- f ^ - SO y- for the previous fiscal year. 



40 


59 


n 


3 


3 


3 


31 

53 


54 
66 

Vt,oot 

1 !.<¥¥? comoared « 


58 

ith 



3.W 



Probate Proceedings Filed: 
Testate 
Intestate 
Missing Persons 

Guardianship Proceedings Filed: 
Minor 

Incompetent 
Conservator 

Letters Issued: 
Testamentary 
Administration 

Administration with Will Annexed 
Special 
Guardianship 
Conservator 



1967-68 1968-69 W^-lo 



2,028 


2,070 


z,m 


1,091 

4 


1,187 
2 


mj 


205 


196 


x m 


272 


252 


12Z 


207 


290 


2*W 


1.779 


1,816 


\,m 


780 


954 


1$Z 


289 


320 


335- 


163 


149 


15V 


428 


482 


403 


229 


293 


33 9 



CRIMINAL DIVISION 



Four courts hear criminal matters daily at the Hall of Justice. 
One is the Master Calendar department and the other three are trial courts, 
Trials are periodically sent to the City Hall for trial. There are two 
trial courts located at City Hall. 

Statistics below are based on number of defendants: 



New Actions Filed: 
Informations » 



-3,158 3.275 
.2,417 2,553 



1Mb 



-42- 



CRIMINAL DIVISION (Continued) 

1967-68 1968-69 iqkq-'fo 



New Actions Filed, (Cont'd) 
Indictments 

Cert, from Muni. Ct. for Judgt. 
Cert, from Muni. Ct. for Hearing on 

Sexual Psychopathy 
Pets, for Cert, of Rehabilitation 
Cert, from Muni. Ct. for Hearing on 

Present Sanity 
Cert, from Muni. Ct. to Determine 

Narcotic Addiction 
Petitions for <*/rits of Habeas Corpus 

Disposition of C^ses: 
Convicted after Pleas of Nolo 

Contendere 
Convicted after Pleas of Guilty 
Convicted after Court Trials 
Convicted after Jury Trials 
Dismissed 

Transferred to other Jurisdictions 
Acquitted after Court Trials 
Acquitted after Jury Trials 
Sentenced to County Jail 
Sentenced to State Prison 
Sentenced by Fines 
Committed to Youth Authority 
Committed as Sexual Psychopaths 
Committed as Insane 
Prob.Grtd., incl. Conditional Prob. 
Certs, of Rehabilitation Granted 
Committed re: Narcotic Addiction 

Fines and Bail Forfeitures Collected: 
Fines and Assessments 
Bail Forfeitures 

Appeals to State Appellate C^urt 
Pending at Beginning of Year 
Filed During the Year 

Disposition of Appeals: 
Affirmed 
Reversed 
Dismissed 
Pending 
Modified 



354 


252 


Ml 


23 


25 


11 


8 


7 


r 


9 


10 


lo-J 


205 


281 


124 


17 


39 


2o 


128 


79 


HZ 


27 


34 


M 


1,898 


2,146 


I/7Z5" 


305 


323 


33 Z 


124 


64 


124 


378 


324 


V\1 


35 


29 


\<\ 


168 


221 


\c\o 


21 


12 


23 


142 


127 


I3U 


272 


184 


3oo 


5 


10 


6 


92 


80 


13 


15 


7 


4 


100 


126 


lit 


1,636 


1.889 


laiz 


9 


7 


iH 


103 


160 


m 


$43,098 


$47,949 


'31,412.- 


29.851 


23,400 


in,n& 


158 


150 


m 


121 


99 


\s% 


57 


60 


66 


8 


10 


n 


60 


40 


3<? 


150 


138 


167 


4 


1 


U 



Coroner's Transcripts Filed 369 430 14 



-43- 



JUVENILE COURT DIVISION 

The Juvenile Court meets every week day at the Youth Guidance 
Center, 375 -fooaside Avenue, San Francisco. Statistics follow: 

1967-68 1968-69 ]C\(,q -1o 



Petitions Filed: 








Ptns. for Comm. of Dependent 






4*1) 


Children 


383 


389 


Number of Children 


591 


712 


7\5~ 


Ptns. Filed on Delinquent 








Children 


2,865 


2,708 


V57 


Number of Children 


2,865 


2,708 


2,557 


Hearings by the Court: 








Detention 


2,784 


2,901 


n 


Special 


224 


421 


2q\ 

2(o 


Abandonments 


47 


28 



Number of records sealed 209 241 |-J"7 

Juvenile Traffic Hearings : 

Moving violations 5.658 4,172 A 4,^35* 

Fines collected $12,185 $12,236 f j j' t\\£ 

STATE HOSPITAL COURT DIVISION 

The State Hospital Court meets at 2:00 P.M. every week day at San 
Francisco General Hospital, 2450 Twenty-second Street. The Court Clerk is 
in attendance from 8 A.M. to 5 P.M. lionday through Friday. 

The Lantennan - Petris - Short Act became effective July 1, 1969. 
This legislation made drastic changes in mental health court procedures, 
completely eliminating the old style committments. 

1969 -70. 



Alleged Mentally Disordered Persons: 




Filings 


595 


Conservators appointed 


50 


?ost>- certified (90 days) 


10 


Discharged 


535 


Intemperance (No drug petitions) 




Filings 


2 


Conservator appointed 


1 


Discharged 


1 


Mentally Retarded: 




Filings 


3 


Committed 


3 


Discharged 






-44- 



53 


t*6 


or\ 


26 


11 


12 


19 


15 


n 


10 


9 


6 


26 


25 


i 



APPELLATE DIVISION 

Three judges of the San Francisco Superior Court, appointed by the 
Judicial Council, sit each Friday morning as the Appellate Department of 
the Superior Court. Appeals from the Municipal Court, Criminal and Civil, 
are heard by the Appellate Division. Appeals from the Small Claims Court 
are retried from the beginning. 

1967-68 1968-69 {Qtf£ ~1p 

Civil Appeals from Muni Court 
Filed During the Year: 91 69 H3 

Disposition of Appeals: 
Affirmed 
Reversed 
Dismissed 
Rehearings Denied 
Under Submission or Pending 

Criminal Appeals from Muni Court 
Filed During the Year: iy} 92 j 23 

Disposition of Appeals: 

Affirmed 

Reversed 

Dismissed 

Pending 

Abandoned 

Appeals from Small Claims Court 52 58 66 

Disposition of Small Claims Appeals 

Affirmed 42 36 -3^ 

Reversed 2 7 J to 

Dismissed 7 15 11 

Under Submission or Pending 5 10 £ 



LICENSE DIVISION 



1967-68 1968-69 \W-1& 

Marriage Licenses Issued 7.917 8,505 W^l 

Professional Registrations 190 218 220 



72 


20 


\£ 


3 


10 


4 


^5 


70 


s\ 


21 


13 


23 


4 


1 


fl. 



-45- 



>• 



7/- > 



7^/